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'Game changing' Qualcomm wireless charging could feature on BMWs by 2017

thegruf

Active Member
Mar 24, 2015
2,290
2,070
indeterminate
odds that Tesla are looking at this?

"Graeme Davison, Qualcomm's Vice President of technology, told evo that the system is essentially production-ready, and that the company is working with several manufacturers to introduce the technology into their model line-ups."

"There's even scope for a more powerful 22kW charger to be fitted to the next Formula E safety car - Qualcomm says a 22kW charger could fill an i8's empty battery in as little 15 minutes, and perhaps more impressively, it could even fill the much larger battery of the all-electric i3 in less than an hour."


"There’s even talk of charging on the move – wireless platforms that could be integrated into Formula E street track surfaces that charge the car as it travels along at high speed. Qualcomm is reportedly experimenting with this technology, but unsurprisingly, it’s still some way off being able to charge cars at full race pace. Nevertheless, it previews a future of wireless charging technology that could work on the road."


http://www.evo.co.uk/bmw/i8/16557/game-changing-qualcomm-wireless-charging-could-feature-on-bmws-by-2017



 

Footbag

Member
Jun 29, 2013
527
152
Edmonton, Canada
No mention of the ~20% efficiency losses associated with wireless charging.

I am curious (and have no idea, thus this post), even with a ~20% efficiency loss, would it still be 'better' than ICE? What I am getting at is if wireless charging somehow did manage to captivate people into electric cars in significant numbers, would the cars still be better for the environment (given 20% waste of electricity), and would they still be economical (compared to filling up with gas, assuming the car owner ends up paying for all electricity)? For my question, I'm fine ignoring all other factors (of which I am sure there are many, infrastructure costs, maybe environmental factors (snow on the roads?)).

It would be interesting/ironic if wireless chargers ended up on our roads, maybe at intersections. Thus, while you are annoyed waiting at a red light, maybe you get a top up of range at the same time :)
 

thegruf

Active Member
Mar 24, 2015
2,290
2,070
indeterminate
Still going to need SCs for longer trips but I can see these at traffic lights and many parking bays for a quick top up without having to fuss with cables.

Perhaps more interesting is that over time with sufficient installs, the requirement to haul 85KHW weight of battery around with you may actually decrease.
If you image these everywhere then of course the ICE case fall apart quicker then ever.

Wonder waht the weight penalty is for the pickup on the car side (at least it will be low CoG)?
 

WarpedOne

Supreme Premier
Supporting Member
Aug 17, 2006
4,409
7,639
Slovenia, Europe
This is one final step that will put EVs in front of gas cars. Not only equal but overtake them.
A car that does not ever need to fill or plug in.
You park and drive. And nothing else.
 

ItsNotAboutTheMoney

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2012
10,924
8,625
Maine
Chris, If it helps - We have had wall to battery efficiency in low 90's % efficiency for a while now, compared to AC Plug in efficiency (also measured wall to battery) which is at best a few % more and generally in the 95% area

[yes I am the same G Davison]

So, how much weight would it add to the car (excluding any additional cabling)? And what kind of size device would be required for 22kW?
 

ItsNotAboutTheMoney

Well-Known Member
Jul 12, 2012
10,924
8,625
Maine
Still going to need SCs for longer trips but I can see these at traffic lights

No need. Long-distance driving has most traffic lights at the beginning and end, not where you'd need the charge in the middle.

... and many parking bays for a quick top up without having to fuss with cables.

Possibly.

Perhaps more interesting is that over time with sufficient installs, the requirement to haul 85KHW weight of battery around with you may actually decrease.
If you image these everywhere then of course the ICE case fall apart quicker then ever.

No, can't see it. Batteries will get cheaper, and capacity ~ range ~ power ~ charging speed. So, most people would always want and buy more capacity.
Long-distance driving is relatively infrequent. Putting stuff in the road just means more cost for the road and more disruption when there's construction or an accident.

Tesla has the model right: larger batteries, allowing good performance, charge at home for the vast majority of miles, allow buffer for outages or charging failure, use high-power-as-possible charging hubs for OTR recharging.
 

ProSkeptic

Member
Jul 8, 2015
62
1
Michigan
So, how much weight would it add to the car (excluding any additional cabling)? And what kind of size device would be required for 22kW?

Well... isn't a residential transformer typically rated for 30 kW? I'd have to think that half a transformer, rated for 22 kW in a non-contact setup would have to be pretty substantial, even if it was only intended for a ~10% duty cycle.
 

Twiglett

Single pedal driver
Oct 3, 2014
3,053
3,140
Austin
this sounds great - but for public charging the cable offers the most flexibility.
In most outdoor parking lots you can have a single pedestal able to potentially able to plug into four parking spots - obviously not at once, but it can be done.
Wireless charging is a one spot, one car deal.
 

thegruf

Active Member
Mar 24, 2015
2,290
2,070
indeterminate
... No, can't see it. Batteries will get cheaper, and capacity ~ range ~ power ~ charging speed. So, most people would always want and buy more capacity.
Long-distance driving is relatively infrequent. Putting stuff in the road just means more cost for the road and more disruption when there's construction or an accident.

Tesla has the model right: larger batteries, allowing good performance, charge at home for the vast majority of miles, allow buffer for outages or charging failure, use high-power-as-possible charging hubs for OTR recharging.

weight ...
 

No2DinosaurFuel

Active Member
Apr 16, 2015
1,407
861
San Diego, California
weight ...

What if the weight of the wireless charging exceeds the larger battery? Unlikely but possible. I say inductive charging is great for some situation, but not for cars because the convience gain is not worth the inefficiency cost, complexity, and monetary cost. Put it towards the better battery or robotic connectors like tesla's snake.
 

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
3,028
The Americas
Testing now in the UK for embedded wireless charging in the roadways.

I could see such a feature for toll roads and HOV lanes in the States, with fees to follow.

The option of a full charge by the time I reached the office *and* by the time I got home, without having to compete for scarce resources would be nice. This would more easily facilitate offsite client meetings as well as never-ending evening commitments - without having to make time to charge elsewhere.

Sadly, even if in-road charging became viable, I doubt there would be widespread adoption for decades. Although a case could be made, perhaps, to just* embed the charging in parking lots or parking garages. After all, all cars have to park somewhere, sometime.

* "Just", he sez. Heh.
 

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