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Georgia Power monthly net metering (RNR-monthly)

Enginerd

Member
Jun 24, 2017
375
980
Savannah, GA
Any other Georgia Power solar folks without net metering? I heard that with some meters, when you send power to the grid, the meter isn't smart enough to know which direction the current is flowing, so the meter just counts it as "from grid". This would, of course, be worse than no credit for production... it would be a tax on excess production.
 

darhall993

Member
Jan 24, 2019
149
132
Sandy Springs, GA
Checking in again. I just picked up a PW2 at a good price, and I was thinking about finding another PW2 so that I might have a chance to run my AC if I lose power. Now I'm realizing that since the inverters are integrated into the PW2, if I want to stay below the 10 kW inverter capacity for net metering in Georgia, this means I can't have more than one PW2? If so, bummer. I see there's legislation on the horizon to increase the 10 kW limit to 20 kW. Even with 20 kW, that would prevent me from getting the recommended 3x PW2's (3 x 7.5 > 20) to run my AC. This is so constraining... I'm guessing this is why @n.one.one is bypassing Georgia net metering. I have to run the #'s to see if I should do the same.
Interesting topic for sure.

So, I believe the inverter limit you are speaking of is on the Solar Inverter Generation side of the equation, the key is you can fill up your PW2's and run as backup or during peak rates periods etc. I have 3 PW2's on a property on Lake Hartwell (much smaller home), so its not Georgia Power but certainly adheres to the GA based solar regulations. I can run my 3ton Heat Pump quite easily with my setup overnight even on very hot days but my unit only pulls about 2.7kW during normal operation. The interconnection agreement would have all of those details from GA Power, I believe the 10kW limit (hopefully 20kW soon) is there so GA Power can manage the load during the heavy export hours. So imagine with my 11.4kW inverter I am exporting around 10kW during the early afternoon period the local infrastructure needs to be prepared for that, this all happens after your PW2's are full, so in my case typically by 10:30-11am.

My other home has 400amp service and 10kW generation would certainly help but 20kW would be awesome if you have enough PV generation capacity.

Do you have the GA Power EV rate active at your location? I have that here in my Atlanta home, amazing help from 11pm-7am to run the house on those rates.
 

darhall993

Member
Jan 24, 2019
149
132
Sandy Springs, GA
Any other Georgia Power solar folks without net metering? I heard that with some meters, when you send power to the grid, the meter isn't smart enough to know which direction the current is flowing, so the meter just counts it as "from grid". This would, of course, be worse than no credit for production... it would be a tax on excess production.
AFAIK, you are technically required to have an interconnection agreement with GA Power to grid tie an inverter, and none of solar integrators/electric contractors would install a system without the Interconnection agreement and local permits to do so. Otherwise as you said, all of the backfeed to the grid would be counted as grid supplied, that would be a surprising bill for sure. For me, all GA Power had to do was reprogram my meter with the EV rate plan and it measures differently, it would be something very similar for a new grid tied inverter with Solar.
 

Enginerd

Member
Jun 24, 2017
375
980
Savannah, GA
Now I'm realizing that since the inverters are integrated into the PW2, if I want to stay below the 10 kW inverter capacity for net metering in Georgia, this means I can't have more than one PW2?
I've sorted out my own misunderstanding of the solar + battery architecture. My incorrect understanding was that the PW2 inverters accepted DC solar input, and served as the inverters for the whole system.

Now I understand that the solar inverter is entirely separate from battery storage inverters, and that the PW2 only accepts AC input. I can select the solar inverter at exactly 10 kW to stay within the 10 kW maximum Georgia Power net metering criteria. Then I can have as many PW2 battery inverters as I want... they are not relevant for Georgia Power, since I won't be selling any of the power from my precious batteries to the grid.
 
Checking in again. I just picked up a PW2 at a good price, and I was thinking about finding another PW2 so that I might have a chance to run my AC if I lose power. Now I'm realizing that since the inverters are integrated into the PW2, if I want to stay below the 10 kW inverter capacity for net metering in Georgia, this means I can't have more than one PW2? If so, bummer. I see there's legislation on the horizon to increase the 10 kW limit to 20 kW. Even with 20 kW, that would prevent me from getting the recommended 3x PW2's (3 x 7.5 > 20) to run my AC. This is so constraining... I'm guessing this is why @n.one.one is bypassing Georgia net metering. I have to run the #'s to see if I should do the same.
Where does one find powerwalls for sale? I’d be interested in buying some.
 

snorp

Member
Oct 1, 2019
85
70
Atlanta
I'm considering ordering 8.16 kw panels and 1 PW. Would someone please verify if I'm thinking about this correctly?

Price ~$27K
After tax credits ~$20K
PV Watts shows I would produce ~11K kWh/year valued at ~$1200/year

So my ROI would be over 16 years? Maybe that's more a function of GA having cheap energy compared with say CA? I have the GA Power EV rate and my yearly electricity expenses are only ~$2500, so maybe this just doesn't make sense for me to do?

I'm also confused on the difference between GA Power monthly netting vs. instantaneous netting, but it's a moot point if the ROI is that long.
 

n.one.one

Member
Oct 12, 2014
698
657
Metro Atlanta, GA, USA
I'm considering ordering 8.16 kw panels and 1 PW. Would someone please verify if I'm thinking about this correctly?

Price ~$27K
After tax credits ~$20K
PV Watts shows I would produce ~11K kWh/year valued at ~$1200/year

So my ROI would be over 16 years? Maybe that's more a function of GA having cheap energy compared with say CA? I have the GA Power EV rate and my yearly electricity expenses are only ~$2500, so maybe this just doesn't make sense for me to do?

I'm also confused on the difference between GA Power monthly netting vs. instantaneous netting, but it's a moot point if the ROI is that long.
With regard to whether it makes sense it depends on what your objective is. Your analysis highlights a long payback which is partially due to adding a battery which is expensive. While payback is certainly a factor it's difficult to justify with Georgia's reasonable overall rates and especially with the EV (TOU) rates (but the battery should help with time shifting).

In my case I have power outages on a very regular basis and that's what I was looking to solve rather than justifying the purchase based on payback. My outages range from short blips for unknown reasons, to a few hours if an auto accident knocks down a pole and wires, and occasionally for longer periods from ice storms. I really want to solve these outages and solar plus battery seems like a good solution even though it's still expensive. I've always considered getting a generator but haven't done that because I have neighbors very close and wouldn't want to subject them to the noise. Also, a generator takes slightly longer to kick in which would be a minor issue.

With regard to "GA Power monthly netting vs. instantaneous netting" I think you'll find that with your electricity expenses and 8.16 kw panels you probably wouldn't get a huge benefit from monthly netting. Since the inverter is limited to 10 kw AC I decided to go with more panels since I wouldn't get much benefit from net metering and I wanted as much solar energy as possible for an extended power outage during the worst solar days in December/January.

So...everyone's analysis may be different depending on what benefit they are solving for.
 

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