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Looking to buy used Model S

KodawgRIC

New Member
Mar 16, 2020
2
0
U.S.
Hello.

I am looking to buy a used Tesla Model S (2017 and later). I am looking for any advice on how to proceed forward. I am open to all comments and suggestions. My budget limit is $60K. The only cars I found in that range (and the model year requirement) appear to be the 75D. However, the range, as far as I can tell, is 259 miles (or so) per full charge. The reason I am starting in 2017 is because of the AWD feature.

Does the range much of a difference?
Should I consider upping the budget in order to get more range?


Thank you
 

ragedogg69

Member
Jun 6, 2019
120
120
Buckeye, AZ
These dates are vague but should give you an idea.

Fall 2014 Tesla first introduced Dual Motor AWD and AutoPilot 1.0
April 2016 Model S got rid of the nose cone.
February 2017 starts AP 2.0
August 2017 Starts AP2.5
March 2018 MCU2 starts to replace MCU1
Spring 2019 starts AP3.0 and Raven Performance



I have been browsing Tesla Model S prices for the past 18 months or so on EVCPO.

60, 70,75, 85 Battery variants are usually in the $30,000 to $50,000 range
90 variants usually are $40,000 to $60,000
100 variants are usually $65,000+

Tesla will offer two types of warranty: a four year, 50,000 miles pre-owned limited warranty or a two year, 100,000 miles maximum odometer pre-owned limited warranty

Basically time vs mileage debate. Same original battery and drivetrain warranty on either.

For reference, I bought my nose coned 2016 90D for $45,900 in April of 2019. Tesla had originally listed it at $53,000 and dropped the price over the week before I bought it. Picked it up six days later in Vegas.

This is not set in stone, so I am sure someone will umm actually these data points, but they should help.
 
Last edited:

KodawgRIC

New Member
Mar 16, 2020
2
0
U.S.
These dates are vague but should give you an idea.

Fall 2014 Tesla first introduced Dual Motor AWD and AutoPilot 1.0
April 2016 Model S got rid of the nose cone.
February 2017 starts AP 2.0
August 2017 Starts AP2.5
March 2018 MCU2 starts to replace MCU1
Spring 2019 starts AP3.0 and Raven Performance



I have been browsing Tesla Model S prices for the past 18 months or so on EVCPO.

60, 70,75, 85 Battery variants are usually in the $30,000 to $50,000 range
90 variants usually are $40,000 to $60,000
100 variants are usually $65,000+

Tesla will offer two types of warranty: a four year, 50,000 miles pre-owned limited warranty or a two year, 100,000 miles maximum odometer pre-owned limited warranty

Basically time vs mileage debate. Same original battery and drivetrain warranty on either.

For reference, I bought my nose coned 2016 90D for $45,900 in April of 2019. Tesla had originally listed it at $53,000 and dropped the price over the week before I bought it. Picked it up six days later in Vegas.

This is not set in stone, so I am sure someone will umm actually these data points, but they should help.

Thank you for responding. I was originally going to buy the Tesla from a third party dealer, but I do not believe that is a good idea. My assumption is that all used cars Tesla resells are certified.

Question: Do they offer the 50K or 100K Warranty when you purchase the vehicle? Is it free, but you have to pick one or the other? Is that an extra 50K? Meaning if the car has 51K miles, I am covered until 101K?
 

ragedogg69

Member
Jun 6, 2019
120
120
Buckeye, AZ
Technically, Tesla does not sell "certified," only used with a separate warranty. The warranty offered depends on the vehicle. I believe it is based on the age of the vehicle, but I have never really researched it. Here is a 2015 that has 75,000 miles on its warranty for two years. My 90D came with a 2 year, 47,000 mile warranty. So far I have only had the HVAC compressor replaced, but service treated it as it was a bumper to bumper.

I personally would never buy a Tesla from anyone other than Tesla, but I am sure there are deals out there. Bookmark EV-CPO.com and keep an eye on the configuration that fits your needs. Their filter is amazing for this.
 
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Reactions: EV-CPO

ragedogg69

Member
Jun 6, 2019
120
120
Buckeye, AZ
Also, you had mentioned you have a need of range. First, remember you could have a "full tank" when you leave for your commute every day if charging at home, but also the range you get on your vehicle will vary greatly. This table will give a good idea on what to expect if you are doing 90% of you driving doing 80 mph on the freeway.
 

BlueOvalFan

Member
Mar 17, 2019
165
120
Sacramento, Ca
Hello.

I am looking to buy a used Tesla Model S (2017 and later). I am looking for any advice on how to proceed forward. I am open to all comments and suggestions. My budget limit is $60K. The only cars I found in that range (and the model year requirement) appear to be the 75D. However, the range, as far as I can tell, is 259 miles (or so) per full charge. The reason I am starting in 2017 is because of the AWD feature.

Does the range much of a difference?
Should I consider upping the budget in order to get more range?

Thank you

Range is subjective...my daily commute is 75 miles round trip so when I plug in nightly I’m ready for the next day. You’ll be surprised how nice it is to never visit a gas station. Also, I’ve taken many trips that has required one stop on each leg of the route—if timed with a bathroom break and some chow at the grab & go you won’t even notice the charge time in boosting your SoC by an easy 40%. If you plan on stopping for some sit down eating you can easily fill’er up to 80-90% in less than hour.

If you venture down the Tesla used car buy route, get ready for an adventure. Experiences have varied wildly amongst the forum members. Here’s a link of my experience: Well, I did it...made the CPO plunge for a 2015 P85D!

As for used vs buying direct from Tesla, I wouldn’t touch a used vehicle unless it had a healthy warranty. There are definitely items that can and will go wrong in these cars. Until you get to know your ride you may find an expensive repair bill waiting for you. Here’s my to date SC visit repair log and would guess the below is an easy couple thousand bucks in repairs if I had to pay out of pocket.
SC Visit 1: Rear taillights leaked causing water intrusion in the lift gate (common problem). Repaired via warranty claim
SC Visit 2: Drive door window regulator failed. Repaired via warranty claim
SC Visit 3: Replaced body seal around Door/Window opening due to extreme window noise after window regulator fix. Repaired via warranty claim
Ranger Visit 1: Replace LH rear exterior door handle assembly with gen 3 unit. Repaired via warranty claim
Ranger Visit 2: Repair RH front door handle assembly. Needed new wires harness due to wire fatigue (common problem). Repaired via warranty claim.
 

ragedogg69

Member
Jun 6, 2019
120
120
Buckeye, AZ
Figured I should point out that 85 Battery variants are below $30,000 right now. I have not seen this quantity of Model S below $30,000 with substantial warranty.

~$400 a month gets you over 50,000 miles of warranty for the next two years. If you have a long commute this is a no brainer. Do note these are the rangegate batteries, so DC fast charging may end up being limited and range reduced. Still, a great deal.

2014 Model S | Tesla
2014 Model S | Tesla
 

blodg1

Member
Mar 24, 2020
65
86
Laguna Niguel, CA
Figured I should point out that 85 Battery variants are below $30,000 right now. I have not seen this quantity of Model S below $30,000 with substantial warranty.

~$400 a month gets you over 50,000 miles of warranty for the next two years. If you have a long commute this is a no brainer. Do note these are the rangegate batteries, so DC fast charging may end up being limited and range reduced. Still, a great deal.

2014 Model S | Tesla
2014 Model S | Tesla

I also saw the major discounts this morning. Probably a big push for Q1 revenue. I grabbed a P85 with 30k miles shortly after it dropped from $45,700 to $29,200 around 5AM PDT.
 

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