Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Model Y Range LR Vs Performance

Hasek2

Member
Feb 15, 2021
23
7
06477
I see many LR buyers regret not getting P.

P has Brembo brakes, CF spoiler, metal pedals and a a different motor from the LR. Factor that all in the price is reasonable.

I got a P and couldn't settle for anything slower. I guided my mother to get a LR and that's more than enough for her.
I have read and heard the exact opposite, for most people 4.8 is insanely fast, I got the AB, and its also faster than what most are driving around me today. Many people regret the P for the harsh ride, expensive tires, and here in the north east they have to pay more for winter tires.
 

FOOLSLFDRVNG

Member
Nov 3, 2020
113
73
Los Angeles
I have read and heard the exact opposite, for most people 4.8 is insanely fast, I got the AB, and its also faster than what most are driving around me today. Many people regret the P for the harsh ride, expensive tires, and here in the north east they have to pay more for winter tires.
Most people in the north East would just buy a second set of rims and tires for snow although it is still lowered.

3.5 isn’t even fast enough in California. I’ve already seen Taycans and Urus daily.
 
  • Like
Reactions: olsookie

rubyred

Member
Feb 21, 2020
58
67
USA
I don’t think you can go wrong between the LR and P, but I would offer one data point.

I previously had an M3LR that was an absolutely fantastic car… but once the novelty of the smooth EV power delivery wore off, I really regretted not getting the P.

The 980 motor is the one thing you can’t easily get with a mod or paid software upgrade. Better to spend now on the things you can’t get later, in my mind.
 

LionelHutz

Member
Jan 12, 2019
176
140
CA
You live in Beverly hills or what.

There's silly money almost anywhere near the coast in CA now. Not at all unusual to see exotics and mega-$ SUVs like the Bentayga and Urus. And Teslas are more common than Civics in a lot of areas.

Re: P versus LR, both are plenty fast but the P is noticeably quicker. You just need to balance the cost against your personal FOMO in not getting the top spec.
 

olsookie

Member
Mar 27, 2021
61
33
Penciltuckey
Most people in the north East would just buy a second set of rims and tires for snow although it is still lowered.

3.5 isn’t even fast enough in California. I’ve already seen Taycans and Urus daily.
lol go buy as S plaid+ then…

Comparing a Lambo or Porsche to our 50-60k car is not a comparison. There’s nothing similar about the two cars.
 

Bucksnrt

Member
Apr 21, 2021
20
33
Southern California
I just ordered my first EV a few weeks ago, Model YLR. I was thinking the whole time that I would be getting the P. The I test drove the LR. From a dead stop is less impressive then casually rolling then stepping on it. I was legitimately blown away at that and thought I would save the $10K for an already crazy fast experience. Back in 2012 I had an E90 BMW M3 and has always been my reference. This felt faster from a roll due to the immediate torque (obviously in a straight line and not on a track). By any measure the LR is crazy fast. But there is no denying that the P is stupid fast (in a good way).

As a plus I then found out about the LR AB...highly interested in that!! I am on the West Coast in the IE.
 

73Bruin

Member
Nov 7, 2020
177
82
Torrance, CA
Check out Youtube GJeebs and Kilowatts.
Checked out The Kilowatts youtube, he simply referenced performance brakes. He supplied no data on stopping distances between the two.

There was a model 3 thread on this that was last updated in 2018 that concluded there given the same tires, there was no difference between the stock brakes on the M3 and the "performance" brakes on the M3P. There was a quote from the Brembro FAQ on Page 2

Where can I find test data on stopping distances?

At the speeds that stopping distance is generally measured from (60 to 70mph), the test is primarily testing the tire's grip on the pavement. As delivered from the manufacturer, nearly all vehicles are able to engage the ABS or lock the wheels at these speeds. Therefore, an increase in braking power will do nothing to stop the vehicle in a shorter distance. For this reason, Brembo does not record stopping distances at this time.


The Mountain Pass vendor account on this site, said in that same thread "For sure. Big brakes are about repeatability rather than one-time performance."

Since I and probably most MY owners are not taking their MY out on the track, the question remains what is the stopping distance of the MYP vs the LR AWD? There probably is one due to the stickier tires of the P, but I haven't seen it published. Furthermore if a person if the tires on either model are changed, these stopping distances go out the window.
 

FOOLSLFDRVNG

Member
Nov 3, 2020
113
73
Los Angeles
Checked out The Kilowatts youtube, he simply referenced performance brakes. He supplied no data on stopping distances between the two.

There was a model 3 thread on this that was last updated in 2018 that concluded there given the same tires, there was no difference between the stock brakes on the M3 and the "performance" brakes on the M3P. There was a quote from the Brembro FAQ on Page 2

Where can I find test data on stopping distances?

At the speeds that stopping distance is generally measured from (60 to 70mph), the test is primarily testing the tire's grip on the pavement. As delivered from the manufacturer, nearly all vehicles are able to engage the ABS or lock the wheels at these speeds. Therefore, an increase in braking power will do nothing to stop the vehicle in a shorter distance. For this reason, Brembo does not record stopping distances at this time.


The Mountain Pass vendor account on this site, said in that same thread "For sure. Big brakes are about repeatability rather than one-time performance."

Since I and probably most MY owners are not taking their MY out on the track, the question remains what is the stopping distance of the MYP vs the LR AWD? There probably is one due to the stickier tires of the P, but I haven't seen it published. Furthermore if a person if the tires on either model are changed, these stopping distances go out the window.
I was referring to:

and

At 0:11 seconds on the Kilowatt video, he says "you get larger brakes". I read somewhere for model 3, the LR has a lower performing Brembo or some other brand made in Mexico for the rear brakes. I've seen painted calipers for fronts and rear on LR and they look much smaller than Performance even though the wheel is larger which should give the illusion they are smaller if they were the same size.
 
Last edited:

2101Guy

Active Member
Jan 6, 2020
1,534
1,346
USA
What is sometimes overlooked, is the consistency for Teslas (all Ev's probably) to achive their max acceleration #'s, due to the consistency of electric motor torque production which makes it "easier" for the traction control systems to maximize traction repeatedly. I've been at lights against cars with faster published 0-60's than my wifes LR Y but more often than not, they either A)disabled the traction control and think they can get a faster launch but with nerves/adrenalin, they spin the tires or B)They leave traction control on and the rear wheel drive only powerhouse mustangs have trouble maximizing the grip on streets that arent 100% perfect for traction. Meanwhile, the Y effectively just..takes off/takes the lead and I end up at 50 or 60 before they do. (At which point, Im on a boulevard so I let up off of the accelerator).

Real world vs track and real world vs numbers on a page. Can be a big difference..
 

73Bruin

Member
Nov 7, 2020
177
82
Torrance, CA
I was referring to:

At 0:11 seconds on the Kilowatt video, he says "you get larger brakes". I read somewhere for model 3, the LR has a lower performing Brembo or some other brand made in Mexico for the rear brakes. I've seen painted calipers for fronts and rear on LR and they look much smaller than Performance even though the wheel is larger which should give the illusion they are smaller if they were the same size.

I actually watched both of these videos, before I posted. There was nothing except comments about performance or bigger, no objective data or even subjective comparisons. Oh in the first video he said the red brakes looked cool (~ the 21 minute point)

You are missing the point. And to be honest, I did as well until I got into this thread. Before I made my MYP vs LR purchase decision, I could see that the P's brakes were bigger in the showroom. What I could not find (and still can't) was any data that would show a difference in my driving (and I was most concerned about stopping distance in an emergency). What the M3 thread showed me, was that bigger brakes don't make any difference in a single emergency stopping situation. They do make a difference on a track (or perhaps racing down a mountain road) when you have to break hard repeatedly as you enter each turn. It made me understand that the real difference for normal driving was in the tires. This even made the Tesla Sales Agent's comments about the difference in the brakes being that the ones in the P were red, correct in the context that I was asking about.

And I accept that the P's tires may bring the car to a stop sooner, but I would like to know that difference in 60-0 stopping distance in feet.
 
Last edited:

omegafiler

Member
Oct 25, 2018
29
33
TX
I've historically always opted for the top trim and best performance possible. But after driving both the LR and P, I just couldn't justify the extra $8-$10k increase. This is always a big factor for me in that I have to feel it's "worth" the price, as I was already crossing shopping vehicles that cost much more. The Model 3, on the other hand, had a close pricer gap and handled much more like a vehicle that could really benefit from the extra performance, especially around a corner.

The extra weight of the Y makes it feel like it's the happiest cruising versus treating it like a track car. Unless you are indeed planning on hammering the throttle on a regular basis, and killing your range, the LR is definitely the best choice for most people. You save money, get better range, better ride, less expensive tires, and a bit more side-wall.

Now, if are going to a track (or driving like you are on one) the extra power, bigger brakes, wider rear tire, lower-profile tires, and lower suspension would certainly be beneficial. Although regardless, it is still a steep price that is padding Tesla's bottom line than anything else. For everybody else, Performance upgrades would be mostly negative.

At the end of the day, it's your money, your choice, and I wouldn't hold it against anybody for going one way or the other. But don't let the millions of sensational YouTube videos influence you too much. The 0-60 blasts are great, lots of fun, but for most of us, are nothing more than an expensive party trick. Just ask yourself, what do you really want and need from your EV? Make your choice, enjoy it, and don't look back.
 

mark95476

Active Member
Jun 21, 2020
1,232
646
Bay Area CA
It's a relief not having to worry about having a warm engine, shifting (no gears >> paddle shifting >> rowing gears), and breaking things when I want to go fast.

What is sometimes overlooked, is the consistency for Teslas (all Ev's probably) to achive their max acceleration #'s, due to the consistency of electric motor torque production which makes it "easier" for the traction control systems to maximize traction repeatedly. I've been at lights against cars with faster published 0-60's than my wifes LR Y but more often than not, they either A)disabled the traction control and think they can get a faster launch but with nerves/adrenalin, they spin the tires or B)They leave traction control on and the rear wheel drive only powerhouse mustangs have trouble maximizing the grip on streets that arent 100% perfect for traction. Meanwhile, the Y effectively just..takes off/takes the lead and I end up at 50 or 60 before they do. (At which point, Im on a boulevard so I let up off of the accelerator).

Real world vs track and real world vs numbers on a page. Can be a big difference..
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top