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miracj

2021 Model Y LR AWD
Jul 15, 2021
98
83
Waltham, MA
Attacking the nause from a different direction, consider putting in some coilovers (Unplugged Performance, Mountain Pass Performance or Redwood Motorsports) comfort/GT etc to improve the suspension feel. It might set you back $3k to $5k but should be worth it. But as others say, just don't release the accelerator pedal, let up on it more gently. Get a feel for how fast total release of it is vs letting up on it slowly.
 
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Just to reiterate: that’s not fun and it’s extremely inconvenient.

If I wanted to deal with that kind of crap I would go out and bought a 500HP muscle car!

You realize thats precisely what a MYP is... It's a ~500hp electric muscle car with low profile staggered performance tires and lowered suspension....
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
16,781
22,198
Riverside Co. CA
Attacking the nause from a different direction, consider putting in some coilovers (Unplugged Performance, Mountain Pass Performance or Redwood Motorsports) comfort/GT etc to improve the suspension feel. It might set you back $3k to $5k but should be worth it. But as others say, just don't release the accelerator pedal, let up on it more gently. Get a feel for how fast total release of it is vs letting up on it slowly.

Changing the suspension isnt going to change the fact that it appears the OP, by their own words in this thread, has not learned how to modulate the pedal for regen braking. They also are not interested in changing how they drive, either, again by their own words in this thread.

I doubt the low regen setting is coming back for those cars that dont have it. We dont know for sure, but when it was changed, there was a lot of speculation that it was due to how government regulation tends to work on stuff like this.

What I mean is, if they are using "XXX amount of regen as energy into the battery as algorithm for battery range", but there is an easy toggle switch to turn that regen down, the government would make them use that low setting in all calculations for reported range.

Similar things happen in ICE vehicle land with things like the engine automatically stopping and then re starting every time you come to a stop. My BMWs had that feature (and it was horrible, I hated the engine always stopping in my ICE vehicle at a light, it was panic inducing). They originally had an in car setting where you could defeat it permanently, then they took that away and made it so you had to turn it off every single drive.

It was supposed to save 10% gas usage thus increase the MPG that BMW was quoting. If it was easily defeatable by the owner, BMW couldnt use it to increase the MPG, so they removed the ability to easily defeat it. You had to code it off using software designed for the service technicians to access the vehicle.

There was speculation that regen setting in teslas was a similar situation.

In any case, its been a while since they changed it, so its not likely coming back. OPs choice is go either learn how to drive more smoothly, live with their family complaining, use some sort of third party tool which allows changing this, or sell and find a car which allows them to defeat it.

Driving with smooth regen in these cars is not hard, at least in my opinion, but the OP specifically stated they were not interested in that.
 
When I test drove a MYLR, I didn't like the standard (full) regenerative braking and placed regen on Low. After ordering the car, I learned that Tesla did away with the Low setting and was upset. However, after receiving the car and learning how to drive one-pedal, I now understood where Tesla was coming from. Max regen increases efficiency, thus increasing range. It also reduces wear on brake pads and rotors.

Yup and it also gives you more precise control over the car in traffic and on curvy roads, without having to keep shifting your foot between pedals. Once you get the hang of one pedal driving, there really is no going back, and without it you're really not getting the full benefit of the Tesla drivetrain.
 
We are about to make our summer vacation trip with our son in the backseat of our new MYP, 40 miles out into the trip he started throwing up in the backseat.

I realize that there were a couple of issues at play: my wife was getting a headache from being in the car with its rough deceleration and my son had some sort of virus that led him to have really severe postnasal drip which got complicated by vomiting as he got carsick.

What really confused me was that in the MYP there is no way to turn off regenerative braking.

It literally makes no sense. My M3LR, that I traded in, had the ability to turn regenerative braking to a low setting.

Effectively, if you can’t turn on chill mode, and you can’t turn down regenerative braking, your MYP is kind of useless for passengers As there can continuously be stopped short and then push back into their seat. Certainly it appears to be more of an issue if you can’t turn the harshness of regenerative breaking off…

Anybody else notice as an issue?

and what idiot at Tesla decided this was a good idea?
1. This is not an issue. It lets the driver know when the car is using regenerative braking (good) and when he or she is wasting energy due to having to use the friction brakes (generally bad, if you want to drive efficiently).

2. Turning regenerative braking to a low setting wastes energy. When you press the brake pedal, you are using your friction brakes. There is no such thing as pressing the brake pedal to turn on regenerative braking in a Tesla. If you turn regen to a low level, and are using the brake pedal to stop in lieu of using regen, you are dumping energy into your friction brakes and just creating heat unnecessarily. This will show up in your efficiency statistics (Wh/mi) and in your operating costs, as you have to pay for more kWh to drive the car than you otherwise would. Other companies like Toyota have tried to implement a system where when you press the brake pedal, it first uses regen and as you press it harder, it gradually increases the amount of friction braking if regen cannot be increased further, but this presents two issues. First is the issue described in (1), where the driver has no clue where regen ends and where friction braking begins. And second is that the transition from regen to friction braking is never completely smooth/linear.

3. Chill mode is useless. I had a friend get a MY and I basically told him the same thing in the first week he had the car: all chill mode does is limit the amount of power you can use. It does not benefit you at all. If you want to drive the car like you are mashing the pedal to the floor while in standard mode, you can do this easily: just don't push it in all the way (but if you ever do need the power for any reason, you have easy access to it).

4. I can easily drive my M3 such that it never pushes passengers into their seats or throws them forward -- I just don't push on the accelerator that much, or release it very suddenly.
 
3. Chill mode is useless. I had a friend get a MY and I basically told him the same thing in the first week he had the car: all chill mode does is limit the amount of power you can use. It does not benefit you at all. If you want to drive the car like you are mashing the pedal to the floor while in standard mode, you can do this easily: just don't push it in all the way (but if you ever do need the power for any reason, you have easy access to it).
strongly disagree. One of the problems for the OP is that there is too much power available. Chill mode limits the power and also changes the response of the accelerator. Quite frankly, even in chill mode the car has more power than 95% of the cars on the road so I'd argue that the extra power is useless.

An additional advantage in cold climates is chill mode makes it easier to accelerate gently and avoid slipping.
 
Changing the suspension isnt going to change the fact that it appears the OP, by their own words in this thread, has not learned how to modulate the pedal for regen braking. They also are not interested in changing how they drive, either, again by their own words in this thread.

I doubt the low regen setting is coming back for those cars that dont have it. We dont know for sure, but when it was changed, there was a lot of speculation that it was due to how government regulation tends to work on stuff like this.

What I mean is, if they are using "XXX amount of regen as energy into the battery as algorithm for battery range", but there is an easy toggle switch to turn that regen down, the government would make them use that low setting in all calculations for reported range.

Similar things happen in ICE vehicle land with things like the engine automatically stopping and then re starting every time you come to a stop. My BMWs had that feature (and it was horrible, I hated the engine always stopping in my ICE vehicle at a light, it was panic inducing). They originally had an in car setting where you could defeat it permanently, then they took that away and made it so you had to turn it off every single drive.

It was supposed to save 10% gas usage thus increase the MPG that BMW was quoting. If it was easily defeatable by the owner, BMW couldnt use it to increase the MPG, so they removed the ability to easily defeat it. You had to code it off using software designed for the service technicians to access the vehicle.

There was speculation that regen setting in teslas was a similar situation.

In any case, its been a while since they changed it, so its not likely coming back. OPs choice is go either learn how to drive more smoothly, live with their family complaining, use some sort of third party tool which allows changing this, or sell and find a car which allows them to defeat it.

Driving with smooth regen in these cars is not hard, at least in my opinion, but the OP specifically stated they were not interested in that.
Depending on how prone to motion sickness the OP's son is s/he may need to do more than one upgrade. The problem is, s/he essentially got the worst possible model for motion sickness. The performance has more power meaning the accelerator will be more sensitive and difficult to feather, it has 21" rather than 19" wheels meaning it will have a harsher ride and it has a lower suspension.

Feathering the accelerator will help reduce how much people get thrown fore and aft while improving the suspension will help with the up and down as well as lateral movement. I suspect all of these are contributing.
 
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strongly disagree. One of the problems for the OP is that there is too much power available.
Having that power available does not obligate you to use it. How much you use is entirely up to you when you are the driver, and you have access to the entire range from 0-100% based on how far you press the accelerator.
Chill mode limits the power and also changes the response of the accelerator. Quite frankly, even in chill mode the car has more power than 95% of the cars on the road so I'd argue that the extra power is useless.

An additional advantage in cold climates is chill mode makes it easier to accelerate gently and avoid slipping.
Learn to control your use of the accelerator -- it's not hard. The problem with putting the car in chill mode is that the power is, for all practical purposes in an emergency situation, completely unavailable. You need more than a few seconds to go into the menu and change the settings, and if you're about to get slammed by a vehicle that's ricocheted off the divider or off of another car and you need 100% power to get out of that situation, you're screwed.

The traditional advice about driving on icy roads is to drive like there's an egg between your foot and the pedal. With 1 pedal driving, this switches to driving like there's an egg balanced on your dash and always keeping the accelerator pedal close to the "zero power" balance point. Which honestly isn't too hard to find once you've been driving the car for more than a few hours.
 
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miracj

2021 Model Y LR AWD
Jul 15, 2021
98
83
Waltham, MA
Changing the suspension isnt going to change the fact that it appears the OP, by their own words in this thread, has not learned how to modulate the pedal for regen braking. They also are not interested in changing how they drive, either, again by their own words in this thread.
My point is not that coilovers will take away from the factor of using the single pedal incorrectly, but that a component to the nausea might also be the suspension, which on my MYLR, is rather bumpy, especially in the back seat. Eliminating one may help. But eliminating both would be even better!
 
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Having that power available does not obligate you to use it. How much you use is entirely up to you when you are the driver, and you have access to the entire range from 0-100% based on how far you press the accelerator.

Learn to control your use of the accelerator -- it's not hard. The problem with putting the car in chill mode is that the power is, for all practical purposes in an emergency situation, completely unavailable. You need more than a few seconds to go into the menu and change the settings, and if you're about to get slammed by a vehicle that's ricocheted off the divider or off of another car and you need 100% power to get out of that situation, you're screwed.

The traditional advice about driving on icy roads is to drive like there's an egg between your foot and the pedal. With 1 pedal driving, this switches to driving like there's an egg balanced on your dash and always keeping the accelerator pedal close to the "zero power" balance point. Which honestly isn't too hard to find once you've been driving the car for more than a few hours.
If 0-100 is 300 vs 400hp a given movement of the accelerator will cause less acceleration making it easier to adjust. It’s a mechanical fact and your argument makes no sense.

As far as ‘needing’ the extra power goes, I have never been in a situation where more power would have prevented an accident. That includes years when I was driving a Fire Escort. I have also yet to talk to anyone who has been in such a situation. I’m sure there are occasions where it’s necessary, but they are incredibly rare. There are plenty of times, however where too much power causes problems. (Evident Tesla shouldn’t sell the lower powered LR version because it’s more dangerous not to have the power.)

Your argument is the same as arguing that you shouldn’t wear a seatbelt because it takes you longer to get out of the car if it plunged into a river. Maybe, but the fact is it never happens so it’s not an issue and not a valid argument.
 
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If 0-100 is 300 vs 400hp a given movement of the accelerator will cause less acceleration making it easier to adjust. It’s a mechanical fact and your argument makes no sense.
You're assuming that the accelerator pedal, in standard acceleration mode, is anywhere close to the point where it's not humanly possible to control acceleration because it's way too sensitive. It is nowhere close to this point and I never have problems controlling the amount of acceleration of the vehicle. If you do, get that accelerator pedal checked.
ALs far as ‘needing’ the extra power goes, I have never been in a situation where more power would have prevented an accident.

 
You're assuming that the accelerator pedal, in standard acceleration mode, is anywhere close to the point where it's not humanly possible to control acceleration because it's way too sensitive.
The change in acceleration per millimeter of accelerator movement will be less in chill mode therefore making it easier to control. Your statement is irrelevant.

As for your video, please read my previous post again. Everything I wrote is absolutely correct, whether you agree with it or not.
 
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We are about to make our summer vacation trip with our son in the backseat of our new MYP, 40 miles out into the trip he started throwing up in the backseat.

I realize that there were a couple of issues at play: my wife was getting a headache from being in the car with its rough deceleration and my son had some sort of virus that led him to have really severe postnasal drip which got complicated by vomiting as he got carsick.

What really confused me was that in the MYP there is no way to turn off regenerative braking.

It literally makes no sense. My M3LR, that I traded in, had the ability to turn regenerative braking to a low setting.

Effectively, if you can’t turn on chill mode, and you can’t turn down regenerative braking, your MYP is kind of useless for passengers As there can continuously be stopped short and then push back into their seat. Certainly it appears to be more of an issue if you can’t turn the harshness of regenerative breaking off…

Anybody else notice as an issue?

and what idiot at Tesla decided this was a good idea?
Tesla decided that the driver could control acceleration and deceleration with smooth application of his/her right foot.

Sorry that hasn't worked out for you,

Keith
 
We are about to make our summer vacation trip with our son in the backseat of our new MYP, 40 miles out into the trip he started throwing up in the backseat.

I realize that there were a couple of issues at play: my wife was getting a headache from being in the car with its rough deceleration and my son had some sort of virus that led him to have really severe postnasal drip which got complicated by vomiting as he got carsick.

What really confused me was that in the MYP there is no way to turn off regenerative braking.

It literally makes no sense. My M3LR, that I traded in, had the ability to turn regenerative braking to a low setting.

Effectively, if you can’t turn on chill mode, and you can’t turn down regenerative braking, your MYP is kind of useless for passengers As there can continuously be stopped short and then push back into their seat. Certainly it appears to be more of an issue if you can’t turn the harshness of regenerative breaking off…

Anybody else notice as an issue?

and what idiot at Tesla decided this was a good idea?
You are new to driving a model y performance. Soon you will get better at using the one pedal approach and using brakes when needed. When this happens the deceleration will become much smoother. This was my experience.
 

Pianewman

2021 MYLR VIN 88,XXX, Rd/Wh, 12/20 delivery
Supporting Member
Oct 28, 2020
2,526
2,224
Fort Worth
Not everyone has the ability to control their feet. If we all had similar capability, we could all dance like Fred Astaire, his partner Ginger Rogers (unforgettable quote,paraphrased, "She could do everything he could do, and did it backwards...in heels!") or moonwalk like Michael Jackson.

It's quite possible that the OP just...can't...do...it...I know people that have amazing eye-hand coordination and speed (thinking of some great boxers) but simply couldn't dance around the ring.

I think he bought the wrong car.
 
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DanDi58

Active Member
Jun 22, 2020
2,484
1,994
Dayton NJ
Changing the suspension isnt going to change the fact that it appears the OP, by their own words in this thread, has not learned how to modulate the pedal for regen braking. They also are not interested in changing how they drive, either, again by their own words in this thread.

I doubt the low regen setting is coming back for those cars that dont have it. We dont know for sure, but when it was changed, there was a lot of speculation that it was due to how government regulation tends to work on stuff like this.

What I mean is, if they are using "XXX amount of regen as energy into the battery as algorithm for battery range", but there is an easy toggle switch to turn that regen down, the government would make them use that low setting in all calculations for reported range.

Similar things happen in ICE vehicle land with things like the engine automatically stopping and then re starting every time you come to a stop. My BMWs had that feature (and it was horrible, I hated the engine always stopping in my ICE vehicle at a light, it was panic inducing). They originally had an in car setting where you could defeat it permanently, then they took that away and made it so you had to turn it off every single drive.

It was supposed to save 10% gas usage thus increase the MPG that BMW was quoting. If it was easily defeatable by the owner, BMW couldnt use it to increase the MPG, so they removed the ability to easily defeat it. You had to code it off using software designed for the service technicians to access the vehicle.

There was speculation that regen setting in teslas was a similar situation.

In any case, its been a while since they changed it, so its not likely coming back. OPs choice is go either learn how to drive more smoothly, live with their family complaining, use some sort of third party tool which allows changing this, or sell and find a car which allows them to defeat it.

Driving with smooth regen in these cars is not hard, at least in my opinion, but the OP specifically stated they were not interested in that.
This is a very good point. In Europe, they are having a similar issue with plug-in hybrids (and I suspect the same here). The government has found that people aren't really plugging them in, so the claimed fuel and emissions savings aren't happening irl. So, many countries are eliminating any incentives for purchasing plug-in hybrids. Kyle Conner at Out of Spec reviews just did a video specifically on this issue in Germany, where companies can reimburse their executives for gas costs but not charging costs, so the ones that drive hybrids as company cars tend to never plug them in.
 
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Not everyone has the ability to control their feet. If we all had similar capability, we could all dance like Fred Astaire, his partner Ginger Rogers (unforgettable quote,paraphrased, "She could do everything he could do, and did it backwards...in heels!") or moonwalk like Michael Jackson.

It's quite possible that the OP just...can't...do...it...I know people that have amazing eye-hand coordination and speed (thinking of some great boxers) but simply couldn't dance around the ring.

I think he bought the wrong car.
Op is new to one pedal driving it sounds like. Everyone needs some time to learn before giving up. When my wife took over driving the Model y , she needed about three weeks to get the hang of one pedal driving. Now her Prius is repaired (waited 2 months for catalytic converter) but still finds reasons to drive the MYP 😉.
 

Pianewman

2021 MYLR VIN 88,XXX, Rd/Wh, 12/20 delivery
Supporting Member
Oct 28, 2020
2,526
2,224
Fort Worth
The OP has clearly stated he does not WANT to adjust his driving style. Combined with the possibility that he just CAN'T make the adjustment, I still think he simply bought the wrong car.
My wife refuses to even try, and that's mostly because she just doesn't want to, or need to, so "why bother?".
 
Not everyone has the ability to control their feet.
Exactly. The presumption in this thread is that everyone has great neuromuscular control and great reflexes, a presumption that seems common to those in their 20's and 30's I've come to notice (be warned that in a couple decades you will be disabused of this notion!). Great design of a car like this would have the car adapt to the skills and abilities of the driver, not to insist that everyone train up to the level of the car. Given that it's a pretty simple software problem to spread the acceleration over a greater pedal travel distance, for example, it seems is if it is ideology rather than practicality driving the design choice.

Reading this board in the last year has convinced me that Tesla could really benefit from adding a few crotchety old engineers who live in severe winter climates to their staff to add a perspective that would make the cars better for many of us.
 

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