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SR+ vs LR handling?

Tried my best to get an answer online, but I'm wondering what the difference is between these two cars in normal (dry) conditions?

Obviously, AWD handles differently than RWD. I've owned a bunch of Audi's, and the one time I got a FWD one it was really noticeable. But I haven't heard that about the Tesla...and it's RWD, so that probably makes a big difference.

The bigger battery/motor makes the car substantially heavier (500 pounds)...how does that impact handling? Does the power/awd offset the weight?

FWIW, I just got my SR+ a couple weeks back...I'm having some regrets about not getting the LR...mainly due the Audio. The car is fantastic, and at least here in LA, has more than enough power...frankly, if it were faster I'd be worried about wrapping it around a tree!
 
The LR doesn't turn in as kneenly as the SR. There are an extra 500lbs after all, it simply cannot respond to steering changes quite as quickly. Other than that though, it just feels a lot faster coming out of corners than the SR, not that the SR is slow by any means (especially the ones pre LFP battery). I find the SR really fun in Angeles crest and Mount Wilson road at like 8/10ths of tire grip.

The main issue with the SR is the factory stability programming, there's a power cut based on steering angle, so even though it's RWD, there simply isn't a lot of the RWD at the limit dynamics that you'd expect. At lower speeds this can be countered by turning on "slippery start" mode, this will allow for a bit of wheel spin/tail out driving up to like 30mph or so, but above that the car will continue to cut power even if the wheels aren't slipping/sliding, as long as you're cornering really hard with steering angle that the computer deems unacceptable.

Another issue with the SR is the lack of a rear sway bar. Although this is easily remedied by getting a rear sway bar from an LR with the associated sway bar mounting brackets and links. The SR isn't too understeery stock IMO, but on the limit balance is very much a personal, road, and skill based taste.
 
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Thanks for the detailed response...I live in the canyons of LA, so when I do floor the car I have to apply brakes really fast because its going way too fast for the neighborhood. But compared to my Forester and Outback, the car is like an F1!
IMO the 3SR was a great car in terms of price vs performance when it was $38000-40000 with the NCA battery. At $47000 with the LFP battery, it's a bit slower and an extra 350lbs only serves as a detriment to the fun factor in the twisties.

The only times in the canyon north of LA where I felt like I wanted more power (instead of more visibility) is above 75mph or so, but then again, speed limit up there is like 45-55mph, so unless one's okay with going like 30mph over the limit, how fast could one really drive?
 
IMO the 3SR was a great car in terms of price vs performance when it was $38000-40000 with the NCA battery. At $47000 with the LFP battery, it's a bit slower and an extra 350lbs only serves as a detriment to the fun factor in the twisties.

The only times in the canyon north of LA where I felt like I wanted more power (instead of more visibility) is above 75mph or so, but then again, speed limit up there is like 45-55mph, so unless one's okay with going like 30mph over the limit, how fast could one really drive?
Fortunately, I ordered the car last June so I paid under 40K. Is my car (LFP I assume) that much heavier than the older battery?
 

TomT

Technical Maven
Mar 24, 2014
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735
NE Georgia
@rpiotro There's a big difference in handling between any Model 3 vs a Y. It goes beyond the weight difference as best I can tell. Any Model 3 is fun to drive. The Y is...not as much, to put it delicately.

I've driven the Y a couple of times and I must say that, compared to my 3 LR, it handles like a top-heavy SUV. Not fun.
 
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BigNick

Infamous Fat Sweaty Guy
Dec 3, 2017
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I've driven the Y a couple of times and I must say that, compared to my 3 LR, it handles like a top-heavy SUV. Not fun.
When I drove a loaner X back in late 2017 or so, I didn't get this feeling at all. It felt nearly as planted as my coil-spring 2014 S 85 that I had at the time.
Possibly the air suspension on the X versus the springs on the Y?
 
The SR+ with the NCA battery and 980 motor was the best value IMO. A simple harness activates 6 speakers and a module can unlock the power making it even more fun.

I agree. I would have gotten an original SR+ had I not needed more range.

I ended up getting a used LR RWD because at the time, it had the most range of all of the Model 3s.

To the OP: I have heard that the Dual Motor Model 3s handle differently mainly due to the heavy motor up front. My LR RWD handles wonderfully and I absolutely love the RWD. I drive spirited and the traction control is outstanding as I test it often. Almost two years into ownership with two winters and @60,000 miles. I've never felt the need for a Dual Motor.
 
I've had both, I currently own a 2022 LR AWD and I don't notice a difference. Now I don't track the car, but I do drive some nice curvey roads to work everyday.

On the stereo front, I upgraded by SR+ with TO kit and RF sub and I think it sounded just as good as what I have now, the sub was easily twice as loud...
 

terranx

Member
Aug 29, 2019
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When I drove a loaner X back in late 2017 or so, I didn't get this feeling at all. It felt nearly as planted as my coil-spring 2014 S 85 that I had at the time.
Possibly the air suspension on the X versus the springs on the Y?
I don’t think it’s necessarily the air suspension. I think the Y is just a compromised design. S, X, and 3 were designed from the ground up. The Y on the other hand is essentially a lifted model 3. Turns out a car chassis is not particularly good at being an SUV chassis.

My dad briefly had a MY performance (just sold it yesterday actually), and despite the car being so similar on paper and in looks to my M3P, it’s a night and day difference in driving. The Y’s suspension is poorly damped, it does not feel at all planted around the corners, nor does it feel particularly in control when accelerating through turns. The ride quality was also much worse than the M3P. The model 3 feels like a proper sport sedan. The model Y frankly feels like an economy SUV that happens to be able to accelerate quickly.

He’s taking delivery of an X next week (ordered last year), so we’ll see how that is.
 
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In theory the bulk of the weight should still be pretty low to the ground since the batteries and motors are basically on the floor. But the car just handles and rides like rap.
The ride is a little stiff because it is designed to carry more weight. The handling is not quite the same as the 3 but is responsive enough to save a squirrel's life. Ask me how I know.
 

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