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Thoughts on Yoke from Plaid owner

Couple other things I thought I would highlight during my final days with my model S plaid.

I'm finding more and more that driving with the yoke is truly a two-handed endeavor. I'm saying that it requires two hands to operate it properly. While this might work well with NASCAR or formula 1, I think it's highly impractical for everyday drivers. Yes, I love to have two hands on the wheel but obviously with as much time as we Americans spend driving this is not 100% the case. Again, if you're going to go out for a formula 1 race and dedicate 100% of your attention on the race that you've been preparing for your whole life that's quite a bit different than everyday driving.

In addition, something else I've noticed is that when I do have one hand on a yoke it tends to pull it down substantially. I've almost run into many more curbs already in 4 months then I ever did in my previous BMW 540. The reasons for this are quite simple in my estimation. When you have your right hand on The yoke it simply pulls it down over time with the help of gravity. When you have your left hand on the yoke it also tends to go down pretty quickly as well. When you have two hands on the yoke it is rather hard to predict which hand is going to have more of a downward force over periods of time.

Another thing I've noticed more and more with the driving experience with the yoke is that when you do have two hands on the yoke, as you must, it makes for a very rigid driving position. I find myself in the seat, two hands on a yoke, head back up against the headrest, eyes shifting back and forth between mirrors in a very rigid position. Again, this is probably what you're shooting for if you're a race car driver and you have a couple hours that you need to be at your max performance. I find this rigid position rather ridiculous for everyday driving. I like more of a fluid position that a wheel affords it allows me to move my head around check my blind spots enjoy the scenery a little bit and all this kind of stuff. It's amazing to me how much I'm learning about human ergonomics and mechanics with this yoke. What I'd like to highlight here is it it fundamentally changes the driving experience and the driving position in a way that I find very detrimental to everyday drivers.

Anyway, I'm trading my plaid in on Monday for a model 3 so I only have a couple more days to experience this car. I've had it since March, put about 5,000 mi on it, and have done several long-distance multi-day road trips with it. I'm just writing this in case it is helpful to anybody else that's considering trying to yoke. Initially, I was against buying a model S because of the yoke and then I figured I would give Tesla a try with their engineering record. Obviously I should have gone with my first instinct on this but I'd rather get out now and enjoy a model 3 hoping that Tesla will offer around steering wheel in the future. I hope some of this information is of benefit to people.
 
I will also add that prior to doing long distance multi-day road trips I was a yoke Evangelist! The whole thing came crashing down for me when I put the yoke to the test on long distance trips and tried to get off of autopilot a little bit. Again, if you had talked to me about a month and a half ago I would have told you the yoke was the greatest thing since sliced bread!
 
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Hello, here is a email I just sent to [email protected] in case it is of any value to other owners or potential owners of the Mod S:

Hello, I am an owner of the 2022 Mod S Plaid since Mar 22 and have some feedback after multiple road trips and 5,000 miles.

I am planning on selling my Plaid next week at a 40K loss and buying a Mod 3, which is disappointing because I really like everything about the Plaid minus the yoke. You guys did a really good job on that car.

I have noticed on road trips that the Plaid is the most fatiguing car I have ever driven by far. This is because there is no balance points on the yoke as there is on a 360 degree steering wheel. Also, the driver position can not be easily modified to release blood flow into different parts of the body, as it can with a 360 degree steering wheel.

Over the last Month or so, I have driven my Plaid from Southern CA to WA and from WA to OR several times. It is highly fatiguing to operate manually to the point where I am forced have the autopilot on nearly all the time.

I like the autopilot and I think it does a pretty good job. My problem is that I do not want to be forced into using the autopilot all the time because I can not operate the car in a reasonable or efficient way manually. I was formerly a US Air Force pilot and while automated features such as autopilot are very nice, there is simply no substitute for being able to manually operate the vehicle when needed or wanted. The most dangerous pilots I ever flew with were the ones that had to rely so much on autopilot because there were not very skilled in manually operating the aircraft. Every once in a while the autopilot puts me in a bad position on the road, a position I would not have put myself, and that is going to equate to more accidents over time. This is unacceptable in my opinion. The driver experience becomes exclusively reacting to what the computer is going to do next and this is also fatiguing over long periods of time.

For instance, on my last road trip a couple of days ago, I challenged myself to take the car off autopilot for 5 minutes a couple of time. Within 15 seconds I had the autopilot back on because of how fatiguing the yoke is for long trips. Do you put your hand on the right side? The Left side? Evern worse, do you put you hands on both sides and see which ones weighs do the yoke faster. Also there is no ability so shift driving positions to change blood flow in the body in those positions.

In addition, the car is so much fun to drive and a steering wheel would allow the operator to drive the car more, which is good, enjoyable, and fun with this car.

As stated above, next week I am selling my Plaid at a 40K loss and moving into a Mod 3. I'd really rather not have to do this and I have heard rumblings that a steering wheel replacement option may become available for the Mod S soon. If this it the case, please let me know. I'd hate to sell my Plaid to later find this out because I really like the car otherwise.

As state above, I was a US Air Force pilot for a while so I may have a better sense of human ergonomics and interactions with equipment than most.

Please forward this feedback to the highest level possible and let me know if I can be of further assistance. Thank you for your time, and thank you for helping the world shift to sustainable energy.
Everyone is welcome to their own opinion based on individual experience. In my case, having owned three model S, the yoke is the best part of the experience. I have been disappointed in the full self driving but this is the least fatiguing car I have driven.

Obviously it’s something of personal opinion and I certainly respect yours.
 
I have a feeling trading in my plaid for the model 3 and driving off with the steering wheel is going to be a very liberating experience. It's funny, over the last couple months I've jumped into my mom's 2004 F350 super duty which I used to consider a very uncomfortable ride because it has a short wheel base among other things. Interestingly, shifting from the yoke to that truck made me think that that truck was the most comfortable car ever maybe like a Cadillac almost. It's kind of funny and sad at the same time.

Anyway, I will keep you guys posted as I make the transition from a yoke to a steering wheel in the model 3 and what I'm experiencing.
 
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mswlogo

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I can see what you're saying and I'm sure that applies to 99% of the situations. However, there are those times that I've found I need to throw my blinker on doing a sharp maneuver near a stoplight or something like that and it's just not there. Same thing with the horn I think most of the time it works okay but man when it comes to driving you don't want most of the time. Just one more extra accident can truly ruin or end your life
Horn, I agree. Hopefully they fix that.

Blinker, it’s so rare. There might be some odd case. But I’d argue that it’s in such a complex situation that no one would notice.

Keep in mind sharp turns are fundamentally slow maneuvers. So you have time to find a button and/or it’s not a dangerous situation. Usually.

Maybe you planned to change lane, blinker is on, your in the wrong lane and you already cut the wheel hard. Then you change your mind. you want to turn blinker off. Something like that. You often have extra time, so you can find the button. But it might be a last second thing. The blinker might shut off if you return the wheel not sure if you didn’t actually change a lane.

There, I found a situation that stalks might be better. But chances are nobody will even notice you changed your mind. It’s also rarely a dangerous situation. I’m sure a Yoke hater can come up with one.

Phew, these cases are tricky to come up with aren’t they.

But there are just as many corner cases that keeping your hands on the wheel for less sharp turns is fundamentally safer and way more frequent. No need to take a hand off the wheel to engage blinkers or beep the horn. Hands stay engaged with driving.

You need to have an open mind and not hyper focus on the situations the Yoke might not be as good as round and stalks. Look at it wholistic. Not cherry picking.

For fast critical maneuvers the controls are always under your finger tips.

I wish they put a couple buttons on the back of the wheel closer and not quite as far a reach to the horn and high beam. Yoke version II I guess.

What they could have done is designed it so you can snap in the top half and sell that in the store. That would solve the manufacturing issue. And probably only cost a few $$$ to allow for it. And they would make money on the add on. Could even be heated. Could even offer round or flat top. Maybe that would complicate crash tests.

Lots of things we don’t think of. Offering both wheels might double the cost of crash testing. And Tesla was confident most would prefer the Yoke. And they were right. I’m sure they did user testing.
 
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Another interesting thought I had the other day is that an airplane yoke is shaped rectangularly kind of like the wings on an airplane which are its primary mode of transportation. The wheel on an automobile is shaped like it's wheels, it's primary mode of transportation. I wonder if this is purely coincidental or if there are substantial mechanical and human ergonomic considerations with these interfaces.
 

mswlogo

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Everyone is welcome to their own opinion based on individual experience. In my case, having owned three model S, the yoke is the best part of the experience. I have been disappointed in the full self driving but this is the least fatiguing car I have driven.

Obviously it’s something of personal opinion and I certainly respect yours.
If I’m driving one handed. AutoPilot is on. Period. Or around town I might be driving “actively” with one hand (not resting it on the wheel).

If it’s “lazy enough” (that’s not meant to be a negative comment). That I drift from the weight of my hand. AutoPilot is on. That is your conflict.

You are correct. There is no “lazy manual” mode. And for most, that’s not a problem.

But for the umpteenth time. That is very fixable. Stalks are not so easy to change back to legacy. But the wheel roundness can be adjusted. Cheaply, quickly and easily if you are so inclined. But your not so why harp on that. We get your point.
 
I'm about to pick up my new Model S this week, but I understand the OP's dilemma. A lot of people on here are saying that "you'll get used to the yoke after you drive it". And then when people end up not liking the yoke after buying it and spending time driving it, they're asked "why did you buy the car then?". I haven't found a place to test drive or Turo a yoke-equipped model, unfortunately, and the 7-day return period no longer exists. So we kinda have to take a leap of faith and hope these very important and non-standard user interface changes work out.

I also joined this site to learn more about replacing the yoke, but after hearing everybody tell me I'll like it after a while of driving, I'm not worried. I mean, it still seems a bit odd that I have to spend time getting used to a new design that will still seem to have no real benefits, but I assume everybody here would agree the Model S is worth it, right?

As a slight tangent, I think I talked to the Tesla employee who delivered your car to you, @Plaid to Mod 3? We were actually discussing the yoke, and he mentioned that he had to deliver one to Wenatchee. While he found the yoke strange at first, he realized he could place his hands on the bottom bar and started liking it more. That said, with all the talk about safe hand placement for airbag deployment, I would imagine this hand position would be as dangerous as anything: wouldn't this cause a deploying airbag to basically lock your hands onto the wheel and--depending on how much force airbags have--snap your wrists or even your forearm bones? So we're kinda left with only using 9 and 3, and with the yoke handles' strange ergonomics, that doesn't seem very comfortable for me when testing the car. But again, I'm gonna be hopeful that the car won't be a (literal?) pain to drive.

I don't think anybody is going to change opinions on here with words, so I'm guessing a lot of these continuing arguments are from people who are getting defensive about the (relatively expensive) car decisions they've made, which I understand. But whether you actually like or dislike large design changes like the yoke/buttons is something you kinda have to experience and then--based on all sorts of life-specific things--come to a personal decision on. I've heard both sides claim that the majority hates/likes the yoke, though without any stats or numbers. I do see a lot of reviews panning it, and even professional drivers like Pobst disliking it. Then there are 3/Y drivers installing it into their cars, even though they have no dash display to see better...I'm just on here in case I end up disliking it so I can install an alternative so I can keep what should be an otherwise cool car.

All that said..........I'm a little sad that the brand new car I'll be picking up this week is already out-of-date. Apparently there's already another refresh coming out with new wheel designs. People were having issues seeing the brake calipers, so they created a revolutionary new design that is supposed to similarly revolutionize the auto industry (once again). Not only that, but Elon apparently thought that having brake pedals on a car was ugly, so they're now putting sleek capacitance brake buttons on the wheels themselves:
1656294975241.png


Relax, it's a joke (I think?). Enjoy your cars, everybody.
 
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I'm about to pick up my new Model S this week, but I understand the OP's dilemma. A lot of people on here are saying that "you'll get used to the yoke after you drive it". And then when people end up not liking the yoke after buying it and spending time driving it, they're asked "why did you buy the car then?". I haven't found a place to test drive or Turo a yoke-equipped model, unfortunately, and the 7-day return period no longer exists. So we kinda have to take a leap of faith and hope these very important and non-standard user interface changes work out.

I also joined this site to learn more about replacing the yoke, but after hearing everybody tell me I'll like it after a while of driving, I'm not worried. I mean, it still seems a bit odd that I have to spend time getting used to a new design that will still seem to have no real benefits, but I assume everybody here would agree the Model S is worth it, right?

As a slight tangent, I think I talked to the Tesla employee who delivered your car to you, @Plaid to Mod 3? We were actually discussing the yoke, and he mentioned that he had to deliver one to Wenatchee. While he found the yoke strange at first, he realized he could place his hands on the bottom bar and started liking it more. That said, with all the talk about safe hand placement for airbag deployment, I would imagine this hand position would be as dangerous as anything: wouldn't this cause a deploying airbag to basically lock your hands onto the wheel and--depending on how much force airbags have--snap your wrists or even your forearm bones? So we're kinda left with only using 9 and 3, and with the yoke handles' strange ergonomics, that doesn't seem very comfortable for me when testing the car. But again, I'm gonna be hopeful that the car won't be a (literal?) pain to drive.

I don't think anybody is going to change opinions on here with words, so I'm guessing a lot of these continuing arguments are from people who are getting defensive about the (relatively expensive) car decisions they've made, which I understand. But whether you actually like or dislike large design changes like the yoke/buttons is something you kinda have to experience and then--based on all sorts of life-specific things--come to a personal decision on. I've heard both sides claim that the majority hates/likes the yoke, though without any stats or numbers. I do see a lot of reviews panning it, and even professional drivers like Pobst disliking it. Then there are 3/Y drivers installing it into their cars, even though they have no dash display to see better...I'm just on here in case I end up disliking it so I can install an alternative so I can keep what should be an otherwise cool car.

All that said..........I'm a little sad that the brand new car I'll be picking up this week is already out-of-date. Apparently there's already another refresh coming out with new wheel designs. People were having issues seeing the brake calipers, so they created a revolutionary new design that is supposed to similarly revolutionize the auto industry (once again). Not only that, but Elon apparently thought that having brake pedals on a car was ugly, so they're now putting sleek capacitance brake buttons on the wheels themselves:
View attachment 821551

Relax, it's a joke (I think?). Enjoy your cars, everybody.
I'm about to pick up my new Model S this week, but I understand the OP's dilemma. A lot of people on here are saying that "you'll get used to the yoke after you drive it". And then when people end up not liking the yoke after buying it and spending time driving it, they're asked "why did you buy the car then?". I haven't found a place to test drive or Turo a yoke-equipped model, unfortunately, and the 7-day return period no longer exists. So we kinda have to take a leap of faith and hope these very important and non-standard user interface changes work out.

I also joined this site to learn more about replacing the yoke, but after hearing everybody tell me I'll like it after a while of driving, I'm not worried. I mean, it still seems a bit odd that I have to spend time getting used to a new design that will still seem to have no real benefits, but I assume everybody here would agree the Model S is worth it, right?

As a slight tangent, I think I talked to the Tesla employee who delivered your car to you, @Plaid to Mod 3? We were actually discussing the yoke, and he mentioned that he had to deliver one to Wenatchee. While he found the yoke strange at first, he realized he could place his hands on the bottom bar and started liking it more. That said, with all the talk about safe hand placement for airbag deployment, I would imagine this hand position would be as dangerous as anything: wouldn't this cause a deploying airbag to basically lock your hands onto the wheel and--depending on how much force airbags have--snap your wrists or even your forearm bones? So we're kinda left with only using 9 and 3, and with the yoke handles' strange ergonomics, that doesn't seem very comfortable for me when testing the car. But again, I'm gonna be hopeful that the car won't be a (literal?) pain to drive.

I don't think anybody is going to change opinions on here with words, so I'm guessing a lot of these continuing arguments are from people who are getting defensive about the (relatively expensive) car decisions they've made, which I understand. But whether you actually like or dislike large design changes like the yoke/buttons is something you kinda have to experience and then--based on all sorts of life-specific things--come to a personal decision on. I've heard both sides claim that the majority hates/likes the yoke, though without any stats or numbers. I do see a lot of reviews panning it, and even professional drivers like Pobst disliking it. Then there are 3/Y drivers installing it into their cars, even though they have no dash display to see better...I'm just on here in case I end up disliking it so I can install an alternative so I can keep what should be an otherwise cool car.

All that said..........I'm a little sad that the brand new car I'll be picking up this week is already out-of-date. Apparently there's already another refresh coming out with new wheel designs. People were having issues seeing the brake calipers, so they created a revolutionary new design that is supposed to similarly revolutionize the auto industry (once again). Not only that, but Elon apparently thought that having brake pedals on a car was ugly, so they're now putting sleek capacitance brake buttons on the wheels themselves:
View attachment 821551

Relax, it's a joke (I think?). Enjoy your cars, everybody.
Nah that was not me I received delivery of my car in Southern California
 

mswlogo

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Aug 27, 2018
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MA, NH
Oh if you are driving one handed so
I'm about to pick up my new Model S this week, but I understand the OP's dilemma. A lot of people on here are saying that "you'll get used to the yoke after you drive it". And then when people end up not liking the yoke after buying it and spending time driving it, they're asked "why did you buy the car then?". I haven't found a place to test drive or Turo a yoke-equipped model, unfortunately, and the 7-day return period no longer exists. So we kinda have to take a leap of faith and hope these very important and non-standard user interface changes work out.

I also joined this site to learn more about replacing the yoke, but after hearing everybody tell me I'll like it after a while of driving, I'm not worried. I mean, it still seems a bit odd that I have to spend time getting used to a new design that will still seem to have no real benefits, but I assume everybody here would agree the Model S is worth it, right?

As a slight tangent, I think I talked to the Tesla employee who delivered your car to you, @Plaid to Mod 3? We were actually discussing the yoke, and he mentioned that he had to deliver one to Wenatchee. While he found the yoke strange at first, he realized he could place his hands on the bottom bar and started liking it more. That said, with all the talk about safe hand placement for airbag deployment, I would imagine this hand position would be as dangerous as anything: wouldn't this cause a deploying airbag to basically lock your hands onto the wheel and--depending on how much force airbags have--snap your wrists or even your forearm bones? So we're kinda left with only using 9 and 3, and with the yoke handles' strange ergonomics, that doesn't seem very comfortable for me when testing the car. But again, I'm gonna be hopeful that the car won't be a (literal?) pain to drive.

I don't think anybody is going to change opinions on here with words, so I'm guessing a lot of these continuing arguments are from people who are getting defensive about the (relatively expensive) car decisions they've made, which I understand. But whether you actually like or dislike large design changes like the yoke/buttons is something you kinda have to experience and then--based on all sorts of life-specific things--come to a personal decision on. I've heard both sides claim that the majority hates/likes the yoke, though without any stats or numbers. I do see a lot of reviews panning it, and even professional drivers like Pobst disliking it. Then there are 3/Y drivers installing it into their cars, even though they have no dash display to see better...I'm just on here in case I end up disliking it so I can install an alternative so I can keep what should be an otherwise cool car.

All that said..........I'm a little sad that the brand new car I'll be picking up this week is already out-of-date. Apparently there's already another refresh coming out with new wheel designs. People were having issues seeing the brake calipers, so they created a revolutionary new design that is supposed to similarly revolutionize the auto industry (once again). Not only that, but Elon apparently thought that having brake pedals on a car was ugly, so they're now putting sleek capacitance brake buttons on the wheels themselves:
View attachment 821551

Relax, it's a joke (I think?). Enjoy your cars, everybody.
I don’t think one person said why did you buy it in the first place. I think everyone understands that. Especially where it takes a good amount of miles to learn if you can adapt or not. And just renting one, if you could isn’t enough time. I tried to rent, but nothing in my area. Glad I didn’t because I might have judged poorly in a short time with it.

A lot of folks said why don’t you try and fix it, since his biggest hang up, in the opening post, was he could not balance his hand on the top or bottom of the wheel (I mean Yoke) when not on AutoPilot.

But he chooses to not to go that route either.

Hope you like the Yoke, if, not there are options to fix the wheel. But not really address the stalks.

I think most agree the horn can be bad. And many think anyone can eventually adapt to the blinkers. But some think they are a constant safety risk. I respectfully disagree with that.
 
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Wol747

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On a roundabout the wheel is probably turned about ~20 degrees (guess), not 180, not enough to have issues for geometry challenged operators to hit the blinker buttons. Maybe you can’t handle the blinker on the wheel at that angle, but most can. Hint: the buttons are still under your thumb.

Let’s stop making up issues that don’t exist.

OP has a valid argument. Even though he is complaining he can’t improperly use the a wheel like many people do.

He also complained that most 3rd party wheels you can’t balance your hand on top because they are flat. I’d argue it’s easier. But folks just keep making up issues that don’t exist. There are round wheels too. But that gets no response.

Then there are void warranty concerns. Those are certainly legit. I was worried about that when checking out wheels before picking up my S. But there was a solution for that too that adds just the top half without touching electronics, airbag or removing old wheel. It’s ugly and not heated. But if it was a serious issue and I otherwise loved the car, that was my backup plan to try first.

Oh and let’s not forget it’s to much to “mess with” to change the wheel. That add on top half wheel looks like it would take no more than 30 minutes. I’m sure it’s a whole more involved with selling and buying another car.

Also if I was losing $40K my concerns about warranty issues would definitely be down in priority.

Here is the wheel I was gonna get if I needed it.

>>Let’s stop making up issues that don’t exist.<<

I don't know why I bother, because I would never buy a car with a yoke anyway.
However, your post rather demonstrates the US-centric view of the world: mini roundabouts are common in most other countries and I can assure you that a 20 degree turn of the wheel/yoke would not come anywhere close to negotiating one! Many require full- or near full-lock. This puts the blinker buttons in all sorts of positions just at the point where you are required to change to the "exit" indication.
The whole POINT of roundabouts is to slow traffic to a crawl so as to allow vehicles to filter into slow moving traffic, and in order to make it safe and expedite the filtering you should indicate the intention to exit after passing any previous exit and before reaching the one you intend to take.
After using yokes for 35 years I am well aware of the ergonomics: what works for airplanes isn't IMHO the answer to a non-existent problem in cars.
Let's face it: the only "valid" reason for swapping a wheel for a yoke in a car is to pander to the "it's cool" brigade. I can't think offhand of a single other reason - even the visibility argument doesn't hold much water.
 
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WilliamG

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>>Let’s stop making up issues that don’t exist.<<

I don't know why I bother, because I would never buy a car with a yoke anyway.
However, your post rather demonstrates the US-centric view of the world: mini roundabouts are common in most other countries and I can assure you that a 20 degree turn of the wheel/yoke would not come anywhere close to negotiating one! Many require full- or near full-lock. This puts the blinker buttons in all sorts of positions just at the point where you are required to change to the "exit" indication.
The whole POINT of roundabouts is to slow traffic to a crawl so as to allow vehicles to filter into slow moving traffic, and in order to make it safe and expedite the filtering you should indicate the intention to exit after passing any previous exit and before reaching the one you intend to take.
After using yokes for 35 years I am well aware of the ergonomics: what works for airplanes isn't IMHO the answer to a non-existent problem in cars.
Let's face it: the only "valid" reason for swapping a wheel for a yoke in a car is to pander to the "it's cool" brigade. I can't think offhand of a single other reason - even the visibility argument doesn't hold much water.
As a 6’5” driver the visibility aspect is certainly there. That said for much of the world with roundabouts the yoke is going to be awful. I said as much in one of my other posts discussing e.g. the UK (grew up driving in London). The yoke will be a disaster there.
 
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mswlogo

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>>Let’s stop making up issues that don’t exist.<<

I don't know why I bother, because I would never buy a car with a yoke anyway.
However, your post rather demonstrates the US-centric view of the world: mini roundabouts are common in most other countries and I can assure you that a 20 degree turn of the wheel/yoke would not come anywhere close to negotiating one! Many require full- or near full-lock. This puts the blinker buttons in all sorts of positions just at the point where you are required to change to the "exit" indication.
The whole POINT of roundabouts is to slow traffic to a crawl so as to allow vehicles to filter into slow moving traffic, and in order to make it safe and expedite the filtering you should indicate the intention to exit after passing any previous exit and before reaching the one you intend to take.
After using yokes for 35 years I am well aware of the ergonomics: what works for airplanes isn't IMHO the answer to a non-existent problem in cars.
Let's face it: the only "valid" reason for swapping a wheel for a yoke in a car is to pander to the "it's cool" brigade. I can't think offhand of a single other reason - even the visibility argument doesn't hold much water.
I don't know what a mini roundabout is. But pretty much any time I turn the wheel enough that I might lose orientation of the buttons (because I need to lose my grip), I'm stopped (that's usually parking, 3 point turns, or about to make a hard right turn after stopping and turning on the blinker ahead of time). If I'm moving along, turns are less aggressive.

My understanding is with any roundabout the idea is to keep moving. Meaning I doubt you are turning the wheel enough that you can't manage the blinkers while in it.

Ok, I looked it up. Maybe not the perfect example, but I never saw the driver turn the wheel more than 1/4 turn (typically a lot less than even that). Also the commentary said blinkers are not required to exit the mini round about. You can if you wish. Not saying she is right or wrong. But makes sense.

All pretty gentle turns. Again making up problems where they don't exist by mostly people that don't even own one.


It actually makes sense to use a blinker to exit a rotary on a larger US rotary than what I see for the Mini roundabout because you announce your intention of where you want to go as you enter the mini roundabout. But on a large rotary in the US that would be confusing. There is no choice as you enter and a blinker isn't going to be clear of your intensions before you enter. But it could help just before exiting. Honestly I'm not sure what I do, all muscle memory. Which might be, I do nothing. I'll have to review next time. My guess is, it's case by case and I dod what everyone else is doing.
 
I don’t think one person said why did you buy it in the first place.

Maybe I read/inferred these wrong. Or maybe you meant literally one instance?

1656308310246.png

1656308334001.png


But I noticed arguing with some on here is...pointless.

And yes, I'm also personally worried about roundabouts. I like using my blinkers to convey my driving intentions, and I'd rather use my limited brain cycles to focus on driving, not figuring out where those pesky blinker buttons went.

Oops, sorry...Positive thoughts! The yoke is gonna be awesome, the buttons are gonna be awesome, I don't need to use the horn....Positive thoughts!
 

mswlogo

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7,594
MA, NH
Maybe I read/inferred these wrong. Or maybe you meant literally one instance?

View attachment 821610
View attachment 821611

But I noticed arguing with some on here is...pointless.

And yes, I'm also personally worried about roundabouts. I like using my blinkers to convey my driving intentions, and I'd rather use my limited brain cycles to focus on driving, not figuring out where those pesky blinker buttons went.

Oops, sorry...Positive thoughts! The yoke is gonna be awesome, the buttons are gonna be awesome, I don't need to use the horn....Positive thoughts!
Ok I missed that one.

Rotaries are about the least concern you should have.
 

Wol747

Active Member
Aug 26, 2017
1,601
940
Tea Gardens
As a 6’5” driver the visibility aspect is certainly there. That said for much of the world with roundabouts the yoke is going to be awful. I said as much in one of my other posts discussing e.g. the UK (grew up driving in London). The yoke will be a disaster there.
Just so our American friends know what goes on in other countries (and I'm certainly not advocating these, but they are there, have to be negotiated and signalling is critical from one mini to the next):



https://www.reddit.com/r/drones/comments/6eo1kd
 

Wol747

Active Member
Aug 26, 2017
1,601
940
Tea Gardens
A quick Google for the Florida and the Michigan drivers' handbook - and I would hazard a guess other states - shows the requirement to indicate before leaving the roundabout.
I'm really surprised that so many here seem to think indicating in these situations is a trivial matter and that those who keep bringing it up are fruitcakes.
Another potential danger of the yoke is when the car is on autopilot: there are many videos of the wheel/yoke gyrating wildly when beta is uncertain of the best route. A wheel can be allowed to slip through the hands yet still be instantly held whatever its position: unless a yoke is held as it flies around its position and orientation is not instinctively known in an emergency.
We will find out in time.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
8,102
7,594
MA, NH
A quick Google for the Florida and the Michigan drivers' handbook - and I would hazard a guess other states - shows the requirement to indicate before leaving the roundabout.
I'm really surprised that so many here seem to think indicating in these situations is a trivial matter and that those who keep bringing it up are fruitcakes.
Another potential danger of the yoke is when the car is on autopilot: there are many videos of the wheel/yoke gyrating wildly when beta is uncertain of the best route. A wheel can be allowed to slip through the hands yet still be instantly held whatever its position: unless a yoke is held as it flies around its position and orientation is not instinctively known in an emergency.
We will find out in time.
It doesn’t take a math genius to see a wheel will NOT be turning more than probably 20 degrees in a massive rotary like your showing. You be very smooth and relaxed maneuver. Perhaps you make it more punishing with your driving habits.

You get to keep your hands closer to the blinkers while they stay on the wheel as you navigate.

so many? I think I’m the only one that has quested signaling on exiting mini roundabouts. I reiterated what video I found said. That you DON’T.

Large roundabouts I honestly forget. Been driving to long. It’s like riding a bike. I don’t even think about it. I’m being honest. I always signal and I don’t deal with many round abouts.

And I don’t make stuff up to justify not upgrading to the refresh.

Wasting to much time here reading made up BS and not enjoying a nice drive.

Enjoy your legacy wheel.
 
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