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Thoughts on Yoke from Plaid owner

WilliamG

Hinge Fanatic
Apr 20, 2019
6,744
10,647
Seattle, WA
Because the most important thing for me to be looking at while driving a 1,020hp vehicle is an expanse of black plastic? Yep, you sold me. Yoke all the way.

@WilliamG if you want the thread to die, you have to stop posting in it :)
I know. I know… but… how do I request the death if I can’t post? Damned if I do…
 
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I've been driving my Plaid for 15 months and 22,400+ miles, which includes several all-day trips. I found the yoke to be comfortable on cruise using the lower part to rest one hand to let the car know my hand is there. I too was an Air Force pilot, and instructor in 3 fighter types. What I determined is on autopilot, which I've been using since it was released in 2015, it was subtle for me, but I looked away from the road at longer and longer increments over time. Transitioning to manual driving is not difficult for a few minutes, but then I found myself drifting in my lane and having to make larger corrections than I ever did without an autopilot. Now the car warns if I look away from the road for too long. Bottom line is the autopilot can lull one into a sense of security over time and the skill of manual driving is slowly eroded.
 
I've been driving my Plaid for 15 months and 22,400+ miles, which includes several all-day trips. I found the yoke to be comfortable on cruise using the lower part to rest one hand to let the car know my hand is there. I too was an Air Force pilot, and instructor in 3 fighter types. What I determined is on autopilot, which I've been using since it was released in 2015, it was subtle for me, but I looked away from the road at longer and longer increments over time. Transitioning to manual driving is not difficult for a few minutes, but then I found myself drifting in my lane and having to make larger corrections than I ever did without an autopilot. Now the car warns if I look away from the road for too long. Bottom line is the autopilot can lull one into a sense of security over time and the skill of manual driving is slowly eroded.
So what can be inferred is that when the ADAS can’t work and gives up control, the driver is less able to react quickly or adequately as more time passes.
 
Imagine that there were similar discussions when the first automobiles transitioned from tiller stearing to round wheel. No longer could you intuitively tell when your steering device was pointed straight ahead, left or right, or partially in between. With a tiller you could always know exactly the direction and how much you were turning. As a back up, you could always just look at where the front wheels were positioned. The addition of fenders and a wheel made your direction always uncertain. For those used to riding a horse, or in a buggy it must have also been an uncomfortable transition.
 

mspohr

Well-Known Member
Jul 27, 2014
11,819
15,644
California
I've been driving my Plaid for 15 months and 22,400+ miles, which includes several all-day trips. I found the yoke to be comfortable on cruise using the lower part to rest one hand to let the car know my hand is there. I too was an Air Force pilot, and instructor in 3 fighter types. What I determined is on autopilot, which I've been using since it was released in 2015, it was subtle for me, but I looked away from the road at longer and longer increments over time. Transitioning to manual driving is not difficult for a few minutes, but then I found myself drifting in my lane and having to make larger corrections than I ever did without an autopilot. Now the car warns if I look away from the road for too long. Bottom line is the autopilot can lull one into a sense of security over time and the skill of manual driving is slowly eroded.
I've found that freeway driving with AP allows me to devote more of my attention to my wider surroundings since I don't have to stay focused on the lines and continuously make fine adjustments to steering. I'm more aware of cars to the side and behind as well as front. Driving is less tedious.
 
I've found that freeway driving with AP allows me to devote more of my attention to my wider surroundings since I don't have to stay focused on the lines and continuously make fine adjustments to steering. I'm more aware of cars to the side and behind as well as front. Driving is less tedious.
I still do not trust the AP when there is no shoulder but concrete barrier. Also when the lane splits into two, i.e. left lane picks up another freeway and right lane stays on, the car does not know which one to take. Scary when your attention is to something else.
 
I still do not trust the AP when there is no shoulder but concrete barrier. Also when the lane splits into two, i.e. left lane picks up another freeway and right lane stays on, the car does not know which one to take. Scary when your attention is to something else.

i've noticed same on highways in Dallas. I have gotten used to the Yoke and don't understand the dislikes
 
Obviously their thought process if flawed. I can say at this point after driving with the wheel, if I had to go back to the yoke, I would sell the car and buy something else. I would argue that the most important control input for the car is the wheel. The fact that they effed this up so badly with almost no benefit by going with the yoke, shows me that some of their priorities are truly skewed or their decision making is truly flawed.

The fact that they are putting the yoke on the cyber truck really makes me question how well they understand the role of a truck. They will get the heck flamed out of them once somebody has to park a trailer dealing with this abomination for control inputs.

Hands down I'd buy the F150 over the Cyber Truck. Ford will get the "truck" part right. I have absolutely no faith in Tesla regarding this. The CT may look cool but the Ford will likely just plain work like a truck should. I think Tesla announced way in advance of Ford for an electric truck but Ford beat them by a mile to market.

If Tesla keeps on the path they are, in a decade they could easily be old news. The competition is quickly catch up. If you are going to be on the cutting edge of design decisions, you better get them mostly right, and the key ones you absolutely have to get them 100% right. If the yoke was such an amazing control input, it would be on the 3/Y's right now.
Competition may eventually catch up, but I can tell you at least in the Greater Boston area, Tesla owns this market, by like a 10 to 1 ratio against all other EV's on the road. On saturday alone, I must have seen at least 30-40 Tesla's in one area of a shopping plaza. I saw maybe 4 non-Tesla EV's in that same area. It's not even close at this point.
 
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Obviously the big problem with this whole thing is that it's nearly impossible to test drive any Tesla, and even more challenging to test drive a model S with a yoke. That being said, many people have to make this decision no experience at all, unfortunately. Besides, I think it takes thousands of miles in all kinds of different driving situations to really understand the yoke in all of it shortcomings, so even if the test drive seems to go well I don't think that that's going to be the end of the story for many people, unfortunately.
Are there any Tesla's on Turo in your area? In the future, I plan on using them to test drive any vehicle I am thinking to buy.
 
Competition may eventually catch up, but I can tell you at least in the Greater Boston area, Tesla owns this market, by like a 10 to 1 ratio against all other EV's on the road. On saturday alone, I must have seen at least 30-40 Tesla's in one area of a shopping plaza. I saw maybe 4 non-Tesla EV's in that same area. It's not even close at this point.
The same scenario is in CA which is the capital of Tesla. The reason is a lack of viable competition. In a few years, when most EV are caught up with the battery range and surpassed Tesla's QC, the ration will change. If Tesla stops messy around with the cute things and concentrate on better customer support and quality, their throne will soon be overthrown.
 

David29

Active Member
Supporting Member
Aug 1, 2015
2,487
2,132
DEDHAM, MA
Competition may eventually catch up, but I can tell you at least in the Greater Boston area, Tesla owns this market, by like a 10 to 1 ratio against all other EV's on the road. On saturday alone, I must have seen at least 30-40 Tesla's in one area of a shopping plaza. I saw maybe 4 non-Tesla EV's in that same area. It's not even close at this point.
I am also in the Boston area, and I agree, but with one caveat: Teslas are very easy to spot, whereas many other EVS either look like their manufacturer's ICE vehicles, or just don't look distinctive enough to catch my eye out of the hundreds of other models on the road. As examples, I can never seem to distinguish Porsche Taycans from the Panamera, nor can I ever be sure if a big Audi SUV is a E-tron or the G5, they look so similar. So there may be more EVs around here than I notice.
 
I am also in the Boston area, and I agree, but with one caveat: Teslas are very easy to spot, whereas many other EVS either look like their manufacturer's ICE vehicles, or just don't look distinctive enough to catch my eye out of the hundreds of other models on the road. As examples, I can never seem to distinguish Porsche Taycans from the Panamera, nor can I ever be sure if a big Audi SUV is a E-tron or the G5, they look so similar. So there may be more EVs around here than I notice.
That's a good point as well. VW ID.4 come to mind as very anonymous looking EV's.
 
With the yoke, and terribly frustrating customer service - I just want _any other reasonable EV_ as my next car.

However, the regular updates ("the cute stuff" as mentioned above); the range, and the existing state of tech -> the competition is simply too far behind. Rivian is likely the most worthy competitor, and my likely future vehicle whenever they can get to my R1S; but since they also don't have CarPlay; I'm still not satisfied with the near term options.

An ID.Buzz with Carplay, decent range, and some cool first party accessories may be it. I'm hopeful.
 

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