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Tire inflator recommendation

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by electric_feel, Jul 7, 2016.

  1. electric_feel

    electric_feel The Electric Baron

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    Can anyone give a recommendation on a good tire inflator that plugs into the 12V connection? Particularly, I like the ones that let you set the desired PSI so I don't have to babysit adding air to each tire. If it's part of a tire repair kit, even better.

    Also, how close to the max PSI do you inflate your tires? The Goodyear tires on my Model S list a max PSI of 51.
     
  2. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    I just bought a VIAIR 85P 12V air compressor.

    OEM Michelins with 54,000 miles will get replaced at month end with OEM Goodyears (Eagle RS A-2). Given the pros and cons of the latter, I figure an air compressor and plug kit will be a good idea. I thought the Tesla product would be good until they couldn't t provide specs and also told me that once the inline can of slime is used, there are no replacements available. A design flaw, they called it.

    Which Goodyears do you have? The new Eagle Touring or the old Eagle RS A-2s? Sure would be nice to know if the new ones have a tread life warranty for $285/tire.
     
  3. electric_feel

    electric_feel The Electric Baron

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    My 2013 S has the Eagle RS-A2s. I bought my 2013 S used just a couple of months ago. Considering I got the car with 35k miles on it, it makes me wonder whether these are the original tires.
     
  4. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    Interesting. Average from my limited research of owners and SvCs has been 30,000-35,000 miles with outliers on either end.

    Speculation: If you've got more than 3/32" left, they're probably a replacement set.
     
  5. FlatSix911

    FlatSix911 918 Hybrid

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    Tesla — Tire Repair Kit

    "Keeps proper tire pressure maintained with the Tire Repair Kit as well, although independent of the tire sealant."
     
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  6. Don85D

    Don85D Member

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    From my experience a 12V compressor is to be carried in the car and only used in an emergency. Get a small home compressor with tank and maintaining air pressure will become simpler. You will also not add cycles and load to the 12V battery in the Tesla which controls access to the car.

    The topic of tire repair while on a road trip is unique as there are many levels of self help. I carry a jack, lug wrench and spare tire for quick replacement especially if we have a schedule and destination to make. For daily driving around town a nail puncture can be sealed with a can of sealant which also inflates the tire. This will get you home.

    Our motorcycle came with a plug kit and CO2 cylinders for inflation but I also carry sheet metal screws which when used to replace a nail in the tire will hold air for months.

    Contingency plans are just that... plans that make you feel good but are never needed. If you run tires with good deep tread, flats are very very rare.
     
  7. msnow

    msnow Active Member

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    I have this too and keep it in the frunk for emergencies but I also use it to keep my tires at the proper pressure.
     
  8. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Member

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    I have a tyre pressure gauge like this:

    [​IMG]
    just push the "scale end" in, push the other end onto the tyre's valve, the scale-end pops out (and stays put), take it off the valve and read the scale. In the event that the tyre needs air I use a 12V compressor (I bought the Tesla one, but we have one in every car, of varying brands - I don't think we have bought a car that came with a spare wheel in over a decade), so only need "power" if the tyre needs air; can't speak for the Tesla as yet, but for our other cars its a reasonably rare event.
     
  9. chillaban

    chillaban Member

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    The Tesla 12V plug appears pretty conservatively fused so when I was shopping, I found all the respectable units require a 30A plug. Would rather not find out in an emergency that it blows the fuse.

    Ended up buying the Tesla inflator + slime kit, which was surprisingly not that much more expensive than a comparable non-Tesla kit.
     
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  10. Frankman60

    Frankman60 Member

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    Does anyone have a recommendation on the brand/type of pressurized tire sealant that will NOT adversely affect the TPMS sensors in the wheels? Many products claim to be safe but I have read posts were people say that they gunked up the sensors.
     
  11. Don85D

    Don85D Member

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    If you are worried about sealant damaging TPMS sensors get the Tesla kit so that blame can be shared if there is a problem. I carry any and all brands of sealant in pressurized cans in all of our vehicles. It's the simplest way for my wife to get going again and I'll worry about the TPMS sensor later. I'll bet that the sensor can be cleaned if it becomes plugged but that's extra labour cost unless you do it yourself. Once the car is home, installing a single winter tire/wheel will give you time to deal with the punctured tire. That's my thinking.

    If my car has a flat tire while on route, I need it fixed immediately and usually that means a can of pressurized sealant or the Tesla sealant kit.

    In many decades of driving I have only had to use a sealant can once when we were picking up guests at the airport. The sealant worked until we got home and I plugged the tire for use the next day when our guests wanted to see the sights. The simple plugs fixed 2 nail holes and lasted the life of the tire.

    Like religion there will be many widely held beliefs on how to repair a tire but in my case simple DIY worked.
     
  12. electric_feel

    electric_feel The Electric Baron

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    According to this thread, the $50 Tesla tire repair kit is a re-branded version of the Fix-A-Flat Ultimate 1-Step, which looks the same as the Slime 70005 kit. I will probably just end up getting the Fix-A-Flat kit, and hopefully never have to worry about using the sealant.

    Anyone else have recommendations on PSI levels for Goodyear Eagle RS-A2s (max rated 51 PSI)? I just wanted to see how close some of you get to the max PSI.
     
  13. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Member

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    I read this in the link to "Tesla - Tire Repair Kit"

    "Please be advised that the product works as a temporary fix. The tire repair kit is not recommended as a permanent repair solution. The damaged tire should be replaced along with a new TPMS sensor at the earliest convenience. (Replacement tire and TPMS sensor not cover under warranty)."

    which reads to me like the TPMS is toast if you use the sealant - or did I read it wrongly?

    Is a new TPMS expensive?
     
  14. wdolson

    wdolson Active Member

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    It looks like prices for TPMS sensors vary a lot. A quick check shows prices ranging from $11.98 for a TPMS Service Kit on Amazon to $171 for a set of 4 on Ebay which claim to be good for a 2013-2016 Model S, though other information says Tesla changed the sensors in late 2014.
     
  15. jerry33

    jerry33 S85 - VIN:P05130 - 3/2/13

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    A service kit just replaces the rubber parts. It doesn't touch the sending parts. The rubber parts need to be replaced every time tires are replaced because the rubber hardens with age and can leak if used for more than one tire life.
     
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  16. TaoJones

    TaoJones Beyond Driven

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    Aha - thanks for posting this - so *that's* what America's/Discount Tire will charge me $28 for when I get the new set of tires at the end of this month. Seems like overkill for 18 months, but for $28 (TPMS rebuild kit for $7 x 4), better safer than sorrier.

    I saw all of the TPMS parts and pieces when I had my rims powdercoated. Lots of tiny parts and pieces indeed.
     
  17. tliving

    tliving Member

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    I got the Tesla tire inflator. The reason I bought the tesla one vs some 3rdparty is they claim it wont mess up the tire pressure sensors if you need the quick patch junk and if I needed it I didnt want to fight on coverage on those. Fortunately never needed the junk. I use the inflator all the time to keep my tires at the right pressure and a cheap digital pressure gage from Amazon. Happy with both.
     
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