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Wait time for parts

Discussion in 'Model S: Ordering, Production, Delivery' started by RamgeRover, Aug 5, 2016.

  1. RamgeRover

    RamgeRover Member

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    Location:
    Palm Springs, CA USA
    Hello everyone

    I purchased a Model S 60D last week and when I tried to order a wall connector to charge it from the online store, I discovered that there would be an estimated wait of three months to get one. Since my car will be delivered much sooner than that, it does create a dilemma. I would rather not hire an electrician to install a NEMA outlet, because that gives you a slower charge rate, and a regular 110 outlet is much, much slower still.

    Frankly, I was surprised that Tesla would deliver cars without making sure they had enough of their preferred home charging hardware in stock. But, beyond that, it also made me wonder if this kind of problem is widespread. For example, what is the experience of Tesla owners who may need a part to repair a defect in their car? Is it often the case that one has to wait weeks or months because of this kind of shortage?

    I am concerned because the Tesla will be my only car.

    Any thoughts from experienced Tesla owners would be appreciated.

    Thank you!
     
  2. Tucker48

    Tucker48 Member

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    Location:
    Ohio
    So I had this same dilemma with a three week wait time. In the end I ordered the wall charger, and determined that I would fill up at the nearest supercharger (12 miles away) like a gas station in the interim, and 'trickle charge' off of my garage wall outlet or use the dryer outlet (convenient to my garage) to charge in the meantime. The local service center also had HPWC even though the site did not but they were the old style so I waited. You might try calling a few SCs.

    My HPWC came in about a week early, and then I was waiting on the electrician. I had the car two days prior to the full install of the HPWC which was fine. I never needed to go to the Supercharger after all.

    When I ordered my CPO car, they indicated that reconditioning was going to take 3 weeks because of an ordered part. Now, I got the metallic green, so that could be a factor, but I do suspect that parts take a bit.

    All that said, I personally am not highly concerned. I once had to wait two months for a body shop to locate a proper bumper for my Saab and that was before the bankruptcy. If it is a critical part, I will likely expect Tesla to provide a loaner or some other similar solution, and perhaps I will be disappointed, but honestly, there is no shortage of cars in this country and really no shortage of transportation methods.

    As more and more people buy the vehicles, their supply chains will likely grow more robust. Maybe I'm wrong, but that's my thinking. I know people that survive with one car-or no cars-for a time. It's a risk I'm willing to take, and a problem I'm willing to solve if it occurs. Most parts are non-critical. Those that are critical, I'm hoping for a loaner or worst case a rental. Or I carpool with someone as needed.

    Tesla 95% of the time is better to me than a boring ICE 100% :)
     
    • Like x 1
  3. bonaire

    bonaire Active Member

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    Pull a large enough circuit for the HPWC. Have the electrican install a NEMA socket on the end of it. Use the plug until the HPWC comes in, swap what is on the end (install HPWC, remove socket). Or install a small sub-panel and use it for both. Two electrician visits and permits is more expensive than one and done.

    And make sure you get the proper county or township permit for these installs. I suspect a lot of people have done it sans permit.
     
  4. RamgeRover

    RamgeRover Member

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    Thanks, tucker48 and bonaire.

    I think I'll do the NEMA installation, which I can do right under the panel in the garage, and then do the wall connector later (it will require running some wires). That way I'll have two connections, which can serve as backups for each other.

    The NEMA install will add about $500 to the overall cost, but you do get a 30% credit on your total charging installation costs from the IRS, up to $1K.

    I have an electrician lined up to do the work, and I definitely will pull permits for both jobs. I know some skip the permit part, but that's a mistake -- not only for safety, but also because many homeowner's insurance policies won't cover any fire-related losses if you have installed a circuit without a permit, even if the fire was not related to the install.
     
  5. dabbler

    dabbler Member

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    Remember the NEMA 14-50 will charge at about 30 miles / hr. and the HPWC at 30 with a single car charger. Unless you have the "DUAL" car chargers installed you won't see the 58 miles / hr.charge rate.

    I used the NEMA 14-50 for a few months and for most people this would be sufficient if you drive an average of 50-75 miles per day. I drive about 110 miles per day for work and frequently need to run a few additional errands in the evening. Charging for an hour or two when I return home allows me to travel without any range anxiety.
     
  6. bonaire

    bonaire Active Member

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    I don't think a NEMA sock "really" qualifies for charging equipment ITC. A hardwired HPWC would, or L2 setup. 30 miles per hour is fantastic for overnight charging. It only lacks when you arrive home at say noon with low miles and want a 200 mile charge by 5pm.
     
  7. RamgeRover

    RamgeRover Member

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    I believe the new HPWC is configurable to deliver 48 amps with a 60 amp circuit breaker installed, with the upgraded standard car charger (at least that's the story on my 2016 refreshed Model S 60D with new front end).

    The really good news is that after I contacted Telsa with my worries about the car arriving before the HPWC, they Fedexed my HPWC in a few days and its all installed and ready to go. My first experience with the excellent customer service Tesla is known for!
     

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