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What happens when you run out of energy ?

Discussion in 'Model S' started by Swissmoneychf, Sep 7, 2016.

  1. Swissmoneychf

    Swissmoneychf Member

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    Hey,

    I was wondering, what happens when you reach 0% ? Can you still move (push?) the car as an ICE if you're stuck in middle of traffic ? Do someone from Tesla come to charge it a little bit, or they have to put it on a tow truck and take it to the service center ?

    If they do so, how much do it cost ?

    If you already experienced something like that please tell us what happened and how.
     
  2. MP3Mike

    MP3Mike Active Member

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    You would need to put the car in tow mode so that you can get out and not have the parking/emergency brake apply. Then you can push it.

    Tesla doesn't have portable charging equipment, but AAA does in some areas. So barring having AAA in a supported area you would have to get a tow truck.

    I have heard that Tesla will give you one courtesy tow when running out of juice, but after you the cost of the tow is all on you.
     
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  3. NoMoGasNeMo

    NoMoGasNeMo Member

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    Captured this a while back. Guy ran out of juice right outside of super charger in Rancho Cucamonga. image.jpeg They pushed it to the stall.
     
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  4. supratachophobia

    supratachophobia Active Member

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    Here are a couple options:

    1. Call a tow truck, have them pick up just the front wheels. Place the car in drive and then have the truck drive you a couple of miles. This will charge the battery using the regenerative braking.

    2. Place car in neutral. Push your Telsa to the top of a steep hill. Place car in drive and roll down hill. This will charge battery. Bonus points if terrain is not asphalt, make sure to take video.

    3. Buy a long metal pole. Open charge port. Wait for thunderstorm with lightning. Hold pole straight up in the air with the bottom resting in the charge port opening.
     
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  5. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    You forgot to emphasize that you must do this barefoot for optimum results. ;)

    To the OP: @supratachophobia is joking with his three "options". @MP3Mike comments were serious.

    If you spend a tiny amount of time planning your trip, use the navigation and energy graph display on the center screen, always plan to maintain at least a 10% reserve, and understand that the navigation does not factor in headwinds or rainy weather or very low temperatures, you should never run out of energy.
     
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  6. ChadS

    ChadS Petroleum is for sissies

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    After 7 years and over 150k of electric miles, I've never run out energy. That's plan A.

    If it ever looks like I am going to run out, I imagine I will be very close to my destination (otherwise, why would the battery be so low?). I would try to find a 120V outlet somewhere and plug in for an hour - that should be enough to get where I planned to go.

    Tesla does not have a written policy on this (they don't seem to have a written policy on anything) but anecdotally if you run out and call Tesla's Roadside Assistance, they will give you a free tow to a charger - at least the first time. If you do it again, you will probably have to pay for the tow.

    Depending on where you live, some AAA locations have trucks with CHAdeMO chargers on them. You will need a CHAdeMO adapter for that.
     
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  7. roblab

    roblab Active Member

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    The obvious question is, why would one run out of energy? You have fairly accurate gauges, you have a trip meter that predicts fairly well your state of charge at arrival, and it even tells you to slow down if your driving will get you to the next charger with no charge. It has been stated on multiple threads in this forum that the easiest way to get extra charge is to slow down. Yet, I know of a person who figured that if he did 100 mph, he would get there sooner, or something, and his family had to push his car to the chargers. Though it may be contrary to some people's thought, slowing down a few miles per hour will coup a lot of extra range. No one recommends planning to arrive at a charge site with zero range.

    If I see that I might be cutting it close, I have places like Plugshare that tell me of the many Level II chargers. Tesla 80 amp chargers show up on the center screen. RV parks have 14-50 220 volt charging. 110 volt is everywhere. I would know that my charge might not be enough at least halfway through my drive and could take one of many ways to get more range and not run out.

    Anyone running out of charge would just about have to plan to do so. And even then, there are a few extra miles below zero for those times when you want to push the envelope. Intelligent people just don't "run out of range".
     
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  8. kirkbauer

    kirkbauer Member

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    I think it is an interesting question, however I agree it is easy to not run out. If you are going to be anywhere even close to tight on energy, be sure to use your navigation and look at your estimated arrival SOC. If it is too low then slow down early. I target to never arrive anywhere with less than 10% SOC.
     
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  9. Maximus8

    Maximus8 Member

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    Also, be prepared to go back in time about 30 years or so.
     
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  10. RogerHScott

    RogerHScott Active Member

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    While I agree that "never go below 10%" is good general advice, I think the slightly more nuanced answer is "never go below 10% in
    unfamiliar circumstances". For example, if you are well aware of the driving conditions, distances, etc., between where you are and
    your home (and, thus, home charger) it is probably a lot more reasonable to go under 10% on your way home than it would be out
    "in the wild". Also be aware that an area Tesla could improve in local navigation to the SpCs themselves; you might think you're "there"
    but still have some driving to do to find the actual SpC -- you don't want to wind up being the unfortunate person in the photo above.
     
  11. Skotty

    Skotty 2014 Model S P85

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    I've seen a lot of people concerned about this, when I talk to them about the Model S. I'm curous...do people routinely run their ICE cars out of gas? I never have. Yeah, there is not a supercharger station on every corner right now, but still, it should be a very rare thing. I guess it's just the thought that if it did happen, it's easier to fix with a gas car.
     
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  12. Lawsteve

    Lawsteve MCATDT

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    This has typically been one of the first questions asked about my car (second only to "How far can you go on a charge?") I always ask them "How many times have you run out of gas?" Usually the answer is "Never". I then ask them why not, and they always say they fill up with gas before the car gets on empty. I simply reply - me too, but with electricity.
     
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  13. mediocreguy

    mediocreguy Member

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    I think you either get a tow or you push - even Bjorn did it...
     
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  14. Maximus8

    Maximus8 Member

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    For those who don't plan or those who's plans get messed up, this is a real issue. For me, I normally set my charge limit to 50%. Last weekend, I had to make an emergency 120 mile (one way) trip. I was able to make the trip to my destination but for my return trip, I had to extend my route so I can reach the closest SCh. Normally for that same trip, I would have bumped my charge limit to 90% the night before and I would not have taken the extended route to reach the SCh. It's all about planning at this point.
     
  15. aesculus

    aesculus Still Trying to Figure this All Out

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    Tell me about it. I wandered around Vacaville once early on going by the SCs over and over again trying to find what was right in front of me. Not one of my finest moments in life.:(
     
  16. ecarfan

    ecarfan Well-Known Member

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    Agreed. My spouse is more comfortable when the energy graph shows we will arrive at our destination with at least 20%. I am okay with 10%. On a route where you know very accurately how much you are going to use than a lower value seems fine to me.
    This of course is a separate discussion, but now that the OPs question has been satisfactorily answered (at least to me it has) I want to comment that many people feel there is no reason -- based on available data -- to routinely keep the battery at something like a 50% charge. It does not appear to prolong battery life or reduce degradation compared to keeping it at around 80%. It does not seem advisable to keep the battery at over 90%

    If someone wants to keep their battery routinely at 50% that's fine, their choice. But I see no reason to do so. I bring this up in case the OP, who I am guessing is a new owner, might think that keeping the Tesla battery at a low charge level routinely is recommended or advisable.
     
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  17. RogerHScott

    RogerHScott Active Member

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    It gives me a warm, fuzzy feeling inside knowing that my 90D starts the day with a 90% charge. :)
    That feeling would be cooler and less fuzzy at 50%, for sure. ;)
     
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  18. supratachophobia

    supratachophobia Active Member

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    Sooo bad for the battery....
     
  19. MissAutobahn

    MissAutobahn Elon, please ramp up Fremont in ludicrous mode!

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  20. Maximus8

    Maximus8 Member

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    Good to know...I'm a relatively new owner (less than 7 months)
     

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