Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

What I Learned About My Model 3 on a 3,409 Mile Road Trip

jsrawa

Active Member
Apr 11, 2016
1,088
811
Colorado
As for hail storms, I live in New Mexico and we get 'em as well. Always makes me nervous for my car.

I wish there were "hail bags" -- air bags embedded in various front, side, top, and back exterior compartments that, when you press a big red button and the car is in Park, all pop open and surround the car in six inches of an instantly-inflated protective bubble, to prevent any hail damage to the car. Of course, pressing a small "retract" button would cause all the airbags to deflate and quietly return to their designated compartments for the next hail onslaught.

I have thought of a similar idea but alas nothing like this exists yet. The OP is correct that in Colorado hail happens quite frequently and without a ton of notice. I don't have a garage at our current house that I will be able to park in and it gives me anxiety even thinking about my to be delivered 3 out there in a hail storm. I also wish they made a small pop up tent type thing you could fit into a trunk or frunk just strong enough to repel hail.

EDIT: Well what do you know, something does exist but the reviews make it look just OK.

Lanmodo Pro 4-Season Automatic Car Tent Cover Carport Folded,Car Umbrella Tent Car... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07DDCSP72/ref=cm_sw_r_sms_c_api_i_WSkyBbA2BD1B4
 

TaoJones

Beyond Driven
Nov 10, 2014
3,064
2,857
The Americas
Hail protection for your chariot - ensure ordering the correct length. $309 net, it looks like with the $150 off.

Then again, carrying ~3 $10 sleeping bags and some heavy things to hold them in place sounds like a reasonable and much more properly Scottish solution as well. Aside from the hassle of drying them out afterward.

Great report from the OP. The speed limit failures are one of the glaring weaknesses of AP2, whereas AP1 simply had sign recognition *and reaction* via the camera. People who don’t drive a lot don’t appreciate what an annoyance and risk a limit 10mph over or under presents when using AS via AP2. Just awful. Ideally, a hybrid solution combining the approaches of AP1 and AP2 will work nicely. Phantom braking ranks a close second. Only takes once and that’s it for domestic harmony for the next 100 miles.
 

Irish

New Member
Jul 1, 2018
3
0
Fairfax, VA
Road trip from Riverside, CA to Mount Rushmore, SD and Back in a Model 3

First a few basic facts:

1. Round trip Mileage: 3,409
2. Average WH/mile: 249
3. Firmware VER: 2018.24.1
4. Route with Stops:
a. Riverside, CA to St. George, UT
b. To Grand Junction, CO
c. To Vail, CO
d. To Hartsel, CO
e. To Parker, CO
f. To Douglas, WY
g. To Keystone, SD
h. To Rapid City, SD
i. To Laramie, WY
j. To Steamboat Springs, CO
k. To Grand Junction, CO
l. To: Riverside, CA

There were many side trips in the Keystone and Rapid City areas to Custer National Park, Wind Cave National Park, Hill City, Rushmore Monument, Bear Land USA, Sturgis, SD, and Spearfish Canyon, SD.

The 3 performed flawlessly without any problems occurring, most importantly problems that would have required service or a tow. This speaks well of the fundamental design. It was at times a bit scary when we were in areas with no cell phone coverage on either AT&T for the car or Verizon for our iPhone Xs and miles from any where with no other vehicles to be seen; more on this a little later.

The only real traffic jam we encountered was on the return leg from about 10 miles east of Prim to about a mile west of Prim caused by a semi catching fire that burned it to the ground (It wasn’t a Tesla so that is probably the reason you didn’t see it on the national news). That was a long hour plus in 115 degree weather crawling along. EAP was a big help.

I used TeslaFi to track my progress. I was a bit disappointed in “AbetterRoutePlanner.com” in that when I needed it, it quit routing and started very strange behavior. Before I left it was working fine but the first time I needed it, it wouldn’t work and has not worked since on either my laptop or my home computer. It always says it can’t find a route. I found the on board route planner very accurate in estimating usage and arrival charge. Routing is another issue.

I have no doubt it always picked the shortest route; however, many times we were routed on gravel roads or county roads that were barely, if ever, maintained and we were often in the middle of nowhere on two lane roads with no other traffic, no farms, no cell coverage and this sometimes lasted for over 50 miles. Needless to say, a breakdown would have been catastrophic. Thank goodness the 3 never faltered. A feature needs to be added to the navigation to not use secondary roads and or to provide a warning that the only path to the destination requires the use of secondary roads. An extra nice feature would be the ability to have it text the information to a trusted party saying starting route on county road XXX, possibly no cell coverage for YY miles if no response in x hours please call Tesla Service for help. In some cases temperatures were over 100 degrees and being stranded in a vehicle that failed with no AC could be dangerous. On a positive note, we saw areas of the country we would never have seen from the Interstates or state highways.

I had a clear bra installed about a month prior to our trip and I then ceramic coated the entire car my self. It was amazing that I was able to keep the car looking nice the entire trip with a spray bottle with ONR and about 6 micro fiber cloths. One time I did have to use a self-cleaning spray wash but the other times I was able to do it without having to find a self serve car wash. The biggest issue was bugs, lots and lots of bugs on the front nose but they cleaned off pretty easily. I used Gyeon Cure on all of the glass and it worked fantastically in the rain and for cleaning off the bugs with the ONR/water spray. It works better than RainX with no wiper chatter and my glass always looked great. It is also a lot easier to apply.

Auto Pilot was a hit and miss proposition. I can’t say it was never helpful but there were issues. On relatively long straight stretches it worked pretty well but the nagging feature is a pain. Having to consciously keep a resistance to what the wheel wants to do it sometimes more tiring than just driving it yourself. In states where the exit ramps and on ramps have a dashed line across the openings there was never an issue of it trying to exit the highway when it shouldn’t but where they were absent it was unpredictable and required taking control on a couple of occasions. Surprisingly, I thought AP did better on some nice two-lane roads where it slowed down for curves and seemed to stay in the right place 98% of the time provided the curves were not too sharp. On twisty mountain roads, I never felt comfortable using AP as there were too many hairpin turns and lanes turning into a single lane through tunnels and other anomalies. Even at 20mph I wasn’t brave enough to trust it. Maybe it would have worked but it freaked my wife out often enough that I didn’t want to test her patience with the system. Twice we got the collision warning. Once we were approaching a blind hairpin curve and a large bus came around the curve and appeared to be heading toward us. It sounded the collision alarm and slammed on the brakes. Scared the hell out of my wife. The second time, we were on a narrow country road with a group of bicyclists and I was going past them as one veered a little to close to us again sounding the collision alarm and slamming on the brakes while steering us a little away from him. Fortunately, no phantom braking events the entire trip. On the interstates, it seldom slows down for curves, even when the sign shows a change in speed limit (not just a suggested safe speed). I found the speed limit displayed was wrong about 50% of the time. A Google map just hasn’t updated the maps in these areas. One time I was on a state gravel road that ended at a friends ranch but Google maps showed the road continuing for miles past the ranch. It doesn’t and the owner told me he has sent multiple emails to Google to try and get it changed to no avail. Even though there is a gate and fencing with no trespassing signs he has had people put their bikes over the fence and try and argue that it is a public state road. It isn’t.

The bottom line on AP is that it needs to:

1. Be more predictable and consistent in its behavior, this is key to inspiring confidence in the system
2. In the 3 use the interior camera or a different sensor to determine hands on the wheel/attention to the road
3. Slow down for curves the way a human driver does or if the speed limit changes
4. Start the turn in sooner and more gradually in turns instead of waiting until the last possible moment to turn
5. Reduce nag frequency-it can be very tiring to constantly get this warning even though your hands are on the wheel. Adding a touch sensor strip all the way around the wheel might help solve this problem
6. In both cases where I got collision warnings I was on TACC, not EAP, and I was aware of the situation and in control but the collision warning startles you and could cause you to react in a detrimental way. I realize false warnings are bound to occur; however, sounding the alarm should be the first action. Steering avoidance should be the second action if the driver takes no action followed by full application of the brakes as the third action. Not slamming and releasing the brakes as it currently does. If you are about to collide you want to stop the car if possible while steering away from the collision source. I don’t get the logic behind slam and release.

At the present time, I cannot reliably predict if the system will open or close my garage door, try and exit on an off ramp or where it will steer if the lane suddenly widens or merges into another lane, when it will apply the brakes on its own (phantom braking), what behavior to expect on an imminent collision and what triggers it to think so, when it will nag me even though I have both hands on the wheel, and if I can trust it to stop for a stationary obstacle in my path that wasn’t previously moving. This isn’t to say that it doesn’t help on occasion, especially in stop & go traffic but it needs to do more. Mine never seems to see a parking space unless there clearly isn’t one in which case it sees one being there. The cameras are barely used. I was doing a lane change and didn’t see a car rapidly approaching in my blind area and the car started doing the lane change before I turned it sharply away to avoid a collision (no collision warning sounded).

Trip Charging Costs: The round trip charging cost was $123.62 or $0.0363 per mile.


Comfort for Road Trips:

The Model 3 is a very comfortable car for travel. The seats are exceptionally comfortable and neither my wife nor I ever felt discomfort from the seats or the interior. We drove in temperatures from 117 degrees down to about 70 degrees. I have not added any tinting to the windows or roof. There were a few times in the over 100 degree temperatures with the sun coming from in front where we had to turn up the fan speed to 7 or 8 with the temp set to 70 but it usually cooled us down enough so we were fine after a few minutes. The storage was more than adequate. We traveled for 13 days with a carry on suitcase for each of us; a backpack and a backpack sized soft case and a small shoe bag. They all fit comfortably in the trunk with the seats up. In the Frunk I placed cleaning supplies, a small cooler with snacks and emergency tools. In the sub trunk in the rear, I had my camera gear, portable air compressor, the Tesla charger, an emergency blanket and a few other miscellaneous items. I have an organizer for trunk and frunk.

We reclined the seats for naps while charging or we went and ate.

We mostly followed the speed limit or occasionally 5-10mph over the limit and an occasional 100mph when passing on two lane roads. It gets there very fast.

The suspension can be a bit harsh on some road surfaces, especially washboard gravel roads that can shake your teeth out. Overall, it is not horrible or unbearable.

In strong crosswinds, the car is occasionally moved and the wind noise gets substantially louder.


The Unexpected:

One situation that I never thought about and that anyone undertaking such a trip needs to think about is the frequently violent hail storms that can suddenly occur in this part of the country. These aren’t tiny pebble size hail but very large and heavy hail that can destroy windshields, glass roofs and hoods. I was lucky in that the first one I encountered was while we were staying at a B&B and the owner allowed my to park my car in his carport when the possibility of a large storm came up. We did get hail but fortunately it was not large enough to do damage and my car was safely under their carport. After that close encounter, I tended to park my car close to the entry to motels/hotels (that did not have protected parking) and to obtain permission to park my car under their portico should a storm come up. You can see the dents in the hoods and roofs of many cars in the area. South Dakota, Wyoming and parts of Colorado apparently have these storms frequently in the summer time. I still wonder what I would do if caught out in one. Various locals suggested looking for a car wash or gas station to park under and wait out the storm. Maybe some of you from these areas have a better solution.


Conclusion:

Visiting Mount Rushmore and the National parks we were able to see in the time we had is a very worthwhile adventure. It is inspiring and humbling to see what men were able to accomplish by dedicating their life to a vision. Now take your Tesla and go have a fun adventure, there is nothing like it.
Road trip from Riverside, CA to Mount Rushmore, SD and Back in a Model 3

First a few basic facts:

1. Round trip Mileage: 3,409
2. Average WH/mile: 249
3. Firmware VER: 2018.24.1
4. Route with Stops:
a. Riverside, CA to St. George, UT
b. To Grand Junction, CO
c. To Vail, CO
d. To Hartsel, CO
e. To Parker, CO
f. To Douglas, WY
g. To Keystone, SD
h. To Rapid City, SD
i. To Laramie, WY
j. To Steamboat Springs, CO
k. To Grand Junction, CO
l. To: Riverside, CA

There were many side trips in the Keystone and Rapid City areas to Custer National Park, Wind Cave National Park, Hill City, Rushmore Monument, Bear Land USA, Sturgis, SD, and Spearfish Canyon, SD.

The 3 performed flawlessly without any problems occurring, most importantly problems that would have required service or a tow. This speaks well of the fundamental design. It was at times a bit scary when we were in areas with no cell phone coverage on either AT&T for the car or Verizon for our iPhone Xs and miles from any where with no other vehicles to be seen; more on this a little later.

The only real traffic jam we encountered was on the return leg from about 10 miles east of Prim to about a mile west of Prim caused by a semi catching fire that burned it to the ground (It wasn’t a Tesla so that is probably the reason you didn’t see it on the national news). That was a long hour plus in 115 degree weather crawling along. EAP was a big help.

I used TeslaFi to track my progress. I was a bit disappointed in “AbetterRoutePlanner.com” in that when I needed it, it quit routing and started very strange behavior. Before I left it was working fine but the first time I needed it, it wouldn’t work and has not worked since on either my laptop or my home computer. It always says it can’t find a route. I found the on board route planner very accurate in estimating usage and arrival charge. Routing is another issue.

I have no doubt it always picked the shortest route; however, many times we were routed on gravel roads or county roads that were barely, if ever, maintained and we were often in the middle of nowhere on two lane roads with no other traffic, no farms, no cell coverage and this sometimes lasted for over 50 miles. Needless to say, a breakdown would have been catastrophic. Thank goodness the 3 never faltered. A feature needs to be added to the navigation to not use secondary roads and or to provide a warning that the only path to the destination requires the use of secondary roads. An extra nice feature would be the ability to have it text the information to a trusted party saying starting route on county road XXX, possibly no cell coverage for YY miles if no response in x hours please call Tesla Service for help. In some cases temperatures were over 100 degrees and being stranded in a vehicle that failed with no AC could be dangerous. On a positive note, we saw areas of the country we would never have seen from the Interstates or state highways.

I had a clear bra installed about a month prior to our trip and I then ceramic coated the entire car my self. It was amazing that I was able to keep the car looking nice the entire trip with a spray bottle with ONR and about 6 micro fiber cloths. One time I did have to use a self-cleaning spray wash but the other times I was able to do it without having to find a self serve car wash. The biggest issue was bugs, lots and lots of bugs on the front nose but they cleaned off pretty easily. I used Gyeon Cure on all of the glass and it worked fantastically in the rain and for cleaning off the bugs with the ONR/water spray. It works better than RainX with no wiper chatter and my glass always looked great. It is also a lot easier to apply.

Auto Pilot was a hit and miss proposition. I can’t say it was never helpful but there were issues. On relatively long straight stretches it worked pretty well but the nagging feature is a pain. Having to consciously keep a resistance to what the wheel wants to do it sometimes more tiring than just driving it yourself. In states where the exit ramps and on ramps have a dashed line across the openings there was never an issue of it trying to exit the highway when it shouldn’t but where they were absent it was unpredictable and required taking control on a couple of occasions. Surprisingly, I thought AP did better on some nice two-lane roads where it slowed down for curves and seemed to stay in the right place 98% of the time provided the curves were not too sharp. On twisty mountain roads, I never felt comfortable using AP as there were too many hairpin turns and lanes turning into a single lane through tunnels and other anomalies. Even at 20mph I wasn’t brave enough to trust it. Maybe it would have worked but it freaked my wife out often enough that I didn’t want to test her patience with the system. Twice we got the collision warning. Once we were approaching a blind hairpin curve and a large bus came around the curve and appeared to be heading toward us. It sounded the collision alarm and slammed on the brakes. Scared the hell out of my wife. The second time, we were on a narrow country road with a group of bicyclists and I was going past them as one veered a little to close to us again sounding the collision alarm and slamming on the brakes while steering us a little away from him. Fortunately, no phantom braking events the entire trip. On the interstates, it seldom slows down for curves, even when the sign shows a change in speed limit (not just a suggested safe speed). I found the speed limit displayed was wrong about 50% of the time. A Google map just hasn’t updated the maps in these areas. One time I was on a state gravel road that ended at a friends ranch but Google maps showed the road continuing for miles past the ranch. It doesn’t and the owner told me he has sent multiple emails to Google to try and get it changed to no avail. Even though there is a gate and fencing with no trespassing signs he has had people put their bikes over the fence and try and argue that it is a public state road. It isn’t.

The bottom line on AP is that it needs to:

1. Be more predictable and consistent in its behavior, this is key to inspiring confidence in the system
2. In the 3 use the interior camera or a different sensor to determine hands on the wheel/attention to the road
3. Slow down for curves the way a human driver does or if the speed limit changes
4. Start the turn in sooner and more gradually in turns instead of waiting until the last possible moment to turn
5. Reduce nag frequency-it can be very tiring to constantly get this warning even though your hands are on the wheel. Adding a touch sensor strip all the way around the wheel might help solve this problem
6. In both cases where I got collision warnings I was on TACC, not EAP, and I was aware of the situation and in control but the collision warning startles you and could cause you to react in a detrimental way. I realize false warnings are bound to occur; however, sounding the alarm should be the first action. Steering avoidance should be the second action if the driver takes no action followed by full application of the brakes as the third action. Not slamming and releasing the brakes as it currently does. If you are about to collide you want to stop the car if possible while steering away from the collision source. I don’t get the logic behind slam and release.

At the present time, I cannot reliably predict if the system will open or close my garage door, try and exit on an off ramp or where it will steer if the lane suddenly widens or merges into another lane, when it will apply the brakes on its own (phantom braking), what behavior to expect on an imminent collision and what triggers it to think so, when it will nag me even though I have both hands on the wheel, and if I can trust it to stop for a stationary obstacle in my path that wasn’t previously moving. This isn’t to say that it doesn’t help on occasion, especially in stop & go traffic but it needs to do more. Mine never seems to see a parking space unless there clearly isn’t one in which case it sees one being there. The cameras are barely used. I was doing a lane change and didn’t see a car rapidly approaching in my blind area and the car started doing the lane change before I turned it sharply away to avoid a collision (no collision warning sounded).

Trip Charging Costs: The round trip charging cost was $123.62 or $0.0363 per mile.


Comfort for Road Trips:

The Model 3 is a very comfortable car for travel. The seats are exceptionally comfortable and neither my wife nor I ever felt discomfort from the seats or the interior. We drove in temperatures from 117 degrees down to about 70 degrees. I have not added any tinting to the windows or roof. There were a few times in the over 100 degree temperatures with the sun coming from in front where we had to turn up the fan speed to 7 or 8 with the temp set to 70 but it usually cooled us down enough so we were fine after a few minutes. The storage was more than adequate. We traveled for 13 days with a carry on suitcase for each of us; a backpack and a backpack sized soft case and a small shoe bag. They all fit comfortably in the trunk with the seats up. In the Frunk I placed cleaning supplies, a small cooler with snacks and emergency tools. In the sub trunk in the rear, I had my camera gear, portable air compressor, the Tesla charger, an emergency blanket and a few other miscellaneous items. I have an organizer for trunk and frunk.

We reclined the seats for naps while charging or we went and ate.

We mostly followed the speed limit or occasionally 5-10mph over the limit and an occasional 100mph when passing on two lane roads. It gets there very fast.

The suspension can be a bit harsh on some road surfaces, especially washboard gravel roads that can shake your teeth out. Overall, it is not horrible or unbearable.

In strong crosswinds, the car is occasionally moved and the wind noise gets substantially louder.


The Unexpected:

One situation that I never thought about and that anyone undertaking such a trip needs to think about is the frequently violent hail storms that can suddenly occur in this part of the country. These aren’t tiny pebble size hail but very large and heavy hail that can destroy windshields, glass roofs and hoods. I was lucky in that the first one I encountered was while we were staying at a B&B and the owner allowed my to park my car in his carport when the possibility of a large storm came up. We did get hail but fortunately it was not large enough to do damage and my car was safely under their carport. After that close encounter, I tended to park my car close to the entry to motels/hotels (that did not have protected parking) and to obtain permission to park my car under their portico should a storm come up. You can see the dents in the hoods and roofs of many cars in the area. South Dakota, Wyoming and parts of Colorado apparently have these storms frequently in the summer time. I still wonder what I would do if caught out in one. Various locals suggested looking for a car wash or gas station to park under and wait out the storm. Maybe some of you from these areas have a better solution.


Conclusion:

Visiting Mount Rushmore and the National parks we were able to see in the time we had is a very worthwhile adventure. It is inspiring and humbling to see what men were able to accomplish by dedicating their life to a vision. Now take your Tesla and go have a fun adventure, there is nothing like it.
Just visited my brother out in Oroville,CA in one of several smaller road trips (3 months and 8,700 miles) While on that trip we visited the Sly creek reservoir for boating, I did not want to force my 6'4" son to have to sit in the back seat of my brothers extended cab truck so we followed him in our model 3, along the route we had to pull over for my wife to handle a business call as cell service began to fail, we had programed the route earlier so it seemed no problem if we caught up later, we were routed off to a poorly maintained road (Lumpkin road) strewn full of wheel bending potholes and then to Golden trout crossing which turned out to be a fire road filled with softball size rocks and we traveled down that road 1 mile or more thinking it would open back up to paved road soon, we then turned around, got back on to Lumpkin and decided to go the route of going further away to Little grass valley reservoir then through La Porte and back to Sly creek, along the Way we spotted a HUGE bear crossing the road that just stopped in the middle about 200 ft from us, we stopped the car and for about 5 seconds I told my wife "LOOK AT THAT BEAR! QUICK GET A PICTURE" all she said was "A BEAR, OH MY GOD!" we missed the pic, we had no service after we pulled over 2 hours earlier and it was quit the adventure that was unnerving at best, my right arm had some deep fingernail marks as my wife was more than concerned for our safety! the "thank goodness the car never faltered" in your paragraph above was never more true for us that day and cannot agree more with you that something needs to be addressed about this!

Oh and NO it does not always pick the shortest route as it added 10 miles to our route if we completed the fire road which we would not have been able to and after we reached Little grass valley it said we had 72 miles instead of about 20 plus to go to reach our final destination as it wanted to route us in a HUGE circle and back to that impassable road!

I looked at my phone with google maps later and it showed the correct route so not sure what map service Tesla is using.

here is the google map satellite view so you can see what road we were routed on to
Google Maps
Look at Golden trout, it turns into WOODS! after a short while, not even a road! I can't imagine what would have happened to us if the car failed there!

On a side note we want to do your exact road trip in a couple of weeks if we can with a stop at Pikes Peak just to see one of the highest paved roads in the states and I had no idea of the hail possibilities so thank you for the heads up!
Barjohn
Barjohn, great update and many thanks. Taking a 4,000 mi trip in October (VA to NM RT) and this helps.
Barjohn, what did you do for tire emergencies? I didn't see it mentioned. Tesla repair kit, or the like, perhaps? Thanks!
 

jamnmon66

Member
Apr 10, 2018
572
406
Brighton, CO
I live in CO. Hail is the most frequent costly natural disaster here. My wife's car was totaled by hail last year. If you're parked in the open and you don't realize that it's coming until it starts then you're screwed. It's not safe to run out into it if the hail is big enough to damage your car. If you're driving, then the best bet is to turn around and drive away from it. Once you're a little ways away then pull over and look at the radar on your phone to see if you can get around the ugly colors on the radar map. If not, then finding some sort of cover is the only option. Underpasses can generally only fit a few cars so it's tough to find an open spot under one once you're in the storm. Same with covered gas stations, etc.

I'm wary about pulling over on the highway, especially in bad weather, because it's not as rare as you'd think to get rear-ended. Sometimes, of course, there's no other option but a rear-end crash on the highway can be tragic and not just for the car.
 

silentcorp

Member
Jul 20, 2018
514
671
Denver CO
Yeah, in CO when it hails people will just stop in the highway so they are covered by the underpass, just screwing everyone behind them. I live in fear!
 

Randy Spencer

Active Member
Mar 31, 2016
3,608
3,649
Alameda, CA
a. George, UT
b. Grand Junction, CO
h. Rapid City, SD
i. Laramie, WY
k. Grand Junction, CO
Did you list these places as stops? Aren't they Supercharger locations. If you were listing chargers you would have had to put in a LOT more.

Personally, I have zero issues with the AP as it stands, I am an early adopter, and it gets better almost every week. I know it fails around sharp bends, and in construction but really the rest of the time I am watching the sights. Sure, it's annoying to keep grabbing the wheel, I console myself thinking how great it will be when it gets FSD.
It was at times a bit scary when we were in areas with no cell phone coverage on either AT&T for the car or Verizon for our iPhone Xs

Wait, the Model 3 uses AT&T? My iPhone X uses AT&T and there were LOTS of times on MY Colorado road trip where the car had full bars and the phone none, or vice versa. That makes me think the car uses Verizon.

-Randy
 
Last edited:

barjohn

Member
Sep 23, 2017
547
668
Riverside, CA
Those were places I stopped for the night, most but not all were SC locations too but I charged at other locations as well.

I have iPhone Xs (Wife and I) and we are on Verizon. I have read that Tesla uses AT&T and that appeared to be confirmed on road trip as well as at my house. At my house I have great Verizon coverage and very low AT&T coverage and that is what my car shows. Often it can't get a signal in my garage while my phone is showing 5 bars in the same location. We saw the same thing on the trip. No coverage with car and strong coverage with Verizon and vice versa except in areas with no coverage on either.

As for the hail threat, it sounds like an opportunity to invent something that could be rapidly deployed to protect your vehicle.
 

chronopc

Active Member
Jul 8, 2017
2,873
2,722
California
In both cases where I got collision warnings I was on TACC, not EAP, and I was aware of the situation and in control but the collision warning startles you and could cause you to react in a detrimental way. I realize false warnings are bound to occur; however, sounding the alarm should be the first action. Steering avoidance should be the second action if the driver takes no action followed by full application of the brakes as the third action. Not slamming and releasing the brakes as it currently does. If you are about to collide you want to stop the car if possible while steering away from the collision source. I don’t get the logic behind slam and release.
Totally agree that the collision warning is scary. It freaks out my girlfriend every time still, but I've gotten used to it and it has saved me on a couple of occasions when the flow of traffic came to a sudden stop.
 

jamnmon66

Member
Apr 10, 2018
572
406
Brighton, CO
Wait, the Model 3 uses AT&T? My iPhone X uses AT&T and there were LOTS of times on MY Colorado road trip where the car had full bars and the phone none, or vice versa. That makes me think the car uses Verizon.
I'm pretty sure that AT&T is correct. At work, there is an AT&T tower nearby but all other carriers have weak signal. This is one of the few places where my car has good signal but my Verizon phone doesn't.
 

Randy Spencer

Active Member
Mar 31, 2016
3,608
3,649
Alameda, CA
Perhaps they use T-Mobile, if both AT&T customers and Verizon customers are not seeing the same signal on their car as on their phones

-Randy (apparently the only AT&T customer that owns a Tesla)
 

barjohn

Member
Sep 23, 2017
547
668
Riverside, CA
I think the navigation system needs an option to avoid secondary roads unless they are the only way to get to a particular destination (usually the final leg of the destination only) or to display alternate routes and let one select the route.
 

Randy Spencer

Active Member
Mar 31, 2016
3,608
3,649
Alameda, CA
Yeah, I hate having to use WAZE to find an alternate route and then pick destinations along that route to ask the Tesla to take me to. Why it cannot just offer several alternatives perplexes me.

-Randy
 

barjohn

Member
Sep 23, 2017
547
668
Riverside, CA
I think we all keep waiting for the ability to add waypoints. By the way is the web site a betterrouzteplanner.com working for anyone? I keep getting no route found and on the road it didn't show my saved routes even though I was logging in. It seems to be broken now.
 

ℬête Noire

Active Member
Jan 30, 2018
3,105
2,556
TX
Yeah, I hate having to use WAZE to find an alternate route and then pick destinations along that route to ask the Tesla to take me to. Why it cannot just offer several alternatives perplexes me.

-Randy
Their algorithms & feature set is just not as good as Waze. Not really surprising since it is singularly core to Waze’s existance.

All those extra features, and often better algorithms, require more backend punch & data. Waze (especially under Google umbrella simply have stronger basis here).

Waze also currently has a claimed 100mil users active in a given month. Even spread across 13 countries that’s a lot of data they have access to build traffic state data. As Model 3 sales really ramp # of Tesla cars on the road it’ll help some but still won’t make #s anytime soon.

The also allow active user input of that would be pretty controversial for Tesla to allow (frankly is controversial w/Waze).

Kinda wish Tesla figured out a way to get this in PIP thing on the center screen (CP/AA itself is a non-starter). That’s a pretty tall order, and would be inherently fragile to iOS/Android changes, on top of whatever Waze felt about it.
 

barjohn

Member
Sep 23, 2017
547
668
Riverside, CA
Here are two pictures I took of Mt Rushmore. One in late afternoon and the other after the lighting ceremony.
DSCF1865-1.jpg
DSCF1880-1.jpg
DSCF1865-1.jpg DSCF1880-1.jpg
 

rdlink

Member
Jul 12, 2018
509
491
Colorado
...On a side note we want to do your exact road trip in a couple of weeks if we can with a stop at Pikes Peak just to see one of the highest paved roads in the states and I had no idea of the hail possibilities so thank you for the heads up!

Pikes Peak is nice, but if you want to go on THE highest paved road in North America you should head up the Mt. Evans Scenic Byway, which is only about 50 miles or so from Denver, and closer to your ostensible route through the area. Or better yet, jump off I-70 at US-40 and head over Berthoud Pass, and up and over Trail Ridge Road through Rocky Mountain National Park. The highest paved continuous highway in North America.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: ℬête Noire

gilscales

Banned
Jul 16, 2016
1,694
1,907
Long Beach, CA
Pikes Peak is nice, but if you want to go on THE highest paved road in North America you should head up the Mt. Evans Scenic Byway, which is only about 50 miles or so from Denver, and closer to your ostensible route through the area. Or better yet, jump off I-70 at US-40 and head over Berthoud Pass, and up and over Trail Ridge Road through Rocky Mountain National Park. The highest paved continuous highway in North America.
Thanks!
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top