Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Where can I purchase Tesla Model 3 Tire Pressure Sensors

ALSET4NOW

Member
Oct 6, 2019
8
0
CA
Hello,

Where can I purchase Tesla Model 3 Tire pressure sensors for 19" sport wheels? I don't see TPMS available in the Tesla website. Any idea how much it is?

Thanks in advance.
 

mswlogo

Well-Known Member
Aug 27, 2018
6,123
4,735
MA, NH
Hello,

Where can I purchase Tesla Model 3 Tire pressure sensors for 19" sport wheels? I don't see TPMS available in the Tesla website. Any idea how much it is?

Thanks in advance.

You can buy at parts department of any service center.

TireRack 433hz around $50/ea is nearly identical.

They're made by Continental.

I’ve bought two sets from Tire rack and they worked perfectly. No programming needed.

Don’t buy universal ones as they need to be programmed.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: New_Old_Stock

1deepthink

Member
Jul 31, 2018
184
173
Salt Lake City
I have OEM tires and 19" wheels. I'm seeing 3-4 pounds of difference between the car's display and a pressure gauge. (gauge being higher tested with two different gauges). Also, I have had one summer/winter tire swap. Has anyone seen this or have a recommendation? Thank you!
 

SomeJoe7777

Marginally-Known Member
Mar 28, 2015
2,191
5,686
Houston, TX
I have OEM tires and 19" wheels. I'm seeing 3-4 pounds of difference between the car's display and a pressure gauge. (gauge being higher tested with two different gauges). Also, I have had one summer/winter tire swap. Has anyone seen this or have a recommendation? Thank you!

Your elevation in Salt Lake City is causing this. The TPMS sensors are calibrated/referenced to sea-level pressure, not differential/atmospheric pressure like a manual pressure gauge. Elevation causes approximately 1 psi higher measured gauge pressure in the tire for every 2000' of height above sea level. Example: At 6000 feet, a gauge will read 3 psi higher than TPMS. The true pressure in the tire is the gauge pressure, not the TPMS reading.

The proper method to set your tire pressure at altitude is as follows:

1. Pick a pressure to run your tires at. The placard pressure on the driver's door jam is a good start, normally 42 psi for most Model 3's. You can run the tires slightly less (40 psi) for a more comfortable ride, or slightly more (45 psi) for longer range.
2. Set the tire pressure using a manual pressure gauge. This will fill the tires properly.
3. The TPMS readings in the car will now show a lower pressure (1 psi for every 2000' of altitude). Perform the "TPMS Learn New Pressures" procedure (Controls > Service > Reset TPMS Sensors > Learn new Pressures). This will tell the car that the current TPMS readings are now your "normal" pressures. This will silence any alarms from the TPMS system unless the tires actually get low.
4. This will not affect the TPMS readings -- they will still show lower pressure than the gauge. Keep that in mind when monitoring your tire pressures.
 

SageBrush

REJECT Fascism
May 7, 2015
12,504
15,510
New Mexico
Your elevation in Salt Lake City is causing this. The TPMS sensors are calibrated/referenced to sea-level pressure, not differential/atmospheric pressure like a manual pressure gauge. Elevation causes approximately 1 psi higher measured gauge pressure in the tire for every 2000' of height above sea level. Example: At 6000 feet, a gauge will read 3 psi higher than TPMS. The true pressure in the tire is the gauge pressure, not the TPMS reading.
I apologize for being a dunce but I still do not get this.

What is the TPMS sensor measuring ?
 

PearlShark

Member
Oct 13, 2017
142
66
Canada
Just to share this with anybody else looking for TPMS sensors. Amazon has the set for $99 plus tax and shipping.

They are pre programmed to Model 3. Search for ITM Tesla Model 3 TPMS.

It was cheaper for me to order these and ship them to Canada than the $75 EACH that a local shop was charging for them. sensor.
 

1deepthink

Member
Jul 31, 2018
184
173
Salt Lake City
Your elevation in Salt Lake City is causing this. The TPMS sensors are calibrated/referenced to sea-level pressure, not differential/atmospheric pressure like a manual pressure gauge. Elevation causes approximately 1 psi higher measured gauge pressure in the tire for every 2000' of height above sea level. Example: At 6000 feet, a gauge will read 3 psi higher than TPMS. The true pressure in the tire is the gauge pressure, not the TPMS reading.

The proper method to set your tire pressure at altitude is as follows:

1. Pick a pressure to run your tires at. The placard pressure on the driver's door jam is a good start, normally 42 psi for most Model 3's. You can run the tires slightly less (40 psi) for a more comfortable ride, or slightly more (45 psi) for longer range.
2. Set the tire pressure using a manual pressure gauge. This will fill the tires properly.
3. The TPMS readings in the car will now show a lower pressure (1 psi for every 2000' of altitude). Perform the "TPMS Learn New Pressures" procedure (Controls > Service > Reset TPMS Sensors > Learn new Pressures). This will tell the car that the current TPMS readings are now your "normal" pressures. This will silence any alarms from the TPMS system unless the tires actually get low.
4. This will not affect the TPMS readings -- they will still show lower pressure than the gauge. Keep that in mind when monitoring your tire pressures.

@SomeJoe7777 this is seriously one of the BEST answers I've received here (and I've received some good ones)! You've included both amazing background and a step by step solution. Answers like this will elevate you from "Marginally Well Known Member" to "Very Well Known Member" :) Thank you!
 

SomeJoe7777

Marginally-Known Member
Mar 28, 2015
2,191
5,686
Houston, TX
I apologize for being a dunce but I still do not get this.

What is the TPMS sensor measuring ?

All pressures are measured as a differential pressure between two things:

Absolute Pressure - Absolute pressure is the pressure of a gas, referenced to a pure vaccuum. Absolute pressure is give in units of pounds per square inch, absolute, or psia. Example: Sea-level atmospheric pressure is 14.7 psia. This means the atmosphere is exerting 14.7 pounds per square inch on every surface it is in contact with, whereas a pure vaccuum would exert no pressure.

Gauge Pressure - Gauge pressure is the pressure of a gas, referenced to the current atmospheric pressure outside the chamber where the pressurized gas is. Gauge pressure is typically reported as psi, or psig. Example: The Model 3 placard tire pressure is 42 psig. This means that the pressure inside the tire is exactly 42 psi above the pressure outside the tire (atmospheric pressure).

When you use a manual pressure gauge on your tire, you are measuring gauge pressure. Let's say we fill a tire to 42 psig at sea level. There is a fixed amount of gas inside the tire, and a fixed pressure outside the tire, and they differ by 42 psi. Now we drive to 10,000 feet elevation. The same fixed amount of gas is still inside the tire, but there is now less pressure outside the tire due to the increase in elevation. Measuring the gauge pressure now will read 47 psig, because the air pressure outside the tire has dropped by 5 psi.

TPMS measures the absolute pressure of the air inside the tire. When we filled our tire to 42 psig at sea level, the absolute pressure inside the tire was 42 + 14.7 = 56.7 psia. The TPMS module reads this pressure, subtracts sea-level absolute pressure from it (56.7 psia - 14.7 psia = 42 psig) and reports that value to the car. The TPMS readings are 42 psig, which match the manual gauge at sea level.

When we drive to 10,000 feet elevation, the same absolute pressure is inside the tire (56.7 psia). The same calculation is performed because the TPMS modules do not know our elevation, nor do they know the atmospheric pressure outside the tire. They report the same 42 psig to the car.

But for the gauge, we have 56.7 psia inside the tire, and now 9.7 psia outside the tire (the elevation caused the outside atmospheric pressure to drop from 14.7 psia to 9.7 psia). The gauge measures the difference = 56.7 psia - 9.7 psia = 47 psig. This is different from the TPMS reading by 5 psi, the same as the difference in atmospheric pressure.

Now, which reading is "correct"? The answer is the gauge reading. The manufacturer of the tire guarantees it's performance based on actual forces on the rubber, steel belts, and beads. The forces are based on the differential pressure between the inside and outside of the tire, not the absolute pressure inside the tire. Thus, the gauge pressure is the one that needs to be set correctly.

As an example, if I set the tire at 42 psig at sea level, and then drive to 10,000 feet, the gauge reading becomes 47 psig. The ride becomes harsh, and the handling capability goes down. Letting air out so that the gauge pressure reads 42 psig again restores the comfortable ride.

Also note that all of the above discussion assumes constant temperature. Temperature is another variable in the tire pressure equation. Every 10 degree Fahrenheit drop in temperature lowers tire gauge pressure by 1 psig. This is because the gas inside the tire is a fixed volume, but when colder it exerts less pressure. Note that driving to a high elevation frequently causes the change in gauge pressure due to elevation and the change in gauge pressure due to temperature to offset each other. If I'm at 70F at sea level and drive to 40F at 6000 feet, there will be no change in gauge pressure. (+3 psig on the gauge from 6000 feet elevation, -3 psig on the gauge from temperature drop of 30F = no change). TPMS, however, gets affected by temperature, so TPMS gets -3 psig reading from the 30F drop and again mismatches the gauge pressure.

Examples:
Sea Level, 70F: Tire Absolute = 56.7 psia, Atmosphere Absolute = 14.7 psia, Gauge = 42 psig, TPMS = 42 psi.
6000 feet, 70F: Tire Absolute = 56.7 psia (no temperature change), Atmosphere Absolute = 11.7 psia (-3 psia due to elevation), Gauge = 45 psig, TPMS = 42 psi, Ride = Got harsher, tire overinflated.

Sea Level, 70F: Tire Absolute = 56.7 psia, Atmosphere Absolute = 14.7 psia, Gauge = 42 psig, TPMS = 42 psi.
Sea Level, 40F: Tire Absolute = 53.7 psia (-3 psia due to temperature drop), Atmosphere Absolute = 14.7 psia (no change in elevation), Gauge = 39 psig, TPMS = 39 psi, Ride = Got softer, tire underinflated.

Sea Level, 70F: Tire Absolute = 56.7 psia, Atmosphere Absolute = 14.7 psia, Gauge = 42 psig, TPMS = 42 psi.
6000 feet, 40F: Tire Absolute = 53.7 psia (-3 psi due to temperature drop), Atmosphere Absolute = 11.7 psia (-3 psia due to elevation), Gauge = 42 psig, TPMS = 39 psi, Ride = Same as sea level, correct inflation.
 

Products we're discussing on TMC...

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top