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Will Tesla disable my supercharging?

Would you take the Tesla on this trip?


  • Total voters
    51
Long story short -- I own a salvage title Tesla. Have driven it around 10K miles without any issues. Accident happened about 15K miles ago. The Tesla still supercharges and gets updates. Wouldn't be able to tell it is a salvage title car if I didn't tell you. Car is not re-certified by Tesla.

This weekend I am going on a 7 hour drive. There are superchargers along the way, BUT technically Tesla can disable my supercharging privileges at their pleasure. It's a gamble but with gas prices this high, I REALLY do not want to take my ICE.

What would you do? As of now, I am planning on taking the Tesla regardless but I would hate to get stuck half way.
 

bob_p

Active Member
Apr 5, 2012
3,738
2,947
For anyone purchasing as salvaged Tesla, they should assume Tesla will cut them off from supercharging, software updates, Internet access, and internet use by the media player & navigation system - until Tesla has re-certified the car. Until then preparing for other charging options is prudent.

However, until Tesla has reviewed the charging system and battery pack, there is increased risk of unseen damage to those systems, which could cause problems when charging. Charging pumps a lot of power into the car (especially during supercharging) - which could produce a fire or possibly even an explosion.

This will be true not only for Tesla cars - but for any EV being recovered from salvage with large battery packs. ICEs are different, if the engine starts and seems to be running without issues, the ICE is probably OK. An EV has a lot of components that are not visible - and could be damaged, and even though they appear to work - risk failure over time.

The OP should strongly consider having Tesla re-certify the car, even if it will incur a significant expense.

Tesla should probably also provide some information on their website about their policy on re-certifying salvaged cars, and why that should be done.
 

azred

Active Member
Apr 12, 2016
2,143
3,297
Chandler, AZ
As @Az_Rael said, get and take a CHAdeMO adapter. Won't be Supercharger fast, but you won't be stranded. Also check into getting the car recertified by Tesla. Won't be cheap, but it's better than getting Supercharger access cut off in the middle of Nebraska.
If any Nebraskans read this thread, what do you think of this shot from a resident of scenic Ohio?
 
ICEs are different, if the engine starts and seems to be running without issues, the ICE is probably OK.

Different, yes. But more reliable? Not to mention safer? I would greatly disagree with that. There are fuel lines, transmission lines, oil lines, running all up and down the vehicles. All those fluids are flammable. The transmission, the differential, the engine, all have oil and other components which are flammable. Not to speak of of the myriad number of components that must work properly for an ice vehicle to work at all!

If anything, I think ice vehicles are much worse after being wrecked, as far as reliability and safty goes, then electric cars. An electric car is certainly easier to check out. They are just a lot more expensive to do so now.
 

MorrisonHiker

Well-Known Member
Moderator
Mar 8, 2015
10,553
10,585
Colorado
I could better answer this poll if I knew the OP's VIN. ;)

If any Nebraskans read this thread, what do you think of this shot from a resident of scenic Ohio?
I don't live in Nebraska but have driven several thousand miles in Nebraska over the past month. It's a valid jab. There's virtually no CHAdeMO in Nebraska. According to PlugShare, there one in Lincoln is the only CHAdeMO station in all of Nebraska.

You really can't rely on CHAdeMO in large parts of the US.
 
Last edited:
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If any Nebraskans read this thread, what do you think of this shot from a resident of scenic Ohio?
I can hop-scotch across Ohio on only CHAdeMO if I really want to. It's fun to joke about Ohio (one of my favorite past times, alongside corn and being superior to Michigan), but it's worth noting that Ohio is actually quite populated compared to most states. 6 times as many people as Nebraska in 60% of the space. Also a 60% larger population your Arizona in 1/3 the space.

All of which is to say... unless you live in an area with a decent population density across the breadth of your travel area, CHAdeMO coverage will probably let you down. Take Arizona, for example. Getting between Phoenix and Tuscon on CHAdeMO alone is a breeze. But then you're in a desert — Coachella is the closest to the east, and that's 250 miles away. Vegas is 300 miles, so also barely in range of the longest-range Teslas. Want to go East? Too bad, the next CHAdeMO chargers are 420 miles away in Albuquerque.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: croman
Different, yes. But more reliable? Not to mention safer? I would greatly disagree with that. There are fuel lines, transmission lines, oil lines, running all up and down the vehicles. All those fluids are flammable. The transmission, the differential, the engine, all have oil and other components which are flammable. Not to speak of of the myriad number of components that must work properly for an ice vehicle to work at all!

If anything, I think ice vehicles are much worse after being wrecked, as far as reliability and safty goes, then electric cars. An electric car is certainly easier to check out. They are just a lot more expensive to do so now.
Comparison doesn’t work as well because last I checked, nobody died instantaneously from touching gasoline.
 
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Long story short -- I own a salvage title Tesla. Have driven it around 10K miles without any issues. Accident happened about 15K miles ago. The Tesla still supercharges and gets updates. Wouldn't be able to tell it is a salvage title car if I didn't tell you. Car is not re-certified by Tesla.

This weekend I am going on a 7 hour drive. There are superchargers along the way, BUT technically Tesla can disable my supercharging privileges at their pleasure. It's a gamble but with gas prices this high, I REALLY do not want to take my ICE.

What would you do? As of now, I am planning on taking the Tesla regardless but I would hate to get stuck half way.
I certainly wouldn’t be asking this question on a forum which is known to to frequented by Tesla employees....
 
Can you guys all stop with the misinformation? I've rebuilt over 10 Tesla cars and they all have supercharging enabled, LTE working, and still receive updates. Depending on the service center, they will service your car as long as you pay.

To OP, if you are really this worried, have your car rooted and it can be re-enabled remotely if Tesla ever does disable it.
 
For anyone purchasing as salvaged Tesla, they should assume Tesla will cut them off from supercharging, software updates, Internet access, and internet use by the media player & navigation system - until Tesla has re-certified the car. Until then preparing for other charging options is prudent.

However, until Tesla has reviewed the charging system and battery pack, there is increased risk of unseen damage to those systems, which could cause problems when charging. Charging pumps a lot of power into the car (especially during supercharging) - which could produce a fire or possibly even an explosion.

This will be true not only for Tesla cars - but for any EV being recovered from salvage with large battery packs. ICEs are different, if the engine starts and seems to be running without issues, the ICE is probably OK. An EV has a lot of components that are not visible - and could be damaged, and even though they appear to work - risk failure over time.

The OP should strongly consider having Tesla re-certify the car, even if it will incur a significant expense.

Tesla should probably also provide some information on their website about their policy on re-certifying salvaged cars, and why that should be done.

If any of the HV systems have an issue, you won't even be able to charge the car.
 

azred

Active Member
Apr 12, 2016
2,143
3,297
Chandler, AZ
I can hop-scotch across Ohio on only CHAdeMO if I really want to. It's fun to joke about Ohio (one of my favorite past times, alongside corn and being superior to Michigan), but it's worth noting that Ohio is actually quite populated compared to most states. 6 times as many people as Nebraska in 60% of the space. Also a 60% larger population your Arizona in 1/3 the space.

All of which is to say... unless you live in an area with a decent population density across the breadth of your travel area, CHAdeMO coverage will probably let you down. Take Arizona, for example. Getting between Phoenix and Tuscon on CHAdeMO alone is a breeze. But then you're in a desert — Coachella is the closest to the east, and that's 250 miles away. Vegas is 300 miles, so also barely in range of the longest-range Teslas. Want to go East? Too bad, the next CHAdeMO chargers are 420 miles away in Albuquerque.
Just trying to get the Husker fans fired up before the Buckeyes visit Lincoln this Fall.
 
Comparison doesn’t work as well because last I checked, nobody died instantaneously from touching gasoline

Perhaps not instantly, but certainly painfully and within a few minutes.

04FDF54C-7A8E-4F8A-9FE7-633D658157E6.jpeg
 
  • Funny
Reactions: David99

trm2

Active Member
Apr 3, 2016
1,085
1,718
CLE
I can hop-scotch across Ohio on only CHAdeMO if I really want to. It's fun to joke about Ohio (one of my favorite past times, alongside corn and being superior to Michigan), but it's worth noting that Ohio is actually quite populated compared to most states. 6 times as many people as Nebraska in 60% of the space. Also a 60% larger population your Arizona in 1/3 the space.

All of which is to say... unless you live in an area with a decent population density across the breadth of your travel area, CHAdeMO coverage will probably let you down. Take Arizona, for example. Getting between Phoenix and Tuscon on CHAdeMO alone is a breeze. But then you're in a desert — Coachella is the closest to the east, and that's 250 miles away. Vegas is 300 miles, so also barely in range of the longest-range Teslas. Want to go East? Too bad, the next CHAdeMO chargers are 420 miles away in Albuquerque.

Perhaps not instantly, but certainly painfully and within a few minutes.

04FDF54C-7A8E-4F8A-9FE7-633D658157E6.jpeg
Wow, references to Coachella and Burning Man in one thread!
 

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