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2016 X price and acceleration vs 2022 LR

DCGOO

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Nov 24, 2015
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Indianapolis, IN
u sure about this?
i keep seeing screen caps of car details pop-up n only front is perm magnet, with rear still induction...
what is used on Performance Refresh?
Two permanent magnet motors is why the refresh is faster 670 HP (I think the Ravens produced 500 - 550 HP). The Refresh Performance = the Plaid, with three motors, 1020 HP. Earlier versions (pre-refresh) only had a front permanent magnet motor.
 
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Two permanent magnet motors is why the refresh is faster 670 HP (I think the Ravens produced 500 - 550 HP). The Refresh Performance = the Plaid, with three motors, 1020 HP. Earlier versions (pre-refresh) only had a front permanent magnet motor.
Thanks!
I think I got confused with Raven vs Refresh. I thought those were the same...
Does anyone know when Tesla stopped using LDU thats prone to issues?
 
One concern I’d have with one of the 2016s is that this was the first production year of the X. Is there any reliability concerns with that year?
I also bought a similar vehicle to the OP...

Being a first year vehicle there are some things noticeable, like slightly off panel gaps, and perhaps some trim noise inside. Also the exterior paint finishes are not that great or consistent compared to other brands.

Also there's the known half shaft issues but that also affects a few years after not just limited to the first year. The rear spoiler flaking occurred but Tesla replaced that for me this recently for 2016 vehicle which is really nice.
Some things did occur, but were quite easily rectified by some googling:
-12v battery died, replaced myself $210 cdn
-air suspension stopped working. Located fuse and replaced it with another, $5 cdn.
-tires worn down

Other than that, as its my secondary vehicle, i Dont use it much, and i love many of the exclusive things of these first year p90dls that are absent in later years:
-active spoiler is a nice feature, and is pretty cool.
-glossy seatbacks look sharp in the 6 seater
-alcantara upper dash and headliner
-ventilated/cooled seats
-red brake calipers on p models
-unlimited free supercharging/data
-autopilot works fine for highway, better than some newer cars of other brands
-huge screens are still better than other brands.
-beautiful windshield
-low purchase price in 2020 of about $80k CDN, mid $60s usd.
-ongoing software updates keeps the car tech up to date. Amazing for an out of warranty product.

I have a brand new 2022 audi as a daily driver for my family but my 2016 mx is much more of a novelty to me. A think a newer mx would not give me the same feeling.
 
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These are all problems with brand-new cars too (though I'm not sure we have a good idea of how good/bad tire wear is on the Refresh X yet)

If you're already gung-ho about the car and just must have one, I don't think there's a lot of downside with going with an old one if you're ok with lack of range/performance compared to the new ones. That's assuming you can actually get an older one for a sane price, but I think that's coming soon

The '18 a family member just picked up was in amazingly nice shape with 44k on it. Easy to forget these are very nice cars when you're using one as the family hauler day-in and day-out. People seem to take care of them and they seem to hold up pretty well (in that, they don't get any worse than they were from the factory, which wasn't exactly perfect, lol). Still seems insane to pay close to the new asking price for these older models, but I suppose if you're in a positiion to trade something in for an equally insane price it's not as big of a deal
 
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I also bought a similar vehicle to the OP...

Being a first year vehicle there are some things noticeable, like slightly off panel gaps, and perhaps some trim noise inside. Also the exterior paint finishes are not that great or consistent compared to other brands.

Also there's the known half shaft issues but that also affects a few years after not just limited to the first year. The rear spoiler flaking occurred but Tesla replaced that for me this recently for 2016 vehicle which is really nice.
Some things did occur, but were quite easily rectified by some googling:
-12v battery died, replaced myself $210 cdn
-air suspension stopped working. Located fuse and replaced it with another, $5 cdn.
-tires worn down

Other than that, as its my secondary vehicle, i Dont use it much, and i love many of the exclusive things of these first year p90dls that are absent in later years:
-active spoiler is a nice feature, and is pretty cool.
-glossy seatbacks look sharp in the 6 seater
-alcantara upper dash and headliner
-ventilated/cooled seats
-red brake calipers on p models
-unlimited free supercharging/data
-autopilot works fine for highway, better than some newer cars of other brands
-huge screens are still better than other brands.
-beautiful windshield
-low purchase price in 2020 of about $80k CDN, mid $60s usd.
-ongoing software updates keeps the car tech up to date. Amazing for an out of warranty product.

I have a brand new 2022 audi as a daily driver for my family but my 2016 mx is much more of a novelty to me. A think a newer mx would not give me the same feeling.
Thanks this is all very reassuring! I'm eyeing a '17 P100D for 80k USD with low miles (20k). This post might just push me over the edge.
 
Thanks this is all very reassuring! I'm eyeing a '17 P100D for 80k USD with low miles (20k). This post might just push me over the edge.
That sounds like a pretty good deal.
i would budget a few thousand on the side the change out the half-shafts eventually.
Also check if it's been upgraded to mcu2. If not you can budget it in. I personally have not done it yet but the majority strongly recommend it.

One thing i forgot to mention are the shocks or control arm joint (forgot the exact term) needs some grease/lube topup for these older ones, which was done free by tesla during one of the service visits.
 
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ngng

Active Member
Jul 23, 2018
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Bay Area
That sounds like a pretty good deal.
i would budget a few thousand on the side the change out the half-shafts eventually.
Also check if it's been upgraded to mcu2. If not you can budget it in. I personally have not done it yet but the majority strongly recommend it.

One thing i forgot to mention are the shocks or control arm joint (forgot the exact term) needs some grease/lube topup for these older ones, which was done free by tesla during one of the service visits.
I would spend the money on an XCare warranty instead.
 
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X.l.r.8

Active Member
Supporting Member
Feb 18, 2018
1,653
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Toronto/Tampa
I also bought a similar vehicle to the OP...

Being a first year vehicle there are some things noticeable, like slightly off panel gaps, and perhaps some trim noise inside. Also the exterior paint finishes are not that great or consistent compared to other brands.

Also there's the known half shaft issues but that also affects a few years after not just limited to the first year. The rear spoiler flaking occurred but Tesla replaced that for me this recently for 2016 vehicle which is really nice.
Some things did occur, but were quite easily rectified by some googling:
-12v battery died, replaced myself $210 cdn
-air suspension stopped working. Located fuse and replaced it with another, $5 cdn.
-tires worn down

Other than that, as its my secondary vehicle, i Dont use it much, and i love many of the exclusive things of these first year p90dls that are absent in later years:
-active spoiler is a nice feature, and is pretty cool.
-glossy seatbacks look sharp in the 6 seater
-alcantara upper dash and headliner
-ventilated/cooled seats
-red brake calipers on p models
-unlimited free supercharging/data
-autopilot works fine for highway, better than some newer cars of other brands
-huge screens are still better than other brands.
-beautiful windshield
-low purchase price in 2020 of about $80k CDN, mid $60s usd.
-ongoing software updates keeps the car tech up to date. Amazing for an out of warranty product.

I have a brand new 2022 audi as a daily driver for my family but my 2016 mx is much more of a novelty to me. A think a newer mx would not give me the same feeling.
You have the car I'm looking for. I need the rear entry for my parents to get in and out so I came on this thread looking for reassurance that and older X is worthy of replacing my older S. Its not something I ever looked into before.
 
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X.l.r.8

Active Member
Supporting Member
Feb 18, 2018
1,653
1,107
Toronto/Tampa
Out of curiosity which model S do you have and how has your ownership experience been with it?
2016 90d facelift full everything package. I had to have the rear tailgate lock replaced (warranty). 160k km on it, charges to 435km. Wiper blades, tires and it’s getting a bit old now are my only complaints, it’s been a great car. I only got one because my roadster was waiting for a month for a part and they gave me one for a loaner, my wife drove M-Benz so naturally felt at home in one so we traded. I regularly go to Florida or Seattle. I don’t like that the front lip folds over on the hood over time as I use the frunk a lot. I also drive my parents around to Ottawa as they no longer drive, it’s getting harder for my father to get in and out of now. Otherwise it’s been faultless, other than the MCU is getting slower, sometimes it takes 20 seconds to do long route planning. Love the sunroof although I rarely use it because I’m never alone in that car. Oh and I use the 72a onboard charger a lot, again my lifestyle is based around my roadster 70a charging times so it’s nice to have the larger onboard charger. I guess I’m one of the lucky ones.
 
2016 90d facelift full everything package. I had to have the rear tailgate lock replaced (warranty). 160k km on it, charges to 435km. Wiper blades, tires and it’s getting a bit old now are my only complaints, it’s been a great car. I only got one because my roadster was waiting for a month for a part and they gave me one for a loaner, my wife drove M-Benz so naturally felt at home in one so we traded. I regularly go to Florida or Seattle. I don’t like that the front lip folds over on the hood over time as I use the frunk a lot. I also drive my parents around to Ottawa as they no longer drive, it’s getting harder for my father to get in and out of now. Otherwise it’s been faultless, other than the MCU is getting slower, sometimes it takes 20 seconds to do long route planning. Love the sunroof although I rarely use it because I’m never alone in that car. Oh and I use the 72a onboard charger a lot, again my lifestyle is based around my roadster 70a charging times so it’s nice to have the larger onboard charger. I guess I’m one of the lucky ones.
Thanks for the great write up! I have my eyes on a p100d that comes with the 72a charger. How do you use that a lot of you don’t mind me asking? Is it faster charging at home or at non-superchargers that is useful?
 

DCGOO

Active Member
Supporting Member
Nov 24, 2015
2,837
1,977
Indianapolis, IN
Thanks for the great write up! I have my eyes on a p100d that comes with the 72a charger. How do you use that a lot of you don’t mind me asking? Is it faster charging at home or at non-superchargers that is useful?
If you run a 100 (or 90) amp circuit to the charger, it can charge at up to 72 amps which means the car will charge in roughly two thirds of the time it takes at 48 amps. So if my car would charge up in three hours at 48 amps, it would take two hours at 72 amps. Whether that difference is significant to you depends on your usage and charging patterns.

Even though my 2018 could charge at 72 amps, the extra equipment requirement for circuits over 60 amps, I just ran a 60 amp circuit and set my wall connectors to provide 48 amps maximum. The load sharing cut that in half if both cars were charging.
 

X.l.r.8

Active Member
Supporting Member
Feb 18, 2018
1,653
1,107
Toronto/Tampa
For me personally I only had the roadster so no level 3 charging ability and I drive a lot of long trips and sometimes I want a quick turn around so I have the clipper creek TS-90. It made sense to get similar charging specs on the S rather then use supercharging. The roadster HPWC to Tesla adaptor was also way cheaper than the Tesla HPWC to roadster one.
If you are used to certain charging behaviors it’s hard to change, even going from the old UMC 240 at 40a to the Canadian spec 32A was not pleasant. I had to get another plug from the US of A to regain the 40a.
It’s just nice to have the option, especially if you are going to exclusively charge at home, or arrive home on empty and want to go grocery shopping soon after. It’s really about choosing what suits your lifestyle. The game changer for me would be more higher amperage level 2 chargers like there used to be. Now everything is 32A.
 

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