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Brand new MY road trip: the good and the ugly

MicklePickle

New Member
Jun 21, 2021
1
4
Washington State
I purchased my first Tesla 5 days ago, and took it on a 1,500 mile road trip the next day. I've wanted a Tesla since the early rumors of the original Roadster, so this was a grand occasion. Here are some of my observations:

The manual driving experience is terrific: Smooth, more-than-ample power coupled with surprisingly good handling. Love it!

But the automation? Oh, my. This car is buggy, bordering on dangerous. Over the course of the 1,500 miles, I had probably 20 random braking events using basic cruise control. For most of them, I couldn't come up with any plausible guess as to why the brakes came on hard for 2-3 seconds, then resumed normal cruising, as if to say, "Oops, sorry dude, my bad." But I quickly learned not to use Autopilot-cruise when in anything more than very light traffic. Slamming on the brakes is just asking for trouble.

Two days later, Autopilot decided my wipers had to be on. In this case it was a cloudless summer evening and the sun was low in the sky, so lighting conditions were odd. It took awhile to figure out why the wipers were coming on (intermittent mode), but we narrowed it down. Every time we engaged Autopilot, the wipers would take nicely timed swipes across freshly splatted bugs, dust - everything but rain. I stopped for a bit and cleaned the windshield (and cameras) of all the freshly smeared bug guts, but it didn't help. The wipers still came on every time.

That same evening, after sunset, the automatic headlights turned on for the first time. Cool! After about 10 seconds, they switched to high beams, even though there was a car about 100 feet ahead. I manually turned off the high beams. Later I decided to try full Autosteer to see how it behaved at dusk. The moment I engaged it, the headlights switched to high beams, totally oblivious to the fact that there were cars ahead and cars approaching me. I canceled it quick.

At one point on the trip the screen went black and apparently rebooted. Thankfully I could drive just fine during the blackout, but I have to admit I was fearing all hell was about to break loose.

Thing is, Tesla is supposed to be in the forefront of automatic driving systems, yet the 2019 car I traded in (rhymes with Who Are You) didn't have these problems. Sure, it was underpowered and doesn't offer FSD or fart, but what it does, it does well. Its adaptive cruise control works smoothly and reliably, and never comes rushing up on somebody's bumper before it decelerates. Its automatic headlights dim exactly when you'd do it yourself, and go back to bright only when the coast is clear.

More importantly, shouldn't these the most-basic functions be foolproof before you starting layering on the greater complexities of full self driving?

Anyway, I like my new Tesla. It drives great (manually) and does some cool things. But I don't love it. There are fundamental functions I'm afraid to use, and I'm not so sure I would buy this car again.
 

Madsen203

May 26, MYLR, White ext, Black int, Tow, 19”
Jun 1, 2021
314
235
Bay Area
My test drive experience made me fall out of love with the automation. To your point, the manual driving experience was fantastic and the charging network and home connection made it worthwhile. I really like the phone as a key and credit card key. The battery and range are great.

not a perfect car but it’s close. With updates, TACC may improve in the next year or two and make it usable in traffic. As the competition increases, it’ll be more about focusing on the SW versus the production numbers it currently chases as a company.
 

Fourdoor

Member
May 31, 2016
885
699
North East Arkansas
My test drive experience made me fall out of love with the automation. To your point, the manual driving experience was fantastic and the charging network and home connection made it worthwhile. I really like the phone as a key and credit card key. The battery and range are great.

not a perfect car but it’s close. With updates, TACC may improve in the next year or two and make it usable in traffic. As the competition increases, it’ll be more about focusing on the SW versus the production numbers it currently chases as a company.

Many OEM's have autonomous systems as good or better than TACC and AP... but good luck convincing the fanboys of that. I hope that as more "normie" owners get vocal Tesla will actually fix some of the issues that the fanboys gloss over and don't report as issues. Hard for the company to fix something when the current crop of drivers calls it a "feature" rather than reporting it as a bug! I absolutely hated AP and TACC on my test drive, hoping that they have improved in the year or so since I last test drove an FSD equipped car.

Keith
 

astrocling

Member
May 25, 2021
23
35
Ohio
I haven't been on a longer road trip yet but in a couple hundred miles I've definitely found my gripes in the Autopilot and Cruse Control. No problems with headlights really or wipers, but I do have to take control a lot, and for me the bigger thing is that I'm learning my area must not have a lot of speed limit signs. There are a lot of roads where the speed limit is 45 and autopilot is limiting to 25 or the speedlimit is 60 and it is limited to 40. My autopilot experience hasn't been amazing, but its not quite as bad as what the OP is saying. I really think a lot of this is related to the radarless implementation and its going to improve (I believe rather quickly) most likely in future software releases as Tesla becomes more comfortable with the new sensor array.
 

Schulz1983

Model Y LR AWD: Matte PPF, Vossen HF-1
May 14, 2021
565
378
High Ridge MO
We have accomplished several Midwest to east coast road trips. The auto wipers are frustrating. I did find one fix that makes them function on a improved scale. Ceramic coating the windshield really helps to keep them from freaking out when it does rain or no rain. In heavy down pours the wipers still go overboard but chill as soon as the rain calms down.
We have autopilot with radar so I can’t attest to your issues. The radar vehicles do not require the auto windshield wipers or auto high beams to be enabled. I usually never have the auto high beams on as the dims are bright enough for 95% of occasions.
I hope with advancement they fix your issues with autopilot and the car becomes everything you hope. I had some gripes when we bought ours, but most have been resolved with software updates. In my opinion they never should’ve removed radar but I guess it is what it is. I would bet money the plug is there but I’m not sure if it would work if plugged in. I would probably try if I bought a no radar car lol
 

TomServo

Active Member
Apr 10, 2014
1,539
991
Belleville IL
My Y is 10 months old, I’ve not experienced any of the issue you have have except for a “handful” of phantom braking episodes. Re the wipers I applied RainX on day one and seldom use my wipers. I think you got a “buggy” Tesla, in any event ALL those events should be captured and available for a Tesla tech to view them. I suggest scheduling a visit with your Service Center if they continue and let them sort it out for you. good luck.
 

Fourdoor

Member
May 31, 2016
885
699
North East Arkansas
My Y is 10 months old, I’ve not experienced any of the issue you have have except for a “handful” of phantom braking episodes. Re the wipers I applied RainX on day one and seldom use my wipers. I think you got a “buggy” Tesla, in any event ALL those events should be captured and available for a Tesla tech to view them. I suggest scheduling a visit with your Service Center if they continue and let them sort it out for you. good luck.
Your MY has radar, it seems like the new software for the vision only cars has some issues. I am hopeful that they will be resolved quickly.

Keith
 

Iain

Member
Feb 5, 2020
250
503
Austin
Your MY has radar, it seems like the new software for the vision only cars has some issues. I am hopeful that they will be resolved quickly.

Keith
I'm hoping it's fixed quickly with a software update. My guess is maybe try it all again in a few weeks. You just got the car and there's a lot going on. When i got mine i had a few phantom break events but they have gone ages ago. I drive on AP and FSD 90% of the time and it is the best. My lights have never had a problem. In heavy rain my auto wipers will at times given me issues but in 14 months of ownership my car has only gotten better. Tesla is just a superior product but it might take a little while for you to catch up to it.
 

jimmyvegas

Member
Apr 12, 2021
62
106
Kingwood, TX
I have a MY - No Radar delivered May 28th and I completely agree the Autopilot is not the best. At night its constantly flashing the high beams at other cars and phantom braking. System works better during the daytime but at night its pretty useless. Also the speed limitations on Autopilot limit it's usefulness especially in Texas where I'm on the parkway with 75 mile per hour speed limit so not possible to use the system at 80.

Also sentry mode doesn't work on the No Radar cars.

Waiting for a big software update to fix everything.

Had model 3 on order that had a vin a few weeks ago and I've delayed delivery until they resolve the issues on the no radar cars.
 
Apr 7, 2021
902
421
Inland Empire, California
I purchased my first Tesla 5 days ago, and took it on a 1,500 mile road trip the next day. I've wanted a Tesla since the early rumors of the original Roadster, so this was a grand occasion. Here are some of my observations:

The manual driving experience is terrific: Smooth, more-than-ample power coupled with surprisingly good handling. Love it!

But the automation? Oh, my. This car is buggy, bordering on dangerous. Over the course of the 1,500 miles, I had probably 20 random braking events using basic cruise control. For most of them, I couldn't come up with any plausible guess as to why the brakes came on hard for 2-3 seconds, then resumed normal cruising, as if to say, "Oops, sorry dude, my bad." But I quickly learned not to use Autopilot-cruise when in anything more than very light traffic. Slamming on the brakes is just asking for trouble.

Two days later, Autopilot decided my wipers had to be on. In this case it was a cloudless summer evening and the sun was low in the sky, so lighting conditions were odd. It took awhile to figure out why the wipers were coming on (intermittent mode), but we narrowed it down. Every time we engaged Autopilot, the wipers would take nicely timed swipes across freshly splatted bugs, dust - everything but rain. I stopped for a bit and cleaned the windshield (and cameras) of all the freshly smeared bug guts, but it didn't help. The wipers still came on every time.

That same evening, after sunset, the automatic headlights turned on for the first time. Cool! After about 10 seconds, they switched to high beams, even though there was a car about 100 feet ahead. I manually turned off the high beams. Later I decided to try full Autosteer to see how it behaved at dusk. The moment I engaged it, the headlights switched to high beams, totally oblivious to the fact that there were cars ahead and cars approaching me. I canceled it quick.

At one point on the trip the screen went black and apparently rebooted. Thankfully I could drive just fine during the blackout, but I have to admit I was fearing all hell was about to break loose.

Thing is, Tesla is supposed to be in the forefront of automatic driving systems, yet the 2019 car I traded in (rhymes with Who Are You) didn't have these problems. Sure, it was underpowered and doesn't offer FSD or fart, but what it does, it does well. Its adaptive cruise control works smoothly and reliably, and never comes rushing up on somebody's bumper before it decelerates. Its automatic headlights dim exactly when you'd do it yourself, and go back to bright only when the coast is clear.

More importantly, shouldn't these the most-basic functions be foolproof before you starting layering on the greater complexities of full self driving?

Anyway, I like my new Tesla. It drives great (manually) and does some cool things. But I don't love it. There are fundamental functions I'm afraid to use, and I'm not so sure I would buy this car again.
What OS? I noticed i had to do an update immediately after i got my car.
 

boulder.dude

Member
May 20, 2021
84
172
Boulder, Colorado
I purchased my first Tesla 5 days ago, and took it on a 1,500 mile road trip the next day. I've wanted a Tesla since the early rumors of the original Roadster, so this was a grand occasion. Here are some of my observations:

The manual driving experience is terrific: Smooth, more-than-ample power coupled with surprisingly good handling. Love it!

But the automation? Oh, my. This car is buggy, bordering on dangerous. Over the course of the 1,500 miles, I had probably 20 random braking events using basic cruise control. For most of them, I couldn't come up with any plausible guess as to why the brakes came on hard for 2-3 seconds, then resumed normal cruising, as if to say, "Oops, sorry dude, my bad." But I quickly learned not to use Autopilot-cruise when in anything more than very light traffic. Slamming on the brakes is just asking for trouble.

Two days later, Autopilot decided my wipers had to be on. In this case it was a cloudless summer evening and the sun was low in the sky, so lighting conditions were odd. It took awhile to figure out why the wipers were coming on (intermittent mode), but we narrowed it down. Every time we engaged Autopilot, the wipers would take nicely timed swipes across freshly splatted bugs, dust - everything but rain. I stopped for a bit and cleaned the windshield (and cameras) of all the freshly smeared bug guts, but it didn't help. The wipers still came on every time.

That same evening, after sunset, the automatic headlights turned on for the first time. Cool! After about 10 seconds, they switched to high beams, even though there was a car about 100 feet ahead. I manually turned off the high beams. Later I decided to try full Autosteer to see how it behaved at dusk. The moment I engaged it, the headlights switched to high beams, totally oblivious to the fact that there were cars ahead and cars approaching me. I canceled it quick.

At one point on the trip the screen went black and apparently rebooted. Thankfully I could drive just fine during the blackout, but I have to admit I was fearing all hell was about to break loose.

Thing is, Tesla is supposed to be in the forefront of automatic driving systems, yet the 2019 car I traded in (rhymes with Who Are You) didn't have these problems. Sure, it was underpowered and doesn't offer FSD or fart, but what it does, it does well. Its adaptive cruise control works smoothly and reliably, and never comes rushing up on somebody's bumper before it decelerates. Its automatic headlights dim exactly when you'd do it yourself, and go back to bright only when the coast is clear.

More importantly, shouldn't these the most-basic functions be foolproof before you starting layering on the greater complexities of full self driving?

Anyway, I like my new Tesla. It drives great (manually) and does some cool things. But I don't love it. There are fundamental functions I'm afraid to use, and I'm not so sure I would buy this car again.
How was your experience with charging, range, and planning?

We’re planning a 1,500 mile trip (Colorado to NC) in our 2 week old Y.
 

everydaychris

Member
Feb 10, 2020
621
316
CA
interesting
I'm the complete opposite
Doing a video about it
Went to Portland and back, over 2k miles, and had autopilot randomly brake maybe 3 times.
overall it was a dream and its got us thinking of where we can go next
 
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Nov 3, 2019
265
318
Green Valley AZ
I purchased my first Tesla 5 days ago, and took it on a 1,500 mile road trip the next day. .....
Damn. Sorry for your negative experiences. We have our MY since November, drove it from AZ to Cape Cod and the car now has 7,600 miles on it. No issues. Your car sounds so buggy you might want to make a service appointment and have the software checked out.

Rich
 

BryanMT

Member
Jul 31, 2020
13
37
Montana
1 week old MY and I noted the following from a 300 mile trip -

While around town the steering feel is solid and weighty (set on Standard steering) the car feels fairly easily tossed around by both wind, and slightly angled/hilly highway roads. I found myself making fairly constant micro adjustments to the steering when the road wasn't completely flat and smooth. Not necessarily a bad thing, but just different from the other vehicles I've driven on these roads. I suppose the way I'd explain it is that it often felt like the road was steering the car. I also noticed a slightly unsettling feeling on the handful of times I changed lanes and went over the very slight bumps on the line that divided the highway into two lanes.

In the ~30 miles that I had the TACC or AP on, I had 3 phantom braking events. One of them happened when the asphalt on the highway changed from light to dark (guessing re-paved) and the other two I have no idea why - it was overcast, and not raining.

No issues with the auto-wipers except that at one brief point where the rain was really coming down, it wasn't wiping at its max speed and I had to adjust it manually.
 

threeputts

Member
Dec 14, 2020
109
128
Minnesota
Phantom breaking is an issue for sure. I've seen a small decrease in the frequency of incidents with my radar equipped MY, but it still happens sometimes during the day. You can turn off the auto high beams, and if the wipers continue to freak out you can put those in manual mode too. One half press on the end of the left steering wheel stock will swipe the wipers once, full press for wiper fluid plus a wipe. I've had other issues with ours in the 6 months and 11k miles of ownership - heat failed, steering wheel control module failed, driver's mirror adjust had to be fixed on day one. I've heard Tesla described as a tech company making cars, not a car company making EVs, and I think that's a good summary. Even with all that, I can't think of another car I would rather drive (that I can afford anyway). I'm also glad it's not my only vehicle because I never know when the next time I will have to leave it at the Service Center will be.
 

steelersmb

Member
May 29, 2021
9
2
Atlanta
I picked up my MYP the other day and I love driving the car in manual mode but the automatic mode will make your passengers sick. My fiance has been complaining about it since I got the car so now I only play around with it when I'm by myself. I haven't been on the interstate much so I've only been trying it on local streets and I know it's still in beta but I would call it more alpha.
 

tinman1356

Member
Apr 7, 2021
5
5
stamford ct
I purchased my first Tesla 5 days ago, and took it on a 1,500 mile road trip the next day. I've wanted a Tesla since the early rumors of the original Roadster, so this was a grand occasion. Here are some of my observations:

The manual driving experience is terrific: Smooth, more-than-ample power coupled with surprisingly good handling. Love it!

But the automation? Oh, my. This car is buggy, bordering on dangerous. Over the course of the 1,500 miles, I had probably 20 random braking events using basic cruise control. For most of them, I couldn't come up with any plausible guess as to why the brakes came on hard for 2-3 seconds, then resumed normal cruising, as if to say, "Oops, sorry dude, my bad." But I quickly learned not to use Autopilot-cruise when in anything more than very light traffic. Slamming on the brakes is just asking for trouble.

Two days later, Autopilot decided my wipers had to be on. In this case it was a cloudless summer evening and the sun was low in the sky, so lighting conditions were odd. It took awhile to figure out why the wipers were coming on (intermittent mode), but we narrowed it down. Every time we engaged Autopilot, the wipers would take nicely timed swipes across freshly splatted bugs, dust - everything but rain. I stopped for a bit and cleaned the windshield (and cameras) of all the freshly smeared bug guts, but it didn't help. The wipers still came on every time.

That same evening, after sunset, the automatic headlights turned on for the first time. Cool! After about 10 seconds, they switched to high beams, even though there was a car about 100 feet ahead. I manually turned off the high beams. Later I decided to try full Autosteer to see how it behaved at dusk. The moment I engaged it, the headlights switched to high beams, totally oblivious to the fact that there were cars ahead and cars approaching me. I canceled it quick.

At one point on the trip the screen went black and apparently rebooted. Thankfully I could drive just fine during the blackout, but I have to admit I was fearing all hell was about to break loose.

Thing is, Tesla is supposed to be in the forefront of automatic driving systems, yet the 2019 car I traded in (rhymes with Who Are You) didn't have these problems. Sure, it was underpowered and doesn't offer FSD or fart, but what it does, it does well. Its adaptive cruise control works smoothly and reliably, and never comes rushing up on somebody's bumper before it decelerates. Its automatic headlights dim exactly when you'd do it yourself, and go back to bright only when the coast is clear.

More importantly, shouldn't these the most-basic functions be foolproof before you starting layering on the greater complexities of full self driving?

Anyway, I like my new Tesla. It drives great (manually) and does some cool things. But I don't love it. There are fundamental functions I'm afraid to use, and I'm not so sure I would buy this car again.
give it some time I think you will change your mind mine was kind of strange but once it got to know me Tessy behaved well. good luck and don't for to re booth
 

Pianewman

Active Member
Oct 28, 2020
1,378
939
Fort Worth
I have to say hearing about immediate road trips right after delivery of ANY new car makes me very nervous. I always put a few hundred miles on a new car prior to feeling confident that there are no issues.

I strongly recommend getting an alignment check prior to embarking on a LONG road trip in a new car. All manufacturers fall victim to sloppy alignments from the factory, which should be checked as part of "dealer prep." There are enough posts in this forum to back up this claim.

Also, a few cars have been sold with wheel lug nuts improperly torqued. Should be 126 lb/ft. Mine came with under 70lb/ft. :eek: :eek:

Tesla sized tires are expensive. You won't notice any unusual wear until it's too late to save the tire(s).

Bryan MT: My 12/2020 manufactured MYLR, with 9k miles, tracks perfectly straight, even over irregular surfaces. I recommend having your alignment checked.
 
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buyleonard

Member
Jan 4, 2020
46
64
Oregon
I'm lucky, I guess, but I've put a few hundred miles on my pure vision Model Y, and so far it has been great. I've only really used it on freeway, but no phantom breaking. Only two issues is slowing down when there is a yellow flashing light (on the freeway) and wipers going crazy when I got a smushed bug right over the camera that the wipers couldn't clean away.
 
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