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Buying decision used LR (2019) or refreshed SR+ (2021)

I meant the CCS2-Combo, for DC fast charging. I think you can also use those without an adapter. In America we have a Tesla proprietary port so only the Tesla Superchargers work without an adapter.

I sometimes leave home from a heated garage (~12C) but you are right, some of those drives might have been with a cold battery. I think it's more about heating the cabin that makes a bit hit to consumption when you start a drive, but a cold battery would also be somewhat less efficient. In particular the regen might be limited or nonexistent, but then again on the highway you don't use regen much.
Yes, I believe that with a light foot you could do more range. Your 300km round-trip is not crazy. You could charge to 100% before leaving, and maybe you have an opportunity to plug in a 120V (240V in your case?) socket at your destination for a few hours and gain a few percent? I don't even think it's required but it's always a security. With that said, the one time you might be short you just stop to charge on a DCFC for 2 minutes and go.
 
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A place i go to regularly (4-5 times a year maybe) is around 150km (around 95mi) away, so roundtrip 300km. I'd really like to make that without having to charge

If you 100% cannot charge at your destination or have 2-5 minutes to supercharge on the return leg, then the LR would be a better bet. But if you could plug in at all, or is willing to stop for even a few minutes to top up when you're close to home on the return leg, the SR+ will be sufficient as well. It most probably can just do the whole round trip without charging in the summer anyway if you start at 90-100% charge.
 
Right. I just searched it and only now realized that i've seen the Tesla proprietary port on many videos. Teslas sold in Switzerland have either a typ2 or the CCS2-Combo port you mentioned. I reckon the model 3's should all have a CCS2-Combo.

I guess that's true. From what i've learned, preheating the cabin can help a lot. And using heated seats in combination with a lower cabin temperature as opposed to only having (a higher) cabin temperature during drive can also help.
It didn't really occur to me during this discussion. When i was thinking charging on route, i was thinking = around 30mins. But if i only have to charge to make sure i get home/to the destination, i can just stop for 10 minutes, grab a coffee and go again. If the attached image is to be trusted, charging 10 minutes on a CCS2 or supercharger would yield over 150km of range already.
Table-Model3-V3-Supercharging-Time.jpg
 
Ah, charging fast is another topic. Yes charging is fast, but in two conditions : your battery is at a low SOC and it's hot enough. Especially in winter you'll need to navigate to the supercharger to heat the battery. You can search for the model 3 charging curve to learn about how charging slows down as the battery fills up.

You might need even less than 10min to make it home.
 
Ah, charging fast is another topic. Yes charging is fast, but in two conditions : your battery is at a low SOC and it's hot enough. Especially in winter you'll need to navigate to the supercharger to heat the battery. You can search for the model 3 charging curve to learn about how charging slows down as the battery fills up.

You might need even less than 10min to make it home.
My assumption is that when i stop somewhere on route to charge, that would usually be with a decently low battery so charging should be pretty fast.
I have read multiple times that setting a supercharger as a destination starts pre-conditioning the battery pack to charge faster. Assuming I'd want to fast charge at a normal CCS2-Combo charger, is there a way to pre-condition without setting a supercharger as destination?
 

Hiline

Member
Supporting Member
Apr 16, 2022
134
190
Los Angeles
Hello all,

From my reading of previous threads, LR seems to be the better option for Model 3, and delivery of new vehicles is likely to be moved back. I ordered a new SR a week ago and got EDD 5-6 months out. I wasn’t a fan of a buying used since used Model 3’s aren’t exactly cheap.

However, upon taking a closer look at the used inventory and the financials, I noticed several 2019 LR units with around 50k miles that would cost about the same as a 2022 SR vehicle since new vehicles have thousands of dollars of fees tacked on. The older cars would also come with FSD which doesn’t really matter with current technologies. I’ve also learned that the 2019 version has adjustable lumbar support which is pretty important to me since I have a long work commute.

So for about the same price, if I go the old car route, I get basically immediate delivery, LR as opposed to SR, FSD, and better lumbar support, for 50k mileage, 3 years old, and less warranty. The physical improvements from 2019 to 2022 from what I’ve read are minor.

The EV rebates are negligible at this point. I’m in CA.

So all in all it sounds like the used car route is more lucrative. Is there anything I may be missing here?

Thanks in advance for weighing in.
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
14,234
17,968
Riverside Co. CA
Hello all,

From my reading of previous threads, LR seems to be the better option for Model 3, and delivery of new vehicles is likely to be moved back. I ordered a new SR a week ago and got EDD 5-6 months out. I wasn’t a fan of a buying used since used Model 3’s aren’t exactly cheap.

However, upon taking a closer look at the used inventory and the financials, I noticed several 2019 LR units with around 50k miles that would cost about the same as a 2022 SR vehicle since new vehicles have thousands of dollars of fees tacked on. The older cars would also come with FSD which doesn’t really matter with current technologies. I’ve also learned that the 2019 version has adjustable lumbar support which is pretty important to me since I have a long work commute.

So for about the same price, if I go the old car route, I get basically immediate delivery, LR as opposed to SR, FSD, and better lumbar support, for 50k mileage, 3 years old, and less warranty. The physical improvements from 2019 to 2022 from what I’ve read are minor.

The EV rebates are negligible at this point. I’m in CA.

So all in all it sounds like the used car route is more lucrative. Is there anything I may be missing here?

Thanks in advance for weighing in.

(moderator note)

Welcome to TMC. I moved your post into this thread as it is one of the existing threads on this topic (although there are several others). Hopefully this thread will give you some feedback about the decision.
 
The newer M3 has a heated steering wheel, automatic trunk, heated charge port, heat pump (this is a big one), chrome delete (just preference), 2-ply laminated glass... and probably a few other things I've forgotten. LFP battery.

I believe the lumbar support was only removed from the *passenger* seat.

That 3 year old battery may have already seen a large chunk of it's degradation, so the range difference *may* be less than what you're expecting between it and the SR.

I'm biased, because I tend to prefer new over used... but you'd also lose a good chunk of the warranty.

FSD may or may not be useful to you. It's completely useless to me.

If it's in your budget, I'd thumbs up a new LR all day long. If it's between used LR 2019 and new SR, I'd have a harder time making that decision... but *probably* would go with the new SR.

Edit: the heated wheel on the new SR is a paid addon. You'd get the hardware... like $300 to enable the wheel plus heated rear seats. Being in L.A... perhaps none of the climate options (including heat pump) are of any value to you.
 
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Hiline

Member
Supporting Member
Apr 16, 2022
134
190
Los Angeles
The newer M3 has a heated steering wheel, automatic trunk, heated charge port, heat pump (this is a big one), chrome delete (just preference), 2-ply laminated glass... and probably a few other things I've forgotten. LFP battery.

I believe the lumbar support was only removed from the *passenger* seat.

That 3 year old battery may have already seen a large chunk of it's degradation, so the range difference *may* be less than what you're expecting between it and the SR.

I'm biased, because I tend to prefer new over used... but you'd also lose a good chunk of the warranty.

FSD may or may not be useful to you. It's completely useless to me.

If it's in your budget, I'd thumbs up a new LR all day long. If it's between used LR 2019 and new SR, I'd have a harder time making that decision... but *probably* would go with the new SR.

Edit: the heated wheel on the new SR is a paid addon. You'd get the hardware... like $300 to enable the wheel plus heated rear seats. Being in L.A... perhaps none of the climate options (including heat pump) are of any value to you.

Gotcha. Thank you for weighing in. Getting an LR new is too expensive for me after all those price hikes. So yeah, I am limited to the 2 options I posed. Since I live in LA, all the new heat-related features don’t matter. Battery degradation, from what I’ve read so far, is only around 5% after 50k miles so it’s minimal. So the clear advantage of getting a new SR is really just the longer warranty. How expensive is maintenance after warranty? How much do you think I should value an additional year of warranty?

Either way, the deals I saw suddenly vanished over Sunday so I don’t have to worry about them anymore haha. I may still check back to scout other deals. Even if the additional utility of the longer range is rarely impactful, waiting 5-6 months for a new car that I’m excited about is on the excessive side.
 

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