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Charging Station standards

Discussion in 'Supercharging & Charging Infrastructure' started by vfx, Jul 21, 2008.

  1. smorgasbord

    smorgasbord Active Member

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    From the comments in the article, here's a photo comparing the plugs:
    Chademo and SAE.jpg

    Someone should post a comparison with Tesla's plug.
     
  2. stopcrazypp

    stopcrazypp Well-Known Member

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  3. dpeilow

    dpeilow Moderator

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    Is that already a dual-mode rapid charger?
     
  4. Lloyd

    Lloyd Well-Known Member

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    Is there a Tesla Adapter in the works yet??
     
  5. VolkerP

    VolkerP EU Model S P-37

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    http://insideevs.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/SAE-Combo.jpg

    They are talking to DC quick charge a PHEV with 40 to 100kW, taking the SoC from 0-80% within 20-10 minutes. PHEV would be Plug-in Prius, GM Volt (16kWh), Fisker Karma (24kWh), etc.

    I think most PHEVs protect their battery from falling below 30% SoC anyway.
    Someone help me, what is the point of fast charging a PHEV?
     
  6. Dave EV

    Dave EV Active Member

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    Imagine you're on a road trip in a Volt and you do a fairly typical 400 miles with 2-3 stops. If you can fully charge during each of your 20 minute stops, instead of 38 EV miles during your trip, you get 114-150 EV miles. I'd certainly do it if it were available. Heck - I'd still L2 charge for 20-30 minutes even if that only gets me 4-6 miles.

    In a more typical situation with a shorter range PHEV like the Prius or CMAX, even running errands will quickly deplete your battery. Being able to top-up quickly could easily double or triple your EV range during these types of trips.

    Keep in mind that a "QC" with a PHEV doesn't even require all that much power compared to QC with the Tesla. To get a 30 minute charge with a Volt, you only need about 20 kW - this is just within the limits of J1772 L2 charging! With a Prius plugin, less than 10 kW - this is the stock charge rate of the Tesla! A C-MAX slightly more than the Prius - a bit more than 10 kW.
     
  7. VolkerP

    VolkerP EU Model S P-37

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    You would tie up a $10k DC QC station that is capable of delivering 40-100kW to charge with 10-20kW? It sure would boost the percentage of electric miles in your road trip, but that doesn't turn this into an economically viable business case. Sorry.
     
  8. Norbert

    Norbert TSLA will win

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    I don't think that's a fair comparison: due to the lens and perspective, the plug closer to the lens appears much larger.
     
  9. Dave EV

    Dave EV Active Member

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    The biggest cost of getting a QC station installed is getting the electrical supply nstalled. Look at the transformers that Tesla has had installed to go with their Supercharger stations. If you build a modular, flexible system like Tesla's where one stack of AC/DC chargers can charge multiple vehicles (installing additional plugs while you've got the crews out there is only a small incremental cost) while ensuring that total demand remains under the maximum load of the site, you can effectively make sure you are delivering the most amount of electricity possible. If you are charging for the service, inevitably you will want as many customers plugged in as possible as this will maximize revenue.

    This type of flexible/modular charging system has to be developed regardless to minimize wait at a busy station and Tesla is leading in this case by installing Supercharger stations with up to 6 plugs.

    Currently your typical QC station has only 1-2 plugs. With only 1 plug - you inevitably get stuck waiting for another car to finish. Blink has a 2-plug station - but it only charges one car at time - at least it automatically switches to the next car so that reduces time spent waiting for the other car to move out of the spot.

    Each Tesla 120kW Supercharger stack can charge at 2 cars simultaneously (or is it 3?) which minimizes waiting and maximizes utilization of the Supercharger stack. I imagine that this type of design could be fairly easily modified to handle basically as many plugs as desired - if all plugged in at the same time naturally the available power would be shared, but one could also easily imagine giving priority to customers willing to pay more - another way to increase revenue.
     

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