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Cruise control and autopilot slamming brakes when passing under blinking yellow lights on rural highway...

I have owned a new model 3 (with autopilot) for 3 weeks now. I have a long rural commute (60 miles each way), and I encounter blinking yellow lights over one of the highways twice along the route. The cruise control and autopilot both essentially *slam* the brakes as I approach the lights (both systems actually wait until I am probably within 30 feet of the lights--maybe less--before they slam the brakes).

Keep in mind that the posted speed limit on this highway is 75mph and most are usually doing 80+ mph! This obviously creates an extremely dangerous situation. The fact that this occurs with cruise control too is beyond ridiculous. I've noticed that when the flashing yellow lights are on the side of the road, the systems handle it appropriately and slow down slightly and more gradually. It is the situation where the lights are overhead (like a typical intersection traffic light) that the systems apparently think I am running a red light. Absolutely unacceptable that his is happening, and I am amazed someone hasn't been killed yet.
You do slow down, though, right? Yellow lights mean caution, and that means you slow down. I'd be surprised if it "slams on the brakes" (thank you for correct spelling!) if you slow down and "proceed with caution" as the DMV suggests.
 

EVNow

Well-Known Member
Sep 5, 2009
14,437
36,440
Seattle, WA
Not on Model 3's sold in North America.
Not anymore.

Tesla has been on a spree to de-content Model 3's to save money (HomeLink, auto-dimming mirror, standard 433Mhz TPMS, etc, now front radar).
You still get them on Model S's and X's. BTW, Model S is a much better long distance highway cruiser anyway.

a
Parts issues not for saving a few bucks. They keep increasing the price anyway and the margin is improving continuously.
 
The subject of traffic signals has been discussed here before. It would be great if colors of signals were standardized to a specific wavelength in nm but they still follow a standard based on a chromaticity diagram first published in 1931. You can read more about that here:


Standard stoplights are not hard to conceptualize and model. Except in rare instances, red is on the top, amber in the middle and green on the bottom. The sequencing is always the same. Red then green then amber and finally red again. Green arrows add to the complexity, but they generally apply to a specific travel lane, which is often defined in the map data. More recently, certain jurisdictions have added flashing amber arrows indicating an unprotected turn. Canada also has a flashing green light but it is becoming rare except in BC and Yukon. It indicates a pedestrian controlled crossing in those provinces.

But the flashing red-amber and red-red signals are the ones that cause issues with FSD. Their recognition by FSD seems to be a mix of mapping data and vision. A further complication is that standard signals may revert to flashing in times of low traffic density.

The first challenge in modeling flashing signals is the angle of the intersection, since the lighting on the cross street can often bleed through to a forward facing vehicle. This seems to be the main problem if the signal is not properly mapped. Of course, flashing signals just possess a repetitive on/off signal so there are no hints from sequencing like there is with a standard signal. Some flashing amber lights are not overhead and may alert the driver to a hazard like a tight curve or a school zone.

On the red flash street, there is no issues. It is no different that a two way stop sign. It's the amber flash side that's a problem. It means proceed with caution. The easiest solution for modeling is to completely ignore flashing amber lights. The problem is the bleed through mentioned above. Red and green are far apart in the light spectrum, but red and amber are not. This is why FSD presently does a hesitation dance at flashing ambers. It's amber, no wait it's red. Oh forget it, someone get me a cheeseburger. (apologies to Gary Larson). It's also possible that the signal is a full stoplight that is flashing amber during a low traffic period.

Anyway, that more than anyone wanted to know about this but not everything that could be said. I didn't even mention overhead lane signals for bridges and tunnels and other alternating traffic flow situations.
 
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drtimhill

Active Member
Apr 25, 2019
2,929
3,799
Seattle
The first challenge in modeling flashing signals is the angle of the intersection, since the lighting on the cross street can often bleed through to a forward facing vehicle.
Actually the first challenge for the car is to determine the that it is indeed flashing .. that takes a full on/off/on cycle at a minimum (off/on/off isnt enough), which, given the flash rate, is quite a bit of time, and depending on visibility and approach speed means the car may be quite close before it has determined its flashing.
 
You do slow down, though, right? Yellow lights mean caution, and that means you slow down. I'd be surprised if it "slams on the brakes" (thank you for correct spelling!) if you slow down and "proceed with caution" as the DMV suggests.
I knew someone would show up and tell me this is my fault.

The cruise control and autopilot are dangerous as they are currently configured. We are talking about a rural intersection with clear visibility from a mile away in all directions with a posted speed limit of 75mph. Even if I slow down to 65 mph from a quarter of a mile away, the system will still SLAM the brakes and start squealing red alert within 25 ft of the intersection.
 
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drtimhill

Active Member
Apr 25, 2019
2,929
3,799
Seattle
I knew someone would show up and tell me this is my fault.

The cruise control and autopilot are dangerous as they are currently configured. We are talking about a rural intersection with clear visibility from a mile away in all directions with a posted speed limit of 75mph. Even if I slow down to 65 mph from a quarter of a mile away, the system will still SLAM the brakes and start squealing red alert within 25 ft of the intersection.
Can you post some video? Always useful to understand others experiences and when/where this happens.
 

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