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Gen 3 Wall Charger - Can I get data from it?

IraSch

Member
Aug 7, 2020
36
17
New Jersey
I'm looking to try to get power usage data for my Model Y. In particular, KWh usage over time (how much electricity has the car used in a month, year, etc).

I can install a power monitor such as this one from Amazon:

AC 80-260V 100A CRS-022B LCD Display Digital Current Voltage Power Energy Frequency Power Factor Multimeter Ammeter Voltmeter with 100A Split Core Current Transformer

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B07K3S4K9L/ref=ppx_yo_dt_b_asin_title_o01_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

but I can't believe that the wall charger doesn't keep this data already. And since it has Wifi connectivity, maybe there's a way to get this data. Did I miss something along the way?

I did try a forum search but don't really have good keywords to search on.
 

STDRDC13

Member
Jul 15, 2017
203
485
The Woodlands, TX
I know you asked if the wall charger keeps the usage data...which i don't know, but the car can give you the info via the trip odometer. But it would require resetting it at the end of the month after the usage was recorded. But yeah, it would be cool if the wall charger data could be downloaded.
 

swaltner

Active Member
Oct 13, 2012
1,630
1,678
Kansas, USA
The trip meter is not accurate for total energy consumption. It measures power taken out of the battery when the vehicle is in gear, or at least on. It ignores the overhead for AC to DC conversion during charging, and power used while the car is parked (sentry mode, cabin overheat protection, pre-heating/cooling, ...)

I have an external TED 5000 (The Energy Detective) monitoring the power usage for my home charging. This is similar to the OP's referenced monitor on the first post, but the TED system is embedded in your breaker panel and then generates a web page for the user interface.

I don't use Tesla gear to charge my Model 3, so can't answer the question as to if this is built-in on the latest generation of wall connectors (the wi-fi version).
 

CDN-Build

Member
Aug 15, 2018
65
52
Cambridge
I bit the bullet and installed the power meter mentioned above.

The meter requires monitoring the voltage to determine wattage so 240V needs to be connected to the meter. I included 1/4 Amp fuses on each leg to be safe.

View media item 121725View media item 121728View media item 121726View media item 121727
Curious how this is working for you.
I also want to monitor the usage so I can tell how much power is used daily, weekly, monthly.
Does the unit you linked to Amazon in your initial thread work well for the above. ?
 

IraSch

Member
Aug 7, 2020
36
17
New Jersey
I've been very happy with it for what it does.

But to be clear, I purchased it from Amazon, it doesn't link to Amazon, Alexa, or anything. I manually read it and log the KWh usage and car mileage. It does include all power usage by the car including any overhead from power conversion that goes into charging the battery. KWh usage is cumulative from installation, but it can easily be reset to zero if you want to.
 
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CDN-Build

Member
Aug 15, 2018
65
52
Cambridge
It states it only measures one hot and one neutral. Since the charger uses two hots and no neutral, how did the hook up and monitoring work.
I’m not really familiar with this stuff, so I’m hoping you can help clarify for me.
Thanks
 

IraSch

Member
Aug 7, 2020
36
17
New Jersey
It states it only measures one hot and one neutral. Since the charger uses two hots and no neutral, how did the hook up and monitoring work.
I’m not really familiar with this stuff, so I’m hoping you can help clarify for me.

It only needs power to run the display and as a voltage reference to compute Watts/KW/KWh. It is rated up to 260V, so I connected it between the two hots. It didn't need a neutral. The current sensing coil goes around only 1 of the hot legs.

If you're not familiar with working with electrical power then any electrician should be able to connect this up for you.
 

kayak1

Member
Jan 21, 2020
176
116
USA, The great state of Maine
I have the following recording my solar production as well as the usage for the cars, heat and hot water:
It provides great data that one can see over time.
 

gnuarm

Model X 100 with 72 amp chargers
This is one of the many reasons I like the chargepoint wall charger over the Tesla. I sold my Tesla one on eBay. The chargepoint has an app.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B07WXZDHGV/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_8cUsFbW3MPYDK

You can buy a home energy monitor or that voltage sensor you posted should work ok.

Emporia Energy Smart Home Energy Monitor Devices.

Does the app let the EVSE talk directly to your phone/computer or does it have to go through a web server? They say the app can set charging times, can multiple times during the day be set? My ToU is peak in both morning and afternoon most of the year, then in four months it changes to one longer period in the afternoon. Will the app automatically adjust for this schedule? They also eliminate peak times on holidays, can it do that?

Holy crap! I just looked at the price, $1,528!!! Aren't these things usually around $500?
 

gnuarm

Model X 100 with 72 amp chargers
It states it only measures one hot and one neutral. Since the charger uses two hots and no neutral, how did the hook up and monitoring work.
I’m not really familiar with this stuff, so I’m hoping you can help clarify for me.
Thanks

The current flowing to the car is on both hot wires to complete the circuit. The current is the same in each wire, just the opposite direction. So you only need to measure one wire to get an accurate reading. The charger actually measures both wires for the safety circuit, but it's a subtractive measurement., Since the current in the two wires should be equal, if they are not equal to within a very few milliamps the power is cut.

The charger may measure the actual current flowing so it can report that, the normal operation of the charger does not require a current or power measurement. The charger tells the car the maximum current it can supply and the car has the responsibility of respecting that and not drawing more.
 
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CDN-Build

Member
Aug 15, 2018
65
52
Cambridge
It only needs power to run the display and as a voltage reference to compute Watts/KW/KWh. It is rated up to 260V, so I connected it between the two hots. It didn't need a neutral. The current sensing coil goes around only 1 of the hot legs.

If you're not familiar with working with electrical power then any electrician should be able to connect this up for you.
Thanks.
So I have a further question about the voltage reference.
So my charger runs off of 240 volts and a 50 amp breaker. I’m hooking this up to the panel.

So can this unit be wired into any two breakers, as long as one is X and one is Y, grabbing 240volts ?
Thanks
 

IraSch

Member
Aug 7, 2020
36
17
New Jersey
Thanks.
So I have a further question about the voltage reference.
So my charger runs off of 240 volts and a 50 amp breaker. I’m hooking this up to the panel.

So can this unit be wired into any two breakers, as long as one is X and one is Y, grabbing 240volts ?
Thanks
You need a dedicated 2-pole breaker. It will automatically grab both sides of the 240V supply. Do not attempt to use individual breakers. It would also not be a good idea to piggy-back off an existing 2-pole breaker such as an electric range.

If you're not familiar with working with electrical power then don't chance it. Mistakes in a panel and/or with 240V don't usually let you have a second chance.
 

gnuarm

Model X 100 with 72 amp chargers
Thanks.
So I have a further question about the voltage reference.
So my charger runs off of 240 volts and a 50 amp breaker. I’m hooking this up to the panel.

So can this unit be wired into any two breakers, as long as one is X and one is Y, grabbing 240volts ?
Thanks

What Ira said... The panel is made with a couple of strips running up and down with one side of the 240V on each rail. The breaker connects to one rail or the other for 120V. For 240V they have two breakers with a connection between the handles that connects one to each rail. To add a new circuit you need to add a new breaker.

Just in case you are not aware, a 50 amp circuit lets your car charge at 40 amps since such a use requires the current be derated to 80%. If you use a standard mobile cable with a 14-50 outlet it can be on either a 50 amp circuit or a 40 amp circuit, so the second generation cable that cars have come with for a number of years now will only charge at 32 amps. If you are installing a HPWC it can be set for the 50 amp capacity and allow 40 amp charging.

When I first got my car I wanted to get the fastest charging I could get thinking it was important... 72 amps. But I'm very good at procrastinating and put it off long enough that I think the HPWC they now sell won't supply that current. In the meantime I've come to realize my particular situation allow me to charge from a 120V level 1 outlet and do everything I want to do! Certainly that's not for everyone, only charging some 40 miles over night (depending on the length of the night ;). But pretty much any 240V charging will do the job for 99.9% of people/situations. Even a 3 Tesla family should be pretty happy with a single HPWC or NEMA 14-50 outlet, as long as they don't have any charger hogs. Keeping a Tesla charged is not that big of a deal. That said, never leave home without your charging cable. That's another story...
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,807
8,424
Boise, ID
I am also curious if I can get consumption data via the web interface of the Gen 3 Wall Connector?
Really? You added a new comment to this thread without apparently reading the previous comments that already explained that the wall connector doesn't have that capability?
 

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