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Lower Wh/M, 25k-30k on Tires, -and- Better Handling? Impossible.

Discussion in 'Model S' started by Edmond, Apr 25, 2016.

  1. Edmond

    Edmond Permanon

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    Seattle
    I'm reposting this here as the thread I originally posted it in would only be seen by the young sprogs present.

    And, much gratitude to lolachampcar for his research and development of this modification.

    [​IMG]

    This is called 'excessive camber'. Every Tesla made has excessive rear camber, of course not to this extreme, but almost always between -1.5 to -2.8 degrees. This is the reason for the excessive tire wear we see on good quality tires no matter how much we keep air and rotate.

    And an alignment from the SC is completely hit and miss, as if they don't know what they're doing.

    Rear camber is non-adjustable, so the upper link must be replaced with one that is adjustable. You need that link to be .21" longer so it will push the top of the tire out, to make it more square with the ground. (Specifically 1 degree in, which is optimal)
    [​IMG]
    BBC Speed & Machine (Note that newer cars have a ball-joint on one end, rather than both bushings)

    lolachampcar has extensive racing experience and has dialled in the very best alignment settings for our cars. (see threads in Dynamics) Tesla will not align it with a lowering kit or this upper link, so find an independent shop with an experienced hand on a laser aligner, give him these numbers, and pay their fee. Your tires will wear like they are supposed to, your Wh/mile will be lower by 10%-20%, and it'll be like riding on rails thereafter.

    Front:
    -0.70 Camber
    3.55 Caster
    -0.04 Toe

    Rear:
    -1.00 Camber
    0.15 Toe
     
    • Informative x 2
  2. scaesare

    scaesare Active Member

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    How well do these work with air suspension, which seems to cause the camber to vary with height?

    Also, price?
     
  3. demundus

    demundus Member

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    +1 for air suspension. I don't notice much wear or camber issues, but I'm all for interesting improvements where Tesla engineers may have fallen short :)
     
  4. Edmond

    Edmond Permanon

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    #4 Edmond, Apr 25, 2016
    Last edited: Apr 25, 2016
    I have air. Camber changes with the ride height, although it really shouldn't with modern suspensions.

    The lower you go, the more negative it gets, and it's already way too negative at normal height. Align at the height you drive at most often, and have him set it to -1.00 there. There's only so much you can do.

    Taking liberties with these settings will have all kinds of negative effects, like tracking every little crease in the road, drifting one way or the other, crabbing, and so on. lolachampcar has refined the settings to perfection for this car.

    BBC machines these out of hard billet aluminum alloy, specifically for our car, and puts the Tesla bushings in them. This is why it's expensive, and why they want your core. For a pair it's $1,000+core, unless you have the spherical bushings on -both- ends, in which case it's $800. Comes with the sensor attachment point.

    How much do you spend on a set of tires?
     
  5. Naonak

    Naonak Member

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    Arguably, how much improvement is there in tire wear with these versus without - it's not just how much you spend on tires alone. If you're only saying $10 per set, then it's going to have a long payback period. Of course, there may be other considerations beyond just money.
     

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