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self made aero wheels

Discussion in 'Model S: Driving Dynamics' started by David99, Jan 29, 2015.

  1. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    I did email them about moon disks for the Model S. They don't have anything. They said I would have to send it a rim from which they can make a mold that costs $700 (plus shipping the wheel back and forth). Then a moon disk for each wheel is $150.
     
  2. wycolo

    wycolo Active Member

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    > Drilled rims have reduced strength. How severely reduced is an open question. [Warped.One]

    Wrap your middle finger (you'll need the length) around one of the 19in spokes near its outer end. There is a LOT of meat there. So I'm drilling. Probably with self-tapping screws and only on ONE of the spoke pair. So 5 bolts per rim.

    I plan to cut hole (oval?) for pressure gauge & filler adapter (both to be straight-line type). So with luck only one on/off cycle per year per rim.
    --
     
  3. WarpedOne

    WarpedOne Supreme Premier

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    Determination abounds
    :)
     
  4. jerry33

    jerry33 (S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20

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    So basically we need a few folks to donate $50 or so to pay for the mold.
     
  5. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    I'm all for it. If we can get a few people together I'm in. I have a few extra wheels/rims so I can send them one without missing it on my car LOL Not sure how it will look in the end or how the attachment will work.
     
  6. wycolo

    wycolo Active Member

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    Those MOON DISCs appear to be a whole house of pain what with the Dzuz separate piece having to be welded on, or somehow attached to the rim. My pans have insufficient clearance (essentially none at all) so any pans for the Dzuz will have to stick out more. Then the Dzuz screw has a fixed length which limits your mounting options since spacing is critical to getting the Dzuz tesion perfect. With everyday screws you can set them to be just snug enough.

    I'd rather leave the pizza disc attached indefinitely, which of course requires a hole to: remove valve cap with tubing thingy, measure air pressure, insert filler adapter to add air, and then replace valve cap with tubing thingy. But with the MOONs you will also want to drill the valve stem hole anyway, since removing 12 Dzuz per week just to check tire pressure is going to get old real quick.

    Just some thoughts before I make my first move. :smile:
    --
     
  7. K5ING

    K5ING MegaMiler

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    How about using five quarter-turn quick release fasteners to attach the covers? There are tons of different styles out there. I might also be tempted to (spot)weld the receiving part onto the wheels instead of drilling into the rim to avoid compromising the rim strength.

    512795.jpg
     
  8. jerry33

    jerry33 (S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20

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    I didn't realize that the Moon disks didn't have a relatively easy to use attachment. For the tire inflation, I agree you need to be able to check it. There are two ways to go about this. One is to cut a hole--it would be annoying if the hole you cut whistled when the car was moving. Not saying it will, but it's something to check. The other way is to get a flexible extension and have only the end of the extension stick out. This is commonly done on truck tires. You could also locate the hole close to the centre of the wheel so that it wouldn't get knocked off by rubbing against a curb. It would also make checking pressure a breeze.
     
  9. Gizmotoy

    Gizmotoy Active Member

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    But it's not really about having "meat" there, is it? It's been awhile since I took my mechanical and materials engineering courses, I'm not either of those by trade, but is not the main concern creating a fracture point? That is, a weakness in the wheel that allows it to fail, no matter how much "meat" there is? You see it a lot with right angle joints, even huge beefy ones, or sharp edges because that corner creates enough stress to crack the material. Even doorways and such in your home.

    Wheels like to fail right at design transitions, and this would be not only creating one, but weakening the wheel at that point.

    Maybe I'm overly paranoid having witnessed two wheel failures in person (one led to the unfortunate destruction of a new Ferrari :( ), but be careful out there. I'd be tiptoeing around pretty lightly on those things afterwords.
     
  10. billarnett

    billarnett Member

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    All of this is kind of academic, isn't it, until we know if these wheel covers really improve efficiency?
     
  11. jerry33

    jerry33 (S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20

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    Tesla said their Aero wheels increased range by 5%. It's hard to see how a cover like this could do any worse. (and those Areo wheels are heavy, I lifted one at a Service Centre).
     
  12. Matias

    Matias Active Member

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  13. 1208

    1208 Active Member

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    No ones tried to cover the whole of the rear wheels?

    Wonder what the efficiency comparison would be between the aero wheels and covered ones...

    3-volkswagen-xl1.jpg
     
  14. jerry33

    jerry33 (S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20

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    I don't doubt that fully covered wheels would be better, perhaps as much as 3%. The problem is the fender skirt. These are traditionally very hard to take on and off, especially in adverse conditions. As far as I know, only Citroen ID/DS did it right. (The whole quarter panel was removable with just one easy to reach bolt.)
     
  15. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    I had an idea for attaching the pans without drilling the rims, drill and tap the tops of the lug nuts.
     
  16. WarpedOne

    WarpedOne Supreme Premier

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    Drilling the lug nuts is even worse idea than drilling the rims.
    What is this obsession with discs flying off?

    There is perfectly good mounting option demonstrated here:
    wheel2.jpg

    If those plastic bands seem as not strong enough, use stronger ones or even metal.
     
  17. jerry33

    jerry33 (S85-3/2/13 traded in) X LR: F2611##-3/27/20

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    I don't believe there is a strength problem with the plastic, but I can see a problem with lining them up and keeping them lined up. Also the disks need to be snug against the wheels so that they don't rattle.

    What I'd like to see is a compression device that uses the centre bore of the wheel and has a lever to snug the disk up. This would keep the wheel integrity, not have a problem with lining up the holes in the disk, other than the valve stem hole, and keep most of the mass at the centre of rotation so that balance won't be a problem.
     
  18. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    I'd like to hear the logic on that one. Traditionally lug nuts have been "drilled" completely through, like most nuts.

    lugnuts.jpg

    I'm suggesting a much smaller hole. Pretty sure it's not going to be an issue, plus it's easier to replace lug nuts than rims.
     
  19. WarpedOne

    WarpedOne Supreme Premier

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    Tesla uses "whole head" screws. Drilling holes into those heads will definitely reduce their strenght and might cause dramatic failure - wheel falling of.

    I don't see how would one use drilled lug nuts from your picture?
     
  20. JRP3

    JRP3 Hyperactive Member

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    You wouldn't. My point is that obviously a large hole in the end of a lug nut does not weaken it. A much smaller hole, drilled in the end of the solid head nuts that Tesla uses should not impact the nut integrity. The solid head nut is just for looks, not strength.
     

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