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Significant ride comfort in MYP Performance with 19" Gemini wheels/ higher profile tires

Pianewman

2021 MYLR VIN 88,XXX, Rd/Wh, 12/20 delivery
Oct 28, 2020
1,707
1,239
Fort Worth
TheLex: The harshest I ever owned was a boosted 1993 Audi S4 with Bilsteins. I agree that the ride carried the expectation of possible harshness.

I've GOTTEN older (forget the "getting older!) I purchased the MPP coilovers, have them set very close to the softest compression. I'm very pleased with the control they have given the otherwise harsh and bounding OEM ride. (DFW aged conrete slabs) I'd like to try the Ohlins setup as yet another step-up in comfort, but not gonna spend the money.

Lexus ride? Nope. Not gonna happen.
 
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glide

Active Member
Jun 6, 2018
4,186
5,865
USA
For the MY LR what tire would be good to go significantly up from "very very harsh"?
What do you mean by “significantly up from”?

If you are asking which set of 19” tires will improve ride quality, there really aren’t any. The 19’s are a mild improvement over the 21’s.

The core issue is the suspension. If you want a smoother ride, start there.
 

TheLex

Member
Oct 29, 2014
46
34
NorCal
TheLex: The harshest I ever owned was a boosted 1993 Audi S4 with Bilsteins. I agree that the ride carried the expectation of possible harshness.

I've GOTTEN older (forget the "getting older!) I purchased the MPP coilovers, have them set very close to the softest compression. I'm very pleased with the control they have given the otherwise harsh and bounding OEM ride. (DFW aged conrete slabs) I'd like to try the Ohlins setup as yet another step-up in comfort, but not gonna spend the money.

Lexus ride? Nope. Not gonna happen.
The MPP coilovers look like a great system. And yes, I still find that the ride with the 19" wheels isn't all that great. However, above and beyond the cost of buying and installing coilovers, I'm loathe to giving Tesla and out when it comes to warrantying the vehicle. People like to quote Magnussen Moss Act but the reality is if a manufacturer wants to deny coverage, you're SOL even with an attorney on your side. You have to go hire a $500/hr attorney while the manufacturer has a fleet of them on retainer. They're not going to ever give in because it would set a precedent. There's a guy on the BMW forums with an M5 that tried to quote MM Act and hired an attorney. He spent thousands on fees only to give up in the end because he couldn't use his car in the meanwhile and BMW was content to run the clock and make him spend ever more money on his attorney. But I digress. With a vehicle like the MY, I'm going to probably limit my mods to changing the oem tires to a softer riding set after the oems wear out.
 

RoBoRaT

Zero Farts Given!
Nov 22, 2018
1,557
1,404
NorthSoCal
Great to see many comments about how MYP ride harshness is sometime blown out of proportion👍.

Due to lowered suspension, what is the height difference between a MYP and LR in stock form?
No measurements but you get the idea.

P 19"s vs LR 20"s on stock suspension/tires.

BTW, without blowing the difference in suspension out of wack, there is a difference - by how much, is subjective.
20211009_112556.jpg
20211020_210728.jpg
20211009_112518.jpg
 

tangible1

Member
Jul 8, 2021
521
442
SoCAL
While I would love to have the improved acceleration, low ride height, better brakes etc with MYP, concerned with the ride quality and increased chances of 21" Uberturbine wheels causing problems with the roads around here.

Guess many people sell their 21" wheels and move to 19" Gemini, 20" induction wheels or aftermarket wheels with some higher profile /sidewall tires for increased ride comfort?

Purely from improving ride quality, if I swap out the 21" wheels with stock 19" Gemini wheels and tires, will it improve the ride quality somewhat closer to that of a LR? What else is the recommended approach without spending a ton money? Thanks!! Appreciate everyone inputs
My thinking:
Well, how much will a set of Gemini's and new tires cost, vs how much will suspension improvement cost?
About 2500 bucks for wheel/tires/mount/balance/tax. Ok, you can offset some of that with your current wheels/tires.
If you fix the suspension to your liking, you can run any wheel/tire. Range 2200-3750 bucks, plus 500 install (roughly).

Yes, 19" wheel/tire will add sidewall, provide some reduced spring rate (from the larger sidewall), and some overall improvement. Maybe. Depends on you.
And it will NOT change the dampers (shocks), which are responsible for smoothing out the bumps/bounces/pavement irregularities.

Just my 2cents.
 

tangible1

Member
Jul 8, 2021
521
442
SoCAL
Perspective: My prior two cars were a 2013 Subaru STI and a 2016 BMW M3 on the base 18" wheels. The MYP rides like a dream on the 21" Uberturbines.
It's interesting to consider that the heavier wheel/tire combo might deliver a better ride than the lighter ones.
The MYP is only lowered 20mm, there's no damper difference with MYLR, they're the same. Don't know if it's a shorter or a different value spring on the MYP. BOTH?

In addition, there's a comment on a thread here that reports the MYLR ride improves greatly with ~120lbs more weigh in the car. Much like my truck does.

Either way, it suggests the stock spring/damper setup needs tuning.
 

smithrukami

Member
May 8, 2019
144
24
irvine
My thinking:
Well, how much will a set of Gemini's and new tires cost, vs how much will suspension improvement cost?
About 2500 bucks for wheel/tires/mount/balance/tax. Ok, you can offset some of that with your current wheels/tires.
If you fix the suspension to your liking, you can run any wheel/tire. Range 2200-3750 bucks, plus 500 install (roughly).

Yes, 19" wheel/tire will add sidewall, provide some reduced spring rate (from the larger sidewall), and some overall improvement. Maybe. Depends on you.
And it will NOT change the dampers (shocks), which are responsible for smoothing out the bumps/bounces/pavement irregularities.

Just my 2cents.
What suspension package do you recommend or know of?
 

tangible1

Member
Jul 8, 2021
521
442
SoCAL
The trade off on a soft ride is a bouncy ride. The OEM set up is great for 25% of the time but if you drive the freeway on a daily basis you basically want a soft ride
I would characterize the ride you might want as 'controlled'.
Not too bouncey, not too jarring, more or less absorbing the punches and smoothing out, stabilizing the chassis.
However, this may not be a description that suits you.
Your experience with various cars and understanding of what their suspensions are about has a great bearing on your perception.
Suspension is very subjective.

IMHO, the spring / damper combo in the MYLR allows too much bounce and doesn't isolate the chassis from much.
In contrast, the MYP has shorter stiffer springs, and the dampers work better with that reduced spring travel. But it still ain't all that.
In both cases, handling suffers from the suspension setup as well.
But I spent 10 years racing Porsche 911's and learned a little bit along the way. YMMV

There are currently 3 vendors of aftermarket suspension kits for Tesla vehicles, and a 4th that does air-ride kits (for $$$$$).
Also there are 'spring-only' kits which mostly just do some lowering but don't do much for ride quality.

Vendors in order of cost: Unplugged Performance, Mountain Pass Performance, Redwood Motorsports.
You can find several threads on the TMC site here discussing these, as well as find their websites.
There's a lot to learn before plunging in, and suspension is as much art as science, so do some homework, beg some test rides, pick your poison.
 
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smithrukami

Member
May 8, 2019
144
24
irvine
I would characterize the ride you might want as 'controlled'.
Not too bouncey, not too jarring, more or less absorbing the punches and smoothing out, stabilizing the chassis.
However, this may not be a description that suits you.
Your experience with various cars and understanding of what their suspensions are about has a great bearing on your perception.
Suspension is very subjective.

IMHO, the spring / damper combo in the MYLR allows too much bounce and doesn't isolate the chassis from much.
In contrast, the MYP has shorter stiffer springs, and the dampers work better with that reduced spring travel. But it still ain't all that.
In both cases, handling suffers from the suspension setup as well.
But I spent 10 years racing Porsche 911's and learned a little bit along the way. YMMV

There are currently 3 vendors of aftermarket suspension kits for Tesla vehicles, and a 4th that does air-ride kits (for $$$$$).
Also there are 'spring-only' kits which mostly just do some lowering but don't do much for ride quality.

Vendors in order of cost: Unplugged Performance, Mountain Pass Performance, Redwood Motorsports.
You can find several threads on the TMC site here discussing these, as well as find their websites.
There's a lot to learn before plunging in, and suspension is as much art as science, so do some homework, beg some test rides, pick your poison.
Thx. I’ve learned thru buying and selling Ys that they tend to be like iPhones- they’re always getting better and not much value holding onto them so investing money in them never comes out. That said I agree with your assessment. Avoid both jarring and bouncy. I think 19 or 20 are max to use without air suspension on Y. I’ve had MYP and 20% of time it’s thrill. But 70% it’s too jarring as commuter car.
 

smithrukami

Member
May 8, 2019
144
24
irvine
I would characterize the ride you might want as 'controlled'.
Not too bouncey, not too jarring, more or less absorbing the punches and smoothing out, stabilizing the chassis.
However, this may not be a description that suits you.
Your experience with various cars and understanding of what their suspensions are about has a great bearing on your perception.
Suspension is very subjective.

IMHO, the spring / damper combo in the MYLR allows too much bounce and doesn't isolate the chassis from much.
In contrast, the MYP has shorter stiffer springs, and the dampers work better with that reduced spring travel. But it still ain't all that.
In both cases, handling suffers from the suspension setup as well.
But I spent 10 years racing Porsche 911's and learned a little bit along the way. YMMV

There are currently 3 vendors of aftermarket suspension kits for Tesla vehicles, and a 4th that does air-ride kits (for $$$$$).
Also there are 'spring-only' kits which mostly just do some lowering but don't do much for ride quality.

Vendors in order of cost: Unplugged Performance, Mountain Pass Performance, Redwood Motorsports.
You can find several threads on the TMC site here discussing these, as well as find their websites.
There's a lot to learn before plunging in, and suspension is as much art as science, so do some homework, beg some test rides, pick your poison.
I just learned PSI can decrease according to tire size bringing more supple ride.
 

tangible1

Member
Jul 8, 2021
521
442
SoCAL
I just learned PSI can decrease according to tire size bringing more supple ride.
While tire pressure can matter, it's not the major effect some may claim.
Further, the Tesla OEM tires have foam cores and standard tires do not (unless you pay extra for same/same).
In addition, people have posted of ride improvements going with both higher and lower tire pressures.

Bottom line: it's the dampers and springs that determine the ride qualities.

However, it's subjective, and people's reactions are dependent on prior vehicle experiences.
No one gets an introduction to suspension design during Driver Education.
 

tangible1

Member
Jul 8, 2021
521
442
SoCAL
Thx. I’ve learned thru buying and selling Ys that they tend to be like iPhones- they’re always getting better and not much value holding onto them so investing money in them never comes out. That said I agree with your assessment. Avoid both jarring and bouncy. I think 19 or 20 are max to use without air suspension on Y. I’ve had MYP and 20% of time it’s thrill. But 70% it’s too jarring as commuter car.
A very good point on the limits to spending on ancillary car parts.
 

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