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Supercharger - Livermore, CA (LIVE 21 Nov 2018, 20 urban stalls)

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Might be a function of battery size. My X 75 was around 32 Kw at 85%. Had car set for 93%

Mine is an 85Kw battery and I have it set to 95% (just as a safeguard in case I don't make it back to the car before it hits 90% - which is what I usually charge to). I'm going to try the Dublin SC next time to see if there is any difference (or how much difference there is).
 
Mine is an 85Kw battery and I have it set to 95% (just as a safeguard in case I don't make it back to the car before it hits 90% - which is what I usually charge to). I'm going to try the Dublin SC next time to see if there is any difference (or how much difference there is).

There should be a difference, The full superchargers at the Dublin SC are rated higher.

But also remember it has been colder lately. I was at the Dublin SC early yesterday. Only one other car charging. I came in at 40%, but only drove 6 miles from my garage to get there so the battery was cold. My car would only charge at 70-80 MPH until the battery was warmed up. Then it slowly crept up to the normal charging rate of 200+ mph. I think it took 20 + minutes to get to full rate.
 
Thanks for the insight. I went to Dublin SC this morning to test it out. It makes sense that the battery would charge slower when it is cold. The odd thing for me is that it started at a high rate (went up to 230MPH pretty quickly), then gradually dropped. It was probably at 140MPH for most of the time but by the end when I got close to 80%, it was down to 94MPH.
 
Thanks for the insight. I went to Dublin SC this morning to test it out. It makes sense that the battery would charge slower when it is cold. The odd thing for me is that it started at a high rate (went up to 230MPH pretty quickly), then gradually dropped. It was probably at 140MPH for most of the time but by the end when I got close to 80%, it was down to 94MPH.

This is getting off-topic, but when the car reports the charging speed in miles-per-hour, it's actually an average over your entire charging session. So it's not a very good way to compare the power you're actually getting at any moment in time. The power as displayed in kWh is actually an instantaneous point measurement and reflects how much power your car is drawing at the time it's displayed. That's more useful for these types of discussions.

Bruce.
 
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Actually I noticed they changed that on a recent software update. I'm sure not every Tesla has received that update though.

Even if it changed so that the "MPH" charge rate is instantaneous instead of average, it's still not useful, because the mi/Wh rating is different for different models and trim levels. 100 MPH charge rate on a Model X is different (power-wise) from 100 MPH charge rate on a Model 3. Also different between RWD vs AWD vs various battery capacities. The most useful number when talking about charge rate in a technical sense is just straight power (kW).
 
I can see the Porsche crowd taking a promotional picture with 10 Taycans charging here at 350 kw.
No you can't. Only 1 or 2 of the 10 chargers there are "capable" of 350 kW. The others max out at 150 kW. Which if they can get all of them charging at that rate simultaneously is perfectly respectable. But even if the 350 kW chargers can both put out full power and the cars can take it, the most you'll possibly see getting it at one time is 2 cars.
 
Even if it changed so that the "MPH" charge rate is instantaneous instead of average, it's still not useful, because the mi/Wh rating is different for different models and trim levels. 100 MPH charge rate on a Model X is different (power-wise) from 100 MPH charge rate on a Model 3. Also different between RWD vs AWD vs various battery capacities. The most useful number when talking about charge rate in a technical sense is just straight power (kW).
No disagreement there.
 
Thanks for the insight. I went to Dublin SC this morning to test it out. It makes sense that the battery would charge slower when it is cold. The odd thing for me is that it started at a high rate (went up to 230MPH pretty quickly), then gradually dropped. It was probably at 140MPH for most of the time but by the end when I got close to 80%, it was down to 94MPH.

After 80% or so they start to slow. The idea is to prevent overcharging and generating too much heat from the charging process. Batteries perform best in a relatively narrow heat range.
 
All...please don’t be the person below...just because you have a Tesla doesn’t mean you get to park in a supercharger slot without hooking up....I’ve seen several cars do this at the outlet mall.
 

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There was a discussion on one of our local Facebook groups last night where a couple of people reported the outlet mall closing on Christmas Day, and also coning off access to the parking lots, including the Superchargers. The speculation was that mall management did this to prevent camping out before the after-Christmas sales. It’s now the day after Christmas, so presumably this is a moot point, but something to keep in mind for the future.

Bruce.
 
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Picked up 10 minutes of charge at Livermore today. Nav said there were 4 of 20 available and it was, surprisingly, exactly correct for once. I had expected the 4 open stalls to be ICE'd, but they weren't. The ICE drivers were parking all the way across the street at the overflow parking like they were supposed to. I saw several go down the row but see the "Telsa only" signs and move on. A bit off-topic but I found it interesting that all of the Electrify America stalls were "EV'd" or "hybid'ed". Not a single vehicle was plugged in. There were two non-plug in Prius hybrids, a Leaf (but not in the CHADEMO stall), a Ford Fusion, and a couple of others. From what I have seen not one of these vehicles could have plugged into the CC2 type 2 connectors on the 150 kW or 350 kW chargers there. Were they just trying to block the Chevy Bolts that could have plugged in? I guess at least they weren't ICE, but they did block them and those cars could not have used them anyway.
 
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Went by today, and was the only Tesla charging. Only receiving 35kw. When the next Tesla arrived, same with his car. Thought these urban chargers were to charge at ~ 70 kw. Happy to have Livermore chargers. Would love to have 120kw supercharger, or the V3 charging.
 
Went by today, and was the only Tesla charging. Only receiving 35kw. When the next Tesla arrived, same with his car. Thought these urban chargers were to charge at ~ 70 kw. Happy to have Livermore chargers. Would love to have 120kw supercharger, or the V3 charging.

When evaluating the perceived slowness of Superchargers, it's important to consider a number of factors, such as what model of car, state of charge of the battery (charging is slower as the battery gets more full), pairing (shouldn't be an issue with urban superchargers), outside temperature, and whether the battery is cold-soaked or not (charging a cold battery will take longer). All of these affect the rate at which a car will draw power from a Supercharger, sometimes in non-intuitive ways.

Bruce.
 
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Went by today, and was the only Tesla charging. Only receiving 35kw. When the next Tesla arrived, same with his car. Thought these urban chargers were to charge at ~ 70 kw. Happy to have Livermore chargers. Would love to have 120kw supercharger, or the V3 charging.
Without telling us your SOC at the start of your charging session, air temperature, your pack size, when your car was built, and how far you drove before starting charging (which effects your battery temperature) it is impossible to comment in a useful way as to whether your observed charge rate was abnormal or not.
 
Went by today, and was the only Tesla charging. Only receiving 35kw. When the next Tesla arrived, same with his car. Thought these urban chargers were to charge at ~ 70 kw. Happy to have Livermore chargers. Would love to have 120kw supercharger, or the V3 charging.

As Bruce mentioned, there are a lot of factors that go into your charge rate. The biggest correlation to charge rate i've seen it SOC. I have often gotten 70kW when I first plug in, but it gradually slows down after that. I've heard temperature also impacts it, but i'm still gather data see if I can find a correlation.

For example, I went for a quick charge cause my battery was low (20%) and it pulled nearly 20kWh in 20 minutes. Normally I start charge at 35-40% and charge to 80% which is on average 35kWh and takes about 50 minutes. (I have an 85kWh battery). As you may have read/heard, it pulls more charge when you battery is lower and then slows down as it fills up.