Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Driving Range less than expected with new MY-LR

Dennisis

Active Member
Supporting Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,016
1,016
Tucson
Similar thread here.
Here's my response.
Wow, I’m running 267 over 20k and did 250 something with my m3 before.
 
  • Like
Reactions: mangrove79
Over the "winter" here in FL my wife with her daily driving was easily hitting the EPA wh/mi and regularly exceeding it. Now that it's into the 90s almost every day with the AC working much harder we're seeing 300+ wh/mi on the same drives. Every time you stop and get out for any period of time the AC has to cool the car down 60-70 degrees when you get back in and work that much harder to maintain a reasonable temperature. She is also a big fan of setting the climate control to active when going into the store or other errands. This is a big advantage of an EV so why the heck would she not use it to make her life more comfortable/enjoyable?

We still only have to plug in and charge to 80% every three days normally. When we can recoup daily driving battery usage at home before we even go to bed then wh/mi is really the last thing on our minds.
 
EV charging stations are still not ubiquitous like gas stations
Funny you say this because it is obviously 100% true but we have about 5,000 miles of road tripping since picking up our MYLR last November and we have past more superchargers than we have stopped at by a lot. I guess double that number if you throw EA in there. Our range anxiety was squashed the moment we started flying past chargers lol.
 

Ron J.

MY LR, Blue-Bk, OD 9/30/21 - Delivered 5/26/22
Nov 20, 2021
309
352
Fort Myers, FL
Your situation is literally identical to mine a year ago. My delivery was 5/31/21, the beginning of summer. Many of my trips that involve I-75 would get me 300 wh/mi or above, and pure local trips would be around 260. The heat is the big killer of battery power, but rain as well. Your efficiency will decrease, and consumption increase by 10% easily in FL rain storm.

What you'll find welcome is that in 5 months your efficiency will improve A LOT. My winter efficiency here in SW FL is just crazy good. It has come down to 252 wh/mi from my summer numbers in the 280s. 60-70 degrees, no wind, no rain will do wonders on your number. I think my average from Nov-May is somewhere around 225, and it's 50-50 highway/local for me. Admittedly I am a hypermiler, so YMMV.
Thanks for the inputs, from a fellow SW FL resident. BTY do you know Larry Chanin (Sarasota resident and former founder/President of the Florida Tesla
Enthusiasts Club)?
 

ucmndd

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2016
9,107
17,667
California
I got slightly better than the rated range in very real world conditions. there's not much more to say than that.

I have no idea what the elevation change is - there are some hills but it's a relatively flat trip. Likewise I don't know the winds since I was in the car. there was a light breeze when I left and a light breeze when I got home. If you looked at my signature, you'll also note that I live in Minneapolis meaning that average includes driving in 2 Minnesota winters - extreme cold, snow, etc, conditions which drastically affect the efficiency of any car. There are also many times I've floored it to merge into traffic, make a turn in traffic, etc (and a few times when I was having fun). Those all add into my final efficiency number.

You asserted that achieving the stated range was impossible to achieve. I just gave you concrete proof that it's not. You can keep digging a hole, but facts are facts. We also have a Honda Odyssey but virtually never get the EPA rated fuel economy in it, either. Do you care to go on a tirade about that, too?

The fact is, the range is achievable but like every other car on the road, there are a myriad of factors that affect efficiency so most people's real world efficiency is lower. That doesn't make Tesla's number a lie, it just means it may not be accurate for you, just like every other EPA estimate on the car lot.
I sometimes forget how pedantic you have to be around here given peoples’ defensiveness and need for confirmation bias.

Yes, I too can come up with a trip that meets or exceeds EPA range. Hell, there’s a 40 mile trip I can take that terminates at my home and uses less than 50 wh/mi. Sure, there’s 4500 feet of elevation decline, but hey, it’s possible to exceed EPA range!

Refining my statement for the pedants: it is essentially impossible to get EPA rated range in any modern Tesla over any significant period of time and variable driving conditions, specifically as compared to other EVs. This is deliberate and by design as Tesla has learned to aggressively game the EPA cycle and decided that advertising big numbers is more important than actually delivering them.

That doesn’t make the number a “lie” - they’re clearly following the letter of the law if not the spirit of it. However it does make them an outlier and wrecks the ability to conduct relative comparisons, which is what EPA ratings SHOULD enable. Given identical conditions, a Tesla will nearly always use more rated range miles to cover a given distance than pretty much any other EV on the market.
 
You will not get EPA rated range in any modern Tesla in any real world conditions.

There’s really not much more to say than that.

I sometimes forget how pedantic you have to be around here given peoples’ defensiveness and need for confirmation bias....
it is essentially impossible to get EPA rated range in any modern Tesla over any significant period of time and variable driving conditions, specifically as compared to other EVs.
Umm, yeah. I guess I'm being pedantic, but there's a significant difference between those two statements. Sorry if I pissed you off by answering what you wrote the first time, but if you can't write what you mean then don't expect people to answer what you meant. Actually, I take that back, I'm not being pedantic. You wrote a very black and white statement that was false and I showed you it was false.
Yes, I too can come up with a trip that meets or exceeds EPA range. Hell, there’s a 40 mile trip I can take that terminates at my home and uses less than 50 wh/mi. Sure, there’s 4500 feet of elevation decline, but hey, it’s possible to exceed EPA range!

150 miles is not a significant enough period of time? (FYI - I looked up the elevation change for my trip. It was just under 300 feet over 150 miles)This was about as real world as you can get - I hopped in my car and drove it home from the cabin. Northern Wisconsin to Minneapolis. Real traffic, real weather, real driving.

I don't disagree that the EPA should have more consistent guidelines for the ratings but quite honestly, as long as they're playing by the rules the EPA sets forth the fault lies with the EPA, not Tesla.
 
Thanks for the inputs, from a fellow SW FL resident. BTY do you know Larry Chanin (Sarasota resident and former founder/President of the Florida Tesla
Enthusiasts Club)?
No, I don't. But thanks for the info, I'll look up the club here.

BTW, one way to improve your summer numbers is to tint your windows AND get good sunshades for windshield/roof, if you haven't already. If you don't mind the stiff suspension, you can also increase your tire pressure. I keep mine at 42 cold. The last (extreme) thing you can do is turn off Cabin Overheat Protection if your car is always garaged, but again that's too extreme for me.
 
It is indeed possible to get the EPA range in real world driving conditions. It does require effort, though. Below is a screenshot of my 'Trips' page. Over 25,000 miles I have averaged 242 Whr/m, and that includes the recent high speed (speed limit + 5 to 7 mph) round trip to San Diego (with extensive AC use) as well as other not so recent long distance trips. Keep your Tesla in Chill Acceleration mode and drive gently (doesn't mean drive slow, necessarily, just avoiding rapid acceleration and anticipating traffic lights or other slowdowns ahead). The less you use your brakes, the lower your Whr/mi will be.

IMG_4360.jpeg
 

Dennisis

Active Member
Supporting Member
Feb 11, 2020
1,016
1,016
Tucson
No, I don't. But thanks for the info, I'll look up the club here.

BTW, one way to improve your summer numbers is to tint your windows AND get good sunshades for windshield/roof, if you haven't already. If you don't mind the stiff suspension, you can also increase your tire pressure. I keep mine at 42 cold. The last (extreme) thing you can do is turn off Cabin Overheat Protection if your car is always garaged, but again that's too extreme for me.
Just turn off the AC on the overheat protection, not the fan. And use your phone app to cool your car for a few before getting in.
 
It is indeed possible to get the EPA range in real world driving conditions. It does require effort, though. Below is a screenshot of my 'Trips' page. Over 25,000 miles I have averaged 242 Whr/m, and that includes the recent high speed (speed limit + 5 to 7 mph) round trip to San Diego (with extensive AC use) as well as other not so recent long distance trips. Keep your Tesla in Chill Acceleration mode and drive gently (doesn't mean drive slow, necessarily, just avoiding rapid acceleration and anticipating traffic lights or other slowdowns ahead). The less you use your brakes, the lower your Whr/mi will be.

View attachment 816452
Wow, 6K mile trip to SD, impressive. You must have been in the low 230s before the trip. That's crazy considering NC winter gets pretty cold.
 
It is indeed possible to get the EPA range in real world driving conditions. It does require effort, though. Below is a screenshot of my 'Trips' page. Over 25,000 miles I have averaged 242 Whr/m, and that includes the recent high speed (speed limit + 5 to 7 mph) round trip to San Diego (with extensive AC use) as well as other not so recent long distance trips. Keep your Tesla in Chill Acceleration mode and drive gently (doesn't mean drive slow, necessarily, just avoiding rapid acceleration and anticipating traffic lights or other slowdowns ahead). The less you use your brakes, the lower your Whr/mi will be.

View attachment 816452
No, you're clearly making it up. It's impossible to get that kind of range in real world driving. Impossible, I tell you! An the acceleration doesn't matter. It's elementary physics. you can stomp on the accelerator and it won't make any difference! /s

@ZenRockGarden

Nice stats - and a great example for others. Lo and behold, many of the principles that apply to ICE cars also apply to EVs - conservative driving is easier on the car and easier on the pocketbook.
 
At 70 mph a lot of the energy is used in pushing air out of the way. As far as A/C goes, I parked my S on a hot asphalt parking lot all day waiting for an eclipse. running the A/C set to 72 degrees F gave my daughter a cool place to feed her baby. I lost about 8 miles of range for each hour I ran the A/C. That was a lot less than I’d expected.

If you turn on the A/C in a hot car, there will be additional power consumption as the interior is cooled to the set temperature. That means you won’t want to take the energy consumption data from the first few miles of a trip. It’s the same in winter with running the heat, that largely increases displayed energy consumption, especially with short trips.

Since air is a fluid, air resistance goes up as the square of the velocity. That’s for laminar flow. But the car would be silent (almost) if the air flow was laminar. You have wind noise, that’s an indication of turbulent air flow and for turbulent flow the air resistance goes way up with increasing velocity.

There’s also some drag from your tires. All that tire noise is energy use. If you have the performance option with the larger wheels, there will be enough additional rolling resistance that Tesla calculates a different maximum range for the vehicle based on that alone.

Anyway the most effective thing you can do to increase range is to slow down, that and keep the tires inflated to the maximum allowed.

Other things that will affect your power consumption are hills, winds, altitude, and air temperature. You might think not running the A/C and keeping the windows open would be good. It isn’t, at highway speeds open windows increase drag to use far more energy than the A/C consumes, so opening windows actually increases power use.

The displayed range is more for comparison than anything else, it allows you to compare one car configuration to another. How much range you actually get depends a lot on your driving.

Range isn’t really all that important anyway. No one drives until the battery is completely exhausted. Most of us don’t charge above 80-90 percent of capacity to preserve our long term battery health. So you are now looking at using something around 60-70% of the published available range, not always using that full published mileage range.

Enjoy the car, it’s amazing. Try not to worry too much about range and power consumption unless you really need to. Now if this range thing is a real bugaboo for you, try fully inflating the tires, shut off everything that uses additional power, reduce the weight to a minimum, pick a windless day, and drive on flat ground at 45 mph for an hour or so. That will tell you how much power the car actually uses to push itself along. It won’t help you, though, since none of us drive that way. Still bugaboos sometimes need to be squashed.

Best,
David
 
No, you're clearly making it up. It's impossible to get that kind of range in real world driving. Impossible, I tell you! An the acceleration doesn't matter. It's elementary physics. you can stomp on the accelerator and it won't make any difference! /s

@ZenRockGarden

Nice stats - and a great example for others. Lo and behold, many of the principles that apply to ICE cars also apply to EVs - conservative driving is easier on the car and easier on the pocketbook.
Additionally, one cannot apply elementary physics in all situations. If one stands outside, arms outstretched, with a bucket of sand held in each hand, and you keep the buckets level, elementary physics tells us you are doing no work at all. Elementary physics forces us to ignore a lot. Wind resistance, friction, tire drag, turbulent air flow, boundary layers, and any number of other factors.
 
  • Like
Reactions: sleepydoc
@SkyDog let me guess, you don't use the HVAC very often.
I use the HVAC like I always did with any other car. I got the MY in February so I definitely used the heat a lot. There have only been a few really hot days here so I haven't used the AC much yet - I like to keep the windows open when on smaller 45 mph country roads, which is the majority of my driving.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: jcanoe

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top