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Firsthand comparison from an owner of both, between the Rivian SUV and Tesla Model X. The only EV 7-seater SUV's available.

JER85

Member
Jul 13, 2021
819
2,365
NJ
Damn the Rivians look like they are amazing vehicles with some really cool little quirks and features... Very well built too.... But I just can't get pas the look... The SUV looks like a boxy 1980's range rover to me and i am not in to that look at all. And that front end good god that is ugly..... But I love the interior look and all of the nice appointments... Hopefully in the future they can have some different styling... I certainly would not be opposed to diversifying my EV fleet (and by fleet I mean 2 cars lol)
 
Damn the Rivians look like they are amazing vehicles with some really cool little quirks and features... Very well built too.... But I just can't get pas the look... The SUV looks like a boxy 1980's range rover to me and i am not in to that look at all. And that front end good god that is ugly..... But I love the interior look and all of the nice appointments... Hopefully in the future they can have some different styling... I certainly would not be opposed to diversifying my EV fleet (and by fleet I mean 2 cars lol)
I can't say I disagree with you on the front end. However, will ask, have you seen one in person. Myself, admittedly, I hated the front end of the truck in photos / videos. The rest was just OK. However, once I saw it in person, it looks SO MUCH better in real life than it does in photos / videos. So, if you haven't seen one in person close up, would reserve judgment until you do. You might still hate it, but at least then you will have a full picture of it. For whatever reason, it is just one of those vehicles that doesn't show well in photos. Just about everyone that sees it tells me the same thing, looks so much better in person.
 
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JER85

Member
Jul 13, 2021
819
2,365
NJ
I can't say I disagree with you on the front end. However, will ask, have you seen one in person. Myself, admittedly, I hated the front end of the truck in photos / videos. The rest was just OK. However, once I saw it in person, it looks SO MUCH better in real life than it does in photos / videos. So, if you haven't seen one in person close up, would reserve judgment until you do. You might still hate it, but at least then you will have a full picture of it. For whatever reason, it is just one of those vehicles that doesn't show well in photos. Just about everyone that sees it tells me the same thing, looks so much better in person.

I saw the pickup truck from a distance and it was the side profile and the back.. I actually don't mind the look of the truck (with the exception of the front)... But yeah maybe you're right, seeing it in person up close might change my view on it.
 
I am selling my Model X as the family loves the R1S. R1S ride comfort is way better than the Model X. Long trips are more enjoyable compared to the Model . Tesla scores on the autopilot tech. That was the main reason why bought a Tesla. The Rivian ADAS is better than most legacy automakers that I have tested so far like Mercedes, Volvo, BMW. Tesla scores here. With the after-pandemic life, I am not commuting on the freeway every day so the R1S' capabilities are good enough for me.

The only thing I will miss is the supercharging network on long drives. But that is a risk I am willing to take with the many different charger networks that are mushrooming everywhere and 99% of my charging is done at home anyway.
 

cusetownusa

2022 LR5 MSM/Bl | 19"
Jan 29, 2020
1,150
2,532
Syracuse NY
I am selling my Model X as the family loves the R1S. R1S ride comfort is way better than the Model X. Long trips are more enjoyable compared to the Model . Tesla scores on the autopilot tech. That was the main reason why bought a Tesla. The Rivian ADAS is better than most legacy automakers that I have tested so far like Mercedes, Volvo, BMW. Tesla scores here. With the after-pandemic life, I am not commuting on the freeway every day so the R1S' capabilities are good enough for me.

The only thing I will miss is the supercharging network on long drives. But that is a risk I am willing to take with the many different charger networks that are mushrooming everywhere and 99% of my charging is done at home anyway.

Are you comparing the current Model X to your R1S or the older one. Also, do you have a service center near you? That is my biggest concern, along with road tripping without the supercharging network.

I really like the R1S but the above 2 concerns, along with the price tag, are keeping me from ordering one.
 
Are you comparing the current Model X to your R1S or the older one. Also, do you have a service center near you? That is my biggest concern, along with road tripping without the supercharging network.

I really like the R1S but the above 2 concerns, along with the price tag, are keeping me from ordering one.

I am comparing it to my 2019 MX and doing an apple to apple comparison based on the alternating drives we have been doing as a family. I have a Rivian SC near me in Seattle and they are opening a couple more.

With the prices for Model X going skywards after the refresh and not a lot of comfort features being added apart from the seats heating+cooling, I was not going to upgrade to the New X.

I reserved my R1S in 2019 so, I was able to get it with a lower price tag. The R1S is still lower in price than the X and based on what I have experienced so far, has more value for money.

Things that I will miss once I sell my Tesla are 1. Supercharging network 2. A better autopilot 3. Automatic closing of all the doors 4. Falcon wing doors (kids).
 
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X Fan

Active Member
Supporting Member
Sep 29, 2015
2,673
7,064
Naples, FL & Cary, NC
Rivian seats are not comfortable (lots of available feedback on that) but pricing is of course much less.

Lack of service and charging locations are a non-starter for me. I lived through birthing pains for Tesla and don’t want to repeat that again.

If I move off the Tesla platform for local needs I would consider the Lyric (which I have a deposit on for a 2024).
 
Rivian seats are not comfortable (lots of available feedback on that) but pricing is of course much less.

For me personally, compared to my Model S and my Model X, the Rivian seats are such a blessing ! The sporty ride of the Model X (Raven adaptive suspension) and the smooth ride of the Rivian probably play into the seats, ride comfort as well.

The post-pandemic work situation has tilted me strongly in support of moving away from Tesla. If I was doing weekend drives more, supercharging would've played a pivotal role. But given that the Rivian charge port is compatible with a host of other networks, I am just gonna take the risk.

The Lyric is awesome based on the configurations and expected outcomes. I am pretty sure in the next two years, we will have more choices. Tesla will still have the upper hand as the early mover in the market but more options means better competition and consumers will benefit.
 
Are you comparing the current Model X to your R1S or the older one. Also, do you have a service center near you? That is my biggest concern, along with road tripping without the supercharging network.

I really like the R1S but the above 2 concerns, along with the price tag, are keeping me from ordering one.
So many are concerned with losing Tesla's supercharging network if they give up their Tesla. And it's a given, Tesla's supercharging network is second to none. For a road trip, they're reliable in most cases and easy to use.

I guess the more relevant question is, how often do you really use it? If it's just once, twice or three times a year, is it really worth sacrificing all the other capabilities just to have a more reliable charging network a couple times a year?

For those that road trip on a very regular basis, the argument for a Tesla gets stronger. But, that also depends on where you're at and where you're going. For me, I'm in an area where EV's are common and public charging is plentiful. So in most cases, I plan my trips a little conservatively. I'll choose a charger well within my vehicle's range. Then, if that one happens to be non-functional, I know I can make it to the next one. For me, I only use public charging 2-3 times a year and mostly for just one stop. Anything longer than that, I'll generally fly to, rather than drive.

So in my case, the public charging network carried very little weight in my decision making process. I've now had the Rivian for 6+ months. I've taken a few road trips with it. A couple of minor issues here and there with public charging networks, but, have always found a way to charge without too much inconvenience. In those cases, it would have been nice to have the supercharging network. But, that was what, 2-3 days of use out of 365 days a year. They were MINOR inconveniences on a couple of occasions for 362 days of bliss. Thus, the positives far outweigh the negatives.

Furthermore, in my case, I can travel further in my Rivian than I ever could in the Tesla. A trip to Vegas, I can make without stopping. Never could in the Tesla, not even close. Also, despite what rated charging speeds are, on my same trip to Arizona, I spent 20 minutes less charging on average with the Rivian than I did with the Tesla. So, the couple of issues I had with a charger being out of service, have been further offset by the fact that, for me and repeated trips I personally take, I spend notably less time charging. Overall, For a trip of up to 500 miles, which is about the max I'm willing to do in ANY EV, I actually much prefer road-tripping the Rivian than the Tesla.

Auto-Pilot, Tesla wins hands down in highway use. However, I much prefer the system in the Cadillac, which is truly hands-free. I hardly ever used the Tesla AP because of the constant nagging. Even with my hands on the wheel, it would still tell me to put weight on the wheel or wiggle or whatever. More work than just driving myself. While Tesla's AP capabilities are superior to all others, the fact that they've chosen to keep this antiquated method of policing driver attentiveness is a big turn off for me.

In the past, my two must haves were, AP and Supercharging. Over time, after 9 years with various Tesla's, that changed. AP when it first came out was amazing. But, then all the YouTube idiots posted their stupidity and they've ruined the experience for me with all the nagging.

While not as good as Tesla's supercharging network, the public chargers are being built out for other EV's at a pretty rapid pace. In my areas, there are more than enough options. Others will need to check their own areas and map out their typical road trips to see how well the public chargers will serve their use cases. If you have enough pubic chargers along your common routes, including backup locations, then I personally prefer roadtripping in a Rivian. Furthermore, Rivian's range estimate is actually accurate and USEFUL. Tesla always says I have 365 miles in range, yet I'm lucky to get 250 at highway speeds. Completely useless range estimate. For whatever reason, they've chosen to not have range estimates vary based on each driver's real world use, as pretty much every other EV maker does.

As far as Service Centers. Out of your control. Rivian, like Tesla, offers mobile service for many things. Many people waiting for Rivian delivery are doing so because Rivian won't sell vehicles in areas they can't service yet. Many first day reservation holders are still waiting because there's no service center near the owner's location. Tesla has had 10+ years to build up. Rivian will get there. But, something to check. If there's a Rivian service center within 50 miles of your location, then you're all set and this isn't an issue. Tesla wins this category only because they've had more time to build up. But, if Rivian has a service center near you, then in those particular areas, Tesla has no benefit over the Rivian. Check the Rivian maps for Service Center locations and the Coming Soon locations. Tesla only wins this category if Rivian does not have a Service Center or one planned in a particular area where a buyer is located.
 
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So many are concerned with losing Tesla's supercharging network if they give up their Tesla. And it's a given, Tesla's supercharging network is second to none. For a road trip, they're reliable in most cases and easy to use.

I guess the more relevant question is, how often do you really use it? If it's just once, twice or three times a year, is it really worth sacrificing all the other capabilities just to have a more reliable charging network a couple times a year?

For those that road trip on a very regular basis, the argument for a Tesla gets stronger. But, that also depends on where you're at and where you're going. For me, I'm in an area where EV's are common and public charging is plentiful. So in most cases, I plan my trips a little conservatively. I'll choose a charger well within my vehicle's range. Then, if that one happens to be non-functional, I know I can make it to the next one. For me, I only use public charging 2-3 times a year and mostly for just one stop. Anything longer than that, I'll generally fly to, rather than drive.

So in my case, the public charging network carried very little weight in my decision making process. I've now had the Rivian for 6+ months. I've taken a few road trips with it. A couple of minor issues here and there with public charging networks, but, have always found a way to charge without too much inconvenience. In those cases, it would have been nice to have the supercharging network. But, that was what, 2-3 days of use out of 365 days a year. They were MINOR inconveniences on a couple of occasions for 362 days of bliss. Thus, the positives far outweigh the negatives.

Furthermore, in my case, I can travel further in my Rivian than I ever could in the Tesla. A trip to Vegas, I can make without stopping. Never could in the Tesla, not even close. Also, despite what rated charging speeds are, on my same trip to Arizona, I spent 20 minutes less charging on average with the Rivian than I did with the Tesla. So, the couple of issues I had with a charger being out of service, have been further offset by the fact that, for me and repeated trips I personally take, I spend notably less time charging. Overall, For a trip of up to 500 miles, which is about the max I'm willing to do in ANY EV, I actually much prefer road-tripping the Rivian than the Tesla.

Auto-Pilot, Tesla wins hands down in highway use. However, I much prefer the system in the Cadillac, which is truly hands-free. I hardly ever used the Tesla AP because of the constant nagging. Even with my hands on the wheel, it would still tell me to put weight on the wheel or wiggle or whatever. More work than just driving myself. While Tesla's AP capabilities are superior to all others, the fact that they've chosen to keep this antiquated method of policing driver attentiveness is a big turn off for me.

In the past, my two must haves were, AP and Supercharging. Over time, after 9 years with various Tesla's, that changed. AP when it first came out was amazing. But, then all the YouTube idiots posted their stupidity and they've ruined the experience for me with all the nagging.

While not as good as Tesla's supercharging network, the public chargers are being built out for other EV's at a pretty rapid pace. In my areas, there are more than enough options. Others will need to check their own areas and map out their typical road trips to see how well the public chargers will serve their use cases. If you have enough pubic chargers along your common routes, including backup locations, then I personally prefer roadtripping in a Rivian. Furthermore, Rivian's range estimate is actually accurate and USEFUL. Tesla always says I have 365 miles in range, yet I'm lucky to get 250 at highway speeds. Completely useless range estimate. For whatever reason, they've chosen to not have range estimates vary based on each driver's real world use, as pretty much every other EV maker does.

As far as Service Centers. Out of your control. Rivian, like Tesla, offers mobile service for many things. Many people waiting for Rivian delivery are doing so because Rivian won't sell vehicles in areas they can't service yet. Many first day reservation holders are still waiting because there's no service center near the owner's location. Tesla has had 10+ years to build up. Rivian will get there. But, something to check. If there's a Rivian service center within 50 miles of your location, then you're all set and this isn't an issue. Tesla wins this category only because they've had more time to build up. But, if Rivian has a service center near you, then in those particular areas, Tesla has no benefit over the Rivian. Check the Rivian maps for Service Center locations and the Coming Soon locations. Tesla only wins this category if Rivian does not have a Service Center or one planned in a particular area where a buyer is located.

This is exactly my thoughts too. I knew getting the R1T I would have some pains around fast charging when on road trips. But I also know I only do 1-2 a year and the truck itself makes up for that in many other ways. Sure enough, when we drove to Arizona from San Diego a few months back, I ran into charging issues (speed, broken chargers, lines). it felt like being in a Tesla again back in 2015.

But aside from that, I'm loving it. My nearest service center is only 15 min away. Customer service has been great. And most importantly, the truck has been great. I came from a Model 3 Performance last (Owned Model S first, then several Model 3's) and when the lease was up, I had to decide what to get next. At the price I was able to get into on the Rivian R1T, it was just about the same price as a LR Model Y. I feel I got so much better value out of anything else compared to the price range.

That's not to say I won't get the Cybertruck if it ever comes out though...more for the durability of the exterior and as an added bonus, the supercharging network.
 
I originally posted that the Tesla likely wins as a road trip vehicle due to better efficiency. And technically, being that it only has a 100 kwh battery, it is more efficient. However, having now road tripped my Rivian several times, I struggle to give the edge to Tesla. Tesla certainly has the edge when it comes to the Supercharging network. Absolutely better than public EV chargers.

Rivian has a 135 kwh battery. But, where I noticed the biggest difference between the two cars is in "Real World" driving. My Tesla would tell me I had 370 miles in range. However, when travelling at "go with the flow of traffic" speeds, which is 75-85 mph on most west coast freeways through the desert, and even then, you get run over by many, my Tesla got around 70% of the rated range at those speeds. Was fortunate to get 259 miles. 260 miles on a 100 kWh battery is still more efficient than a 260 miles in the Rivian on a 135 kWh battery, but I'm not really concerned with that when travelling. What I care about most, is how far can I go with what I have?

In the Rivian, at 75-80 MPH, I actually get very close to the rated range. The truck tells me I have 300 miles in range and I can actually go 300 miles, driving "NORMALLY" and not having to hyper-mile. A couple of weeks ago, for the first time ever, with my Rivian, I was able to comfortably make it from northern Los Angeles city to Las Vegas without stopping to charge. Was never able to do that at those speeds in the Tesla.

Furthermore, the Tesla technically charges quicker than the Rivian does. However, to get the "real world" range back to 260 miles, you have to charge to 100%. As we all know, charging to 100% takes forever as charger slows drastically over 75-80%. With the Rivian, I only need to charge to around 82% to get the same "real world" range. So, what I lose to the Tesla in the early charging, I gain back in the fact that the Rivian is still charging at a higher rate at 80% than the Tesla is at 95+%. In my own "real world" testing, I would have to charge the Tesla for about 70 minutes to get the range I needed. To get the same range in the Rivian, it takes about 40 minutes. So, I save a good 30 minutes. Yes, I'm using more energy in the Rivian, but my road trip is definitely around 30 minutes quicker with the Rivian and the 135 kwh battery than the Tesla is with its 100 kwh battery. For me, I care more about the time than I do spending a few extra dollars for a few extra kwh of battery charging.

Rivian is building their own charging network, which I had the good fortunate to be able to use in Barstow. It was great, just as easy as Tesla supercharging. Problem is, there are currently only a few of them in service versus superchargers being everywhere. Assuming I don't have a problem with public chargers, then personally, I have to say I prefer road tripping in the Rivian since it gets me there 30 minutes quicker than does the Tesla.

So yes, the Tesla is still more efficient. But, the Rivian's bigger battery gives it more capability. Having now experienced it for a few months, my first choice for road trips over 300 miles would be in he Rivian.

And I'm sure this post will really rile up the Tesla faithful. Say what you need to, to make yourselves feel better. I love Tesla's, but have now experienced both and am simply speaking the reality. Want to change? Tell Tesla to put a bigger battery in their cars, then they'd be both, more efficient and able to travel further. It's not about the Rivian being better, rather, just that they chose to go with a bigger battery, making it better in terms of how far it can go on a single charge. Absolutely nothing personal. It is what it is. For a 250 mile trip, then the Tesla is probably better. For over 300 miles, I'd rather have the Rivian.
They aren’t making the 135kw battery. Fugazi. I did race a rivian r1s in a LR X refresh - it wasn’t even close by 60 and I pulled truck lengths by 100.
 
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They aren’t making the 135kw battery. Fugazi. I did race a rivian r1s in a LR X refresh - it wasn’t even close by 60 and I pulled truck lengths by 100.
Not like it matters but he was probably in all purpose drive mode which didn’t have the full power. Only in sport mode it uses all the available power. Based on the 0-60, you wouldn’t have pulled on him if he was in sorry mode.
 
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Not like it matters but he was probably in all purpose drive mode which didn’t have the full power. Only in sport mode it uses all the available power. Based on the 0-60, you wouldn’t have pulled on him if he was in sorry mode.
It's buslengths above 60, either way

This makes sense, Rivian's powertrain isn't really designed to support sustained high power at high speed, that's not really what an off-road -capable vehicle is for is it. Range Rover SVR's are terrible from a roll too. The refresh X/S are probably the best in the industry at minimizing all the weaknesses of an EV powertrain at high speeds, even better than the transmission-equipped VWAG cars
 
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