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If I change tires to 22 from 20, will it affect range severely?

hare613

New Member
Jun 27, 2017
4
0
China
I got the reward from Referral, a set of 22 inch tires, but I am not sure if I should use them, I was told that it will lose about 20% of range if change to 22 from 20, really..? this much?

And ... also it could cause people inside the car feel more clearly about the bumps in the road, and more noises since the tires become thinner

seems other than much better look, 22 inch has no advantages to 20 inch tires at all ?
 

commasign

TeslaAdviceBlog.com
Aug 31, 2013
3,202
4,178
Davis, CA
If you go from 20" to 22", you'll lose 15% or more range. It's even worse in cold weather. I don't think it's bumpier, but the car feels more stable and confident on the 22" wheels especially when turning.
 

Tjhappel

Member
Dec 12, 2014
254
344
San Clemente, California
I went from 22 to 20, range affect is gigantic!! It looks way way better with 22’s but I drove too much every day and the 20’s allow me to get a bit over 200 miles of actual driving on my 90d. Avg wh/mile is 341 with 20’s, 22’s it was like 380.
 
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commasign

TeslaAdviceBlog.com
Aug 31, 2013
3,202
4,178
Davis, CA
There is another “advantage” to the 22’s. I’ve had several flat tires on my X with 20’s and once with the 22’s. The 22” Goodyear tire is $225 but the 20” Continental tire is $432! Not sure how much the Pirelli 22’s are though.
 

ps004ynos

Member
Mar 16, 2016
185
181
Los Angeles
Just another data point: I mainly drive highway and I was getting about 75% of range (max 260 in a X 90D ) with the 20's. I now clock in at 65% of range with the 22s.
 

BigMskiman

Active Member
Mar 14, 2016
1,146
695
Pleasanton, CA
Check reports on tire wear also. You may get more miles outta the 20"ers.
I've never had a flat on 20"ers in 2yrs, but two different cars and sets of tires.
 

ShockOnT

⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️⚡️
Jun 26, 2016
3,396
3,080
Sydney
The 20s should be much cheaper than the 22s, and will give you more range, smoother ride.
But, the 22s look better, handle better.
Now it’s up to you how much you value each of these attributes.
 

buttershrimp

Click my signature to Go Mad Max Mode
Jun 17, 2017
3,158
7,835
ATX
can someone ELI5 why the range is worse with larger diameter rims? Is it just higher rotational inertia?
Mainly because of how the weight is further from the center. I find however that the arachnid wheels in my s have improved my range , maybe even close to what people get on slip Streams, they are very light.... would be interesting to get some narrow carbon fiber wheels .... would add like 800 miles of range :)
 
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muleferg

Active Member
Dec 15, 2013
1,454
745
North Wilkesboro, NC
Love my 20" black.

IMG_3212.jpg
 

Peteybabes

redneck drivin' a tesla...
Apr 8, 2016
1,235
688
'murica
man i wish i had 20's so bad...my car came as it was and I've been getting 500+ wh/mile all winter and i'm sick of it. i was able to get to 390's this weekend by driving 70MPH on the highway and driving like a granny plus weather finally got above 40 degrees.

when driving a 100D X a couple months back it was getting 320s-340's in cold weather with 20" wheels and that was 80MPH highway. :D

the longest i've got on my car between charges on the highway has been 187 miles and that included driving at 0% for 8 miles to get to the nearest supercharger. LOL! If i had 20's i could have arrived with 5% easily.
 

Yinn

Active Member
Nov 15, 2016
2,100
1,890
Behind you
can someone ELI5 why the range is worse with larger diameter rims? Is it just higher rotational inertia?

The larger wheels have larger contact patches. The 20" wheels on Continentals use a 265/45-20 front tire and 275/45/20 rear tire. The tread width on those tires end up being 8.5" in the front and 8.9" in the rear. Compared to the 22" wheels w/ Pirelli Scorpions, they use a 265/35-22 front tire and a 285/35-22 rear tire. Those give a 9.5" tread width in the front and 10.5" in the rear. What does that mean? That means more tire is touching the ground, which creates more friction. Similiar to how towing a trailer creates air friction, this would be creating ground friction.

If we took a look at the tread width comparisons, it would be 11.7% larger on the 22" wheels and 17.9% larger on the rear tire. Taking all 4 into account, it comes out to be roughly 14.9% larger tread width for the contact patch which looks like a pretty familiar number. There's more that goes into it like load and PSI; but simplified the additional traction/friction from the 22's account for a lot of the efficiency loss.

If you have the Goodyear Eagle F1s instead of the Pirelli Scorpion Zero's, the mileage issue is slightly worse. The contact patches on the Goodyear's are 15% larger front, 18% larger rear. The traction ratings are also AA rated vs the A of the Pirelli's with a much higher rate of wear. This would indicate that as a tire, it's a stickier tire. That's good for traction, but bad for efficiency.

The second part of it is weight. In addition to being unsprung weight, the wheels and tires are a rotating mass. All of this means that a single pound of weight on those components is equielant to several multiples of that weight if it were inside the cabin.

For comparison again, weights for each not including air or wheel weights for balancing. 20" wheels on Continentals weigh in at 30lbs per tire for a wheel/tire combo weight of 62lbs front, 63.2lbs rear. The 22" wheels on Pirelli's are 71.6lbs front, 78.4lbs rear. That's 15.5% higher in the front, and 24% higher in the rear. Overall that's 19.8% more weight. Again, another number that looks familiar.

So what do you do if you absolutely want the oem 22's and don't want to take as bad of a mileage penalty? Look into other tires and overinflate a little. The Continental Extremecontact DWS 06 tire as an example weighs in at 27lbs on the front, 3 lbs lighter than the 20" oem tires and has a tread width that is just 7% larger.

Mainly because of how the weight is further from the center. I find however that the arachnid wheels in my s have improved my range , maybe even close to what people get on slip Streams, they are very light.... would be interesting to get some narrow carbon fiber wheels .... would add like 800 miles of range :)

I got curious about your arachnids, so I ran those too. I know the arachnids are forged and lighter, which probably offsets the traction penalty. On a 19" slipstream wheel with the Michelin Primacy MXM4 tire, it has a total weight of 57lbs per corner with a tread width of 8.4" Compared to the 21" arachnids, which weigh 52.85lbs on the front and 55.75lbs in the rear. On all 4 corners, the arachnids are 10.8lbs lighter than the slipstreams for a 5.1% weight reduction; even more if you're running a boxed setup.

When we get into looking at tread width, the slipstreams have a 8.4" contact patch using a 16" Michelin Primacy MXM4. It goes to 9.1" front and 9.5" rear on the 21" on Michellin PSS tires. On all 4 corners, that's 10.7% larger. Interestingly, if you went with the Contisport Contacts, the front treadwidth is exactly the same as the 19's and only the rears being larger. This setup would end up being only 4.2% larger on all 4 corners.

What's your exact setup? It might end up implying unsprung weight is the major factor here.
 

buttershrimp

Click my signature to Go Mad Max Mode
Jun 17, 2017
3,158
7,835
ATX
The larger wheels have larger contact patches. The 20" wheels on Continentals use a 265/45-20 front tire and 275/45/20 rear tire. The tread width on those tires end up being 8.5" in the front and 8.9" in the rear. Compared to the 22" wheels w/ Pirelli Scorpions, they use a 265/35-22 front tire and a 285/35-22 rear tire. Those give a 9.5" tread width in the front and 10.5" in the rear. What does that mean? That means more tire is touching the ground, which creates more friction. Similiar to how towing a trailer creates air friction, this would be creating ground friction.

If we took a look at the tread width comparisons, it would be 11.7% larger on the 22" wheels and 17.9% larger on the rear tire. Taking all 4 into account, it comes out to be roughly 14.9% larger tread width for the contact patch which looks like a pretty familiar number. There's more that goes into it like load and PSI; but simplified the additional traction/friction from the 22's account for a lot of the efficiency loss.

If you have the Goodyear Eagle F1s instead of the Pirelli Scorpion Zero's, the mileage issue is slightly worse. The contact patches on the Goodyear's are 15% larger front, 18% larger rear. The traction ratings are also AA rated vs the A of the Pirelli's with a much higher rate of wear. This would indicate that as a tire, it's a stickier tire. That's good for traction, but bad for efficiency.

The second part of it is weight. In addition to being unsprung weight, the wheels and tires are a rotating mass. All of this means that a single pound of weight on those components is equielant to several multiples of that weight if it were inside the cabin.

For comparison again, weights for each not including air or wheel weights for balancing. 20" wheels on Continentals weigh in at 30lbs per tire for a wheel/tire combo weight of 62lbs front, 63.2lbs rear. The 22" wheels on Pirelli's are 71.6lbs front, 78.4lbs rear. That's 15.5% higher in the front, and 24% higher in the rear. Overall that's 19.8% more weight. Again, another number that looks familiar.

So what do you do if you absolutely want the oem 22's and don't want to take as bad of a mileage penalty? Look into other tires and overinflate a little. The Continental Extremecontact DWS 06 tire as an example weighs in at 27lbs on the front, 3 lbs lighter than the 20" oem tires and has a tread width that is just 7% larger.



I got curious about your arachnids, so I ran those too. I know the arachnids are forged and lighter, which probably offsets the traction penalty. On a 19" slipstream wheel with the Michelin Primacy MXM4 tire, it has a total weight of 57lbs per corner with a tread width of 8.4" Compared to the 21" arachnids, which weigh 52.85lbs on the front and 55.75lbs in the rear. On all 4 corners, the arachnids are 10.8lbs lighter than the slipstreams for a 5.1% weight reduction; even more if you're running a boxed setup.

When we get into looking at tread width, the slipstreams have a 8.4" contact patch using a 16" Michelin Primacy MXM4. It goes to 9.1" front and 9.5" rear on the 21" on Michellin PSS tires. On all 4 corners, that's 10.7% larger. Interestingly, if you went with the Contisport Contacts, the front treadwidth is exactly the same as the 19's and only the rears being larger. This setup would end up being only 4.2% larger on all 4 corners.

What's your exact setup? It might end up implying unsprung weight is the major factor here.
I have the staggered wheels, arachnids, coming from turbines... I have super sports, and I tend to inflate well. I’ve gone 330 miles on the turbines, which was a challenge (Sweetwater to SantaRosa) and recently driving must faster Austin to Mt. Pleasant 310 miles on arachnids. But it’s not just anecdotal, I’ve noticed a big improvement on energy and range with the arachnids. Both have PSS. I did a lot of research on the different tires and right now, I’d have a hard time parting with the PSS. When I look at the raw weight of the tires, there was some benefit too to the PSS if I remember. BUt all in all, I’m actually thinking the contact area plays less of a role than the weight of the tire..... In fact, your explanation makes so much sense to me because I my past hypermile trips have surprised me how much the payload didn’t matter.... but wind and the tire weight matter tremendously... and temperature of course. Other things I’ve noticed as negligible are range mode, ludicrous if you aren’t flooring it, and stereo.

Long story short... your explanation about wheel weight having a far greater effect than payload makes all the sense in the world. I am super curious how far the car could go on a square arachnid set up. I think the width catching the wind on the back tire would make a real difference.

Finally.... I wish I could make snap on aero rims for my arachnids... it would be really great.
 
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jgrgnt

Supporting Member
Dec 13, 2016
372
366
Orange County, CA
Echoing what's been said. I get 25% less range than with the 20s. The ride with the 22s is slightly more harsh, but cornering and road feel are improved, and I don't find them to be any noisier. I put up with the range hit around town, but switch to 20s when we do long road trips.
 

Yinn

Active Member
Nov 15, 2016
2,100
1,890
Behind you
So is the consensus 15% range loss? Wonder if anybody tried putting on 19" wheels to extend range.

I'm sure some have tried, and there's threads on going to 19" Winters too. They mostly have experienced a reduction in range. That is partly expected though as it's not directly related to the size of the wheel and winter tires are grippier and have taller blocks that give superior cold traction but affect efficiency.

If we look at the Cylcones the same way we did the 22's and 21's, we see the total weight package is higher than on the 20's. The tire width is the same as well 265/275, so on paper it could actually be less efficient; but I doubt there would be any noticeable difference (~1% difference)

Echoing what's been said. I get 25% less range than with the 20s. The ride with the 22s is slightly more harsh, but cornering and road feel are improved, and I don't find them to be any noisier. I put up with the range hit around town, but switch to 20s when we do long road trips.

I do the same, I swap the 20's on when I road trip or tow. I do record my ranges and on 20's my averages are ~372wh/mi (w/o trailer) On 22's, my average has been 405wh/mi; or 9% higher than 20's.

For everyone else, depending on your driving habits, it may or may not actually matter. As an example, my daily commute is roughly 30 miles each way. On 20's I go through 35-40 miles of indicated range each way on 22's I go through 38-43 miles each way. It really depends on each person's individual situation. Because of my daily habits, it really doesn't make a difference to me on a day to day basis.

I thought I heard someone put arachnids on a model X which I'd love to see, but tire choice would be hard to figure out.

A white X is running around with graphite arachnids.
9606c8b9-560e-470f-8e50-818804dc4072-jpeg.292541


I like them better on the S than the X. On the X, I still prefer the 22 turbines.
aafda06a-ef74-4a87-a567-94dc79f70dfa-jpeg.292757
 

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