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Just ordered Model 3, need to set up charging, recommendations?

beachsideev

Member
May 23, 2020
279
136
usa
@beachsideev $200 sounds like a great deal for UMC. They seem to go for $300+ on eBay even for gen1 as I just checked.

yeah it was a pretty food deal. the seller had mislabeled it as a wall connector so it didn't turn up in a search for umc. They still occasionally pop up for <$250, though.

$450 for a couple of feet of wire and labor sounds high to me.
 

derekmw

Member
Oct 3, 2016
629
905
San Diego, CA
The M3 SR+ can charge at maximum 32AMP. All you need is a 240V 40AMP breaker with the proper gauge wire. (I think 8 gauge may be enough but I'm not an electrician). You will need 4 wire to properly wire the 14-50, 2 hot, 1 neutral and 1 ground. You can use a 14-50 outlet on a 40AMP circuit. Depending on how far from the panel the outlet is, the wire will be the most expensive part of the build.

I would not put 2 charges on the same circuit. I would have a separate 120V 15amp outlet for the Prius Prime

I think you shouldn't limit it based on the current model 3. If you get a wall charger later on, or even a few years down as more EV options become available, you may limit your charging ability. I installed 50amp 5 years back so I could charge at 40amp (the charger that came with Model S then allowed you to), but I'm already wishing I would have gone higher
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
3,712
3,375
Maine
@beachsideev $200 sounds like a great deal for UMC. They seem to go for $300+ on eBay even for gen1 as I just checked.
@AlexP I probably will still go with pros to install it for me, even if I could follow Youtube videos and do the install myself. My install is relatively simple - just need the outlet right below panel, so really could do it myself. But I'm just worried about load, or any hidden risk that an electrician might find.
@DaveG_NJ I got a quote for $450 for NEMA 14-50 + $69 for breakers, $150 for permit, and $169 for an extra 120V for my Prius Prime. Cheaper than yours mainly because my outlet can be right below the panel on the garage wall, so at most 1 foot of running wire is needed. I'm waiting for more quotes right now.
$490 for a NEMA 14-50 just below your box, with a 120V outlet, which includes a permit is a fair deal. Material cost is probably under $100, but you have a permit and you're paying a pro.
 

AlexP

Member
Nov 13, 2018
109
30
Miami, FL
@beachsideev $200 sounds like a great deal for UMC. They seem to go for $300+ on eBay even for gen1 as I just checked.
@AlexP I probably will still go with pros to install it for me, even if I could follow Youtube videos and do the install myself. My install is relatively simple - just need the outlet right below panel, so really could do it myself. But I'm just worried about load, or any hidden risk that an electrician might find.
@DaveG_NJ I got a quote for $450 for NEMA 14-50 + $69 for breakers, $150 for permit, and $169 for an extra 120V for my Prius Prime. Cheaper than yours mainly because my outlet can be right below the panel on the garage wall, so at most 1 foot of running wire is needed. I'm waiting for more quotes right now.

UMC Gen 1 is actually better than Gen 2. Gen 1 provides up to 40amps and I think it has a bit longer cable too, 20 feet if I'm not mistaken. Gen 1 only provides 32amps and the cable is 18feet (I believe). Gen 1 are going for more money than Gen 2.

I recently bought a Gen 2 Wall Connector that can provide up to 80amps (only using it at 48amps) and it has a 24 feet cable, black (not signature) for $350 + shipping on OfferUp. I'm looking for a low profile bracket if any one has one laying around.
 

ml678

Member
Oct 29, 2020
12
2
New Jersey
$490 for a NEMA 14-50 just below your box, with a 120V outlet, which includes a permit is a fair deal. Material cost is probably under $100, but you have a permit and you're paying a pro.

The permit is actually $150 extra, and 120V outlet also $169 extra, the tandem break is $69 extra. So total was $490+69+169+150 = $880. The $490 was for NEMA alone.
 

garth_angst

Member
Mar 30, 2019
344
127
long island
@Gasaraki The usual daily max we travel would be within range probably in winter (120 miles). However it's a good point that if we should keep it in mind for any longer day trips. What's the usual range for SR+ in
@NickFile OK will follow the suggestions to check

Realize also that you would lose 10-40% range in the winter. I live on Long Island, am a very cautious driver, and I was down about 25% in the winter last year.
 

augkuo

Active Member
Apr 24, 2011
1,000
2,945
Berkeley
I also thought I read somewhere that there's a Fed tax credit for installing charging equipment for EVs up to $1000? Couldn't find it now, I wonder if it's for all equipment or just specific equipment from ChargePoint etc. places.

Form 8911 https://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/f8911.pdf, instructionshttps://www.irs.gov/pub/irs-pdf/i8911.pdf

It's for all equipment including install - also it's retroactive so if you've installed a charger in previous years (up to 2018) you can claim the tax credit.

4 things you need to know about the EV Charging Tax Credit | The Environmental Center
 

valaeyron

Member
Sep 8, 2020
244
130
Virginia
I installed a 14-50 in my garage and use an umc with the 14-50 adapter. I picked up a second umc that I leave in the car for about $200 on ebay. I also splurged and bought the $35 cable organizer from tesla to relieve strain on the umc cable/adapter. It works for me and was fairly inexpensive.

nice. I have a bag of golf clubs I use for the same purpose lol
 

ml678

Member
Oct 29, 2020
12
2
New Jersey
@garth_angst Winter indeed has a big effect. That's why I was thinking of Tesla a couple years ago but ended up buying Prius Prime instead, cheaper and no range anxiety. One beef I had with Prius Prime was how slow and battery bleeding heating the cabin was during winter. Probably 3-5x slower to heat up compared to ICE. How's Model 3?

@augkuo Cool, thanks for the link! Seems that only 30% is covered up to $1000. Still, it helps.
 

JBHemlock

Member
Dec 16, 2019
46
42
Seattle, WA
I just want to throw this out there, because it's easy to assume you've got to put in high amperage 220 circuits for charging an electric car - there isn't a lot of information out there about just what it takes to keep an EV charged up.

When I bought my SR+, I also assumed I would have to wire in a 40-60A 220 circuit for a level 2 charger, considering I mainly drive a 50 mile round trip for my weekday commute. Out of sheer laziness, I didn't end up doing that before I picked up the car last December, figuring I'd just use 110 and the trickle charger that comes with it, using superchargers until I could schedule an electrician.

It's been nearly a year, and I still charge off of my 110V 15A circuit. I normally leave home at about 8:30 am, and get home around 6:30 pm, so the car is on the charger for 14 hours on week days. That's enough to *almost* keep up with the weekly drive. Including extended charging times on the weekend, I'm able to keep it charged up just fine on my level 1 charger.

I'm not saying "Bah! Don't get a better charger!" - I'm still planning on getting a 220V circuit put in when my wife gets her Tesla so that we can both charge from that. Depending on how much you drive, though, you might be able to get by just fine with a regular outlet and your level 1 charger.

For the record, by the way: I live in Seattle, so winters aren't as cold as in some places, but they *are* extended and chilly. Depending on where you live, you might not get enough power through a level 1 charger to do more than just break even.
 

lolder

Member
Jun 11, 2016
913
704
SW Florida
Make sure they use a Hubbell or equivalent 14-50 outlet, not a Levitron or Lowes/HomeDepot one. The Hubbells have V grip terminals which are much better.
 

SAR in NJ

New Member
Oct 29, 2020
4
0
New Jersey
Hi there @ml678 Sounds like you've received some pretty good information so far.

I just picked up my Model 3 SR+ last month and had my electrician install the NEMA 14-50 in the garage for just under $500. I'm located at the Jersey Shore. Good luck!
 

ShaolinJ

Member
Aug 5, 2020
74
70
Las Vegas
Here is what I have done.
First, think about how much you will normally be driving. On a normal day I drive about 50 miles, the most I will drive would be 100 miles (not including any long trips out of town)
Then think about how long your car is normally in the garage and will be plugged in. I am normally home before 8pm, and rarely leave the house before 9am.
I have found I have no problem at all charging with a nema 5-20 20 amp outelt which I already have several of in my garage. You just need the $35 adapter from tesla and thats it.
So far, the lowest my charge has gotten just driving around the city is about 39%. This took around 17 hrs to recharge to 80%. However, on a normal day it only takes 7-8 hours to recharge. I honestly have no need given my current driving patterns to install any faster charging.

As I said, the key is how much will you drive, and how fast do you need to recharge.
 

ml678

Member
Oct 29, 2020
12
2
New Jersey
Hi there @ml678 Sounds like you've received some pretty good information so far.

I just picked up my Model 3 SR+ last month and had my electrician install the NEMA 14-50 in the garage for just under $500. I'm located at the Jersey Shore. Good luck!

@SAR in NJ Can you let me know your electrician's info? The one place that replied to me so far was quoting $490 (NEMA) + $69 (breaker) + $150 permit to install, even though I specified that the outlet should be right at the panel (so it should be the cheapest kind of install). Sounds like yours is less expensive.

@ShaolinJ @JBHemlock Unfortunately our driving won't fit such solutions. But otherwise indeed I'd go for minimalistic approaches.

@lolder Will try to go for that.
 

SAR in NJ

New Member
Oct 29, 2020
4
0
New Jersey
@SAR in NJ Can you let me know your electrician's info? The one place that replied to me so far was quoting $490 (NEMA) + $69 (breaker) + $150 permit to install, even though I specified that the outlet should be right at the panel (so it should be the cheapest kind of install). Sounds like yours is less expensive.

Sure: Carmen at C&S Electric in Oceanport 732-389-2117
 

jkburns

Member
Sep 22, 2020
45
42
Minnesota
Make sure they use a Hubbell or equivalent 14-50 outlet, not a Levitron or Lowes/HomeDepot one. The Hubbells have V grip terminals which are much better.
I totally agree. Just went through this entire process and the Hubbell outlet is DEFINITELY the way to go. More expensive for sure, but you're getting what you pay for.
 

yerEVan

Red Plaid/Cream/CF/19"/OD-5/27-Delivered 9/11
Dec 29, 2018
1,242
2,217
Near Philly
Be SURE to get top-tier receptacle / outlet for your charger. There are several threads on that topic in TMC.

Charging pulls high current for extended periods. Defects, deterioration or wear that impairs the connection can lead to heating. Overheating can lead to fire.

EV charging is not an area to pinch every penny. No need to stay awake worrying.
  1. Get solid installation of good quality material. If the electrician offers to cut material cost by using a smaller wire, say, “No, thanks.”
  2. Once a month check for hot spots. Start charging your car at maximum current. After an hour, use the back of your hand-more sensitive-to feel:
    1. Charge outlet circuit breaker in main panel.
    2. The electric line to your garage, if it’s exposed at some point.
    3. The outlet where you plug in the charger.
    4. The adapter/plug that goes into the outlet.
If any of these are hot, especially too hot to keep your hand in contact, then stop charging and call in a licensed electrician. Tell them which area(s) were hot. They can diagnose and correct the problem before it’s too late.
I bought a Milwaukee laser temp gun just for this reason. I have another post somewhere here about super hot connectors, overheating big time. And it came down to my not torquing the connections to spec. Finally did that and temps dropped ridiculously (in a good way). I check the temps all the time but finally I’m not scared that it will overheat.
 

garth_angst

Member
Mar 30, 2019
344
127
long island
@garth_angst Winter indeed has a big effect. That's why I was thinking of Tesla a couple years ago but ended up buying Prius Prime instead, cheaper and no range anxiety. One beef I had with Prius Prime was how slow and battery bleeding heating the cabin was during winter. Probably 3-5x slower to heat up compared to ICE. How's Model 3?

@augkuo Cool, thanks for the link! Seems that only 30% is covered up to $1000. Still, it helps.

Because it is electric heat, it is pretty much immediate and heats up quick. Out winter (like yours) last year was milder than normal, so I mostly went with the heated seats over the heat. It was my only winter I had the car. Since I will be working from home at least until Feb 21, there will not be much winter driving this year either.
Maybe I will be much more rich by winter 2021-2022, so that heating and lowering my range will be an afterthought.
 

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