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Latest Software?

LukeT

Member
Apr 9, 2019
734
339
UK
You'll get whatever's on the car when it was built (I got 2019.15) then it's the wait for an update. Took two weeks for me.. suspiciously it updated after I raised it with the service centre and they said it was impossible to make it come any faster..

I picked mine up first week of Aug with 2019.15. It updated itself to 2019.28 a couple of weeks later. It would've made no difference to me had it been later, I don't think. As above, worry about the paint instead!
 
I started off with 2019.15. Just been upgraded to 2019.32.1 after just under 2 weeks. All went smoothly. I didn't need to hassle the SC about anything.
It's not a revolutionary upgrade. Dog mode is nice, plus there are some extra games. Other than that, much as before.
 
Just got 2019.32.2.1. Not sure what's changed as I've only updated from the App.
This is definitely the latest, out this morning Saturday 14 September 2019. Downloaded it an hour ago. Seems to be mainly about replacement tyres and wheels, and recalibrating the tyre pressure sensors, range estimates etc. You detail what you have put on, and it works it out.
 
This is definitely the latest, out this morning Saturday 14 September 2019. Downloaded it an hour ago. Seems to be mainly about replacement tyres and wheels, and recalibrating the tyre pressure sensors, range estimates etc. You detail what you have put on, and it works it out.
Yep. Seems nice but nothing to write home about
So far no major bugs detected :)
 

WannabeOwner

Well-Known Member
Nov 2, 2015
6,982
3,743
Suffolk, UK
Can someone explain the two types of software supplied. I understand that V10 is on its way and that’s firmware - is that for major changes and the other software updates are more regularly supplied?

I don't think it can viewed quite like that.

Some other cars e.g. Jaguar iPace have modularised software, so one bit can be upgraded but not another.

Tesla is a single version. Each time it is updated the whole lot moves to that version.

So when Version 10 comes out your next update is V10 (whether you want it, or not ... you can decline to receive any updates, but you can't pick and choose which bits)

After a major update like V10 there are a flurry of releases for both bug-fixes and any new features which were not ready in time for the main launch.

After that there are further bug fixes, and any other improvements that are deemed worthy. For example, a year or so back thieves discovered they could bypass the Passive Entry system to get into the car and drive it away. That was the case for all high-end brands that had Passive Entry, but Tesla released an update "Pin to Drive" within a couple of months which solved the problem. For other brands you can either turn off, and do without the convenience of, Passive Entry ... or pay a premium price for a much more fancy key fob ... or keep your fob in a Faraday-cage pouch. That's the difference, for me, between a software-lead approach like Tesla or a convention engineering approach like legacy-Auto.
 
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I don't think it can viewed quite like that.

Some other cars e.g. Jaguar iPace have modularised software, so one bit can be upgraded but not another.

Tesla is a single version. Each time it is updated the whole lot moves to that version.

So when Version 10 comes out your next update is V10 (whether you want it, or not ... you can decline to receive any updates, but you can't pick and choose which bits)

After a major update like V10 there are a flurry of releases for both bug-fixes and any new features which were not ready in time for the main launch.

After that there are further bug fixes, and any other improvements that are deemed worthy. For example, a year or so back thieves discovered they could bypass the Passive Entry system to get into the car and drive it away. That was the case for all high-end brands that had Passive Entry, but Tesla released an update "Pin to Drive" within a couple of months which solved the problem. For other brands you can either turn off, and do without the convenience of, Passive Entry ... or pay a premium price for a much more fancy key fob ... or keep your fob in a Faraday-cage pouch. That's the difference, for me, between a software-lead approach like Tesla or a convention engineering approach like legacy-Auto.
Ok, but how do you explain version control?
Currently being 2019.32.2.1
 

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