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Looking for a way to get the max on my replacement 85 kw battery model S 2014

Hello Everyone out there I have bad news and good new. My low mileage 2014 Model S 60 main battery went out on me three weeks ago and luckily it was still under warranty that the bad and good news. But here the problem that I’m facing no, I honor the warranty and put a new 85 battery in which I was totally happy about. But will only upgrade the software to a 70 kw. The range get fully charged is 225 and I asked Tesla about the upgrade and was told they could only reset to a 70 kw which they said would give maybe an extra 15 miles in range for $2k. For $2k I would want the maximum range s 85 kw battery would produce. Is it possible that after they put it in Tesla, could have performed an electronic upgrade on the M60 to make it a M85 using their over-the-air update wizardry? It seems to me such an upgrade would make the car more valuable to me with range of a M85 rather than what I had as a M60? Just curious. Looking for a way to get the true max out of my new battery on a teacher income. Any suggestions I would greatly appreciate. Thank, Matt
 

AustinP

Active Member
Apr 6, 2015
1,401
1,132
Belgium
If memory serves price difference between a 60 and 85 S in 2014 was in the 10k.
So it makes sense to me that Tesla covers the warranty agreement by replacing your battery with whatever battery that can provide the equivalent to what you had, a 60.
Locking a 85 battery to 60 equivalent is a great service actually: now you can also charge to 100% without any risks to damage the battery prematurely.
That Tesla offers for a price to upgrade to 70 equivalent is also very nice from them.
If they would propose the 85 upgrade, that should be priced around 10k, the price difference of 60 vs 85.
Otherwise, that would be unfair to those who bought an 85.
Just my opinion.
 
If memory serves price difference between a 60 and 85 S in 2014 was in the 10k.
So it makes sense to me that Tesla covers the warranty agreement by replacing your battery with whatever battery that can provide the equivalent to what you had, a 60.
Locking a 85 battery to 60 equivalent is a great service actually: now you can also charge to 100% without any risks to damage the battery prematurely.
That Tesla offers for a price to upgrade to 70 equivalent is also very nice from them.
If they would propose the 85 upgrade, that should be priced around 10k, the price difference of 60 vs 85.
Otherwise, that would be unfair to those who bought an 85.
Just my opinion.
Thanks Austin and respect your opinion and greatly appreciate i.
 

zzzzoeffff

Member
Oct 18, 2018
18
25
Belgium
Tesla is downgrading S85 batteries to max 60-65kWh user accessable capacity via OTA firmware. So it would be extremely strange that they would allow a new or refurbished battery pack to get access to its full capacity. You get what all early adopters are getting, only difference is that you get the choice.
 

dgatwood

Member
Dec 20, 2017
981
1,125
Sunnyvale, ca
Locking a 85 battery to 60 equivalent is a great service actually: now you can also charge to 100% without any risks to damage the battery prematurely.
Depends on whether the extra capacity is left unused at the top (undercharged), unusable at the bottom (large hidden capacity), somewhere in the middle, or through disabling (or removing) entire subpacks.
 

ucmndd

Well-Known Member
Mar 10, 2016
7,650
14,881
California
Depends on whether the extra capacity is left unused at the top (undercharged), unusable at the bottom (large hidden capacity), somewhere in the middle, or through disabling (or removing) entire subpacks.
Every single example of Tesla software-based capacity limitation to date has been a simple top lock. There's zero reason to speculate that it would be something different. It's the simplest to implement and the best for the battery.
 
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After 150K miles, my original-owner 2014 MS85 HV battery failed. Thankfully I had 3 months left on my battery warranty so my estimated cost to replace is $0 (whew!). Meanwhile I was told it will take 6 weeks, so what are the latest offerings for an 85 battery replacement? Anyone out there with a 2014 battery recently swapped out? The SC rep in Seattle didn't know, telling me simply that a replacement HV wasn't in stock. They also loaned me a Model 3 for the entire 6 weeks, so I feel like Tesla is honestly taking care of me.

Threads on this forum speak of other owners with failed batteries receiving refurbished or new packs, and some threads speak of upgrades for no cost or a small additional cost. My drive unit has also never been replaced, so wondering if I should preemptively ask for a new drive unit or wait for that to fail as well? I guess I'd rather keep my car especially if I get some added range (pano roof and free supercharging my reasons) plus I'd rather not buy a new car if the one I have works fine, but I'm also unsure EVs are the future if so many battery pack fail after only 6 or 7 years and the cost to replace them out of warranty is so expensive.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,276
8,961
Boise, ID
so what are the latest offerings for an 85 battery replacement?
New or refurbished. Those are the choices you will have. The refurbished is running around 10 or 12 thousand dollars these days. The new is about $22K I think? And as @ucmndd mentioned, the refurbished option is whatever Tesla is doing for refurbished batteries at the moment.

My drive unit has also never been replaced, so wondering if I should preemptively ask for a new drive unit or wait for that to fail as well?
Huh. I thought they had gone through the whole fleet by now, replacing those drive units because of the whining noise that developed from the pitted metal bearings. I also have a 2014 S85 like yours, and when mine started developing the noise some, I called attention to it the first time, and they said, something to the effect of, "Yeah, a little, but it's not out of line yet." And then when I went for an annual service a year or two later, without my even mentioning it, they contacted me and said they noticed it and were replacing the drive unit.

but I'm also unsure EVs are the future if so many battery pack fail after only 6 or 7 years
This is ludicrous. You are falling victim to the "man bites dog" fallacy. EV cars have a few fires, and EVERY SINGLE ONE get massive news coverage all over the place! And so people think they are some huge massive problem, even though gas cars catch fire hundreds of times a day, but it's so commonplace, it doesn't even make the news anymore. Same here with the batteries. You've seen some threads of battery failures here on a Tesla owners club forum, where the really involved obsessed owners go, and you think it's a massive widespread problem. There are many tens of thousands of owners without any problems who don't seek out this site and create accounts on this forum to create threads just to say, "My battery is fine." So you are being fooled by selection bias--only the people with problems are going to talk about it, so that's all the news you see and think it's commonplace.
 

SageBrush

REJECT Fascism
May 7, 2015
12,895
17,223
New Mexico
You are falling victim to the "man bites dog" fallacy.

It also supports his narrative that Tesla should make his car new.

I am curious about one thing though: if he buys a new pack, what does he get (unlocked and locked) ?
If e.g. he is supplied a 100 kWh pack with 70 kWh usable for $22k less whatever the warranty is worth, that is a darned good deal.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
7,276
8,961
Boise, ID
I am curious about one thing though: if he buys a new pack, what does he get (unlocked and locked) ?
If e.g. he is supplied a 100 kWh pack with 70 kWh usable for $22k less whatever the warranty is worth, that is a darned good deal.
From several of the threads I've seen, they seem to have a pretty common replacement pack that they use for these old 85s. Instead of the older ones having 400V, these are a 350V, but have a better, higher charging curve that doesn't taper as much, so seems to have better performance. And I don't think they are 100 kWh size, but are around 90 and capped down just little bit to get them near that 80-ish level that the old "85" batteries had.
 
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