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My overly-paranoid roadtrip charging setup - should I grab anything else?

Pictured:
  • TT-30 to 14-30 pigtail adapter
  • 10-50 to 14-50 adapter
  • 6-50 to 14-50 adapter
  • 5-20 connector
  • 5-15 connector (the one that comes w/ the car)
  • 14-50 connector
  • 50ft 12-gauge outdoor extension cord (regular 5-15 plug)
  • CHAdeMO adapter - unopened, may return back to Tesla or sell it if an official CCS adapter is being released soon.
Not pictured (arriving later this week):
  • 14-30 connector
  • 10-30 connector

adapters.jpg



Amazingly, this all fits in the smaller subtrunk area where the mobile charging bag usually sits.

I know I'm being overly paranoid will all of these adapters, but as the saying goes: "better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it".

Are there any other adapters I should be adding to my collection?
 
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jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,857
3,942
Maryland
You should definitely bring the SAE J1772 adapter that you should have received with the Tesla vehicle. That one is quite useful for charging away from home, when stopping for a meal or overnight at a hotel/motel that may have a public Level 2 charging station nearby. Check for EV charging locations on Google Maps, also install the Plugshare app on your phone.

Make sure that your Tesla account is up to date with a current credit card on file. Otherwise you will not be able to use a Supercharger.

Unless you are planning on staying at a campground you won't need the TT-30 or the 14-50 adapters. The 5-20 is redundant with the universal 5-15 (a bit slower than the 5-20.)

Unless you are staying at homes and know that the laundry dryer is located right next to the garage you probably don't need the 10-30 or 14-30.

You should test the CHAdeMO adapter; also verify that it has the latest firmware installed (if not then your Tesla Service Center can update the firmware in the CHAdeMO adapter.)
 
Last edited:
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You should definitely bring the SAE J1772 adapter that you should have received with the Tesla vehicle. That one is quite useful for charging away from home, when stopping for a meal or overnight at a hotel/motel that may have a public Level 2 charger nearby. Check for EV charging locations on Google Maps, also install the Plugshare app on your phone.
Whoops, it's in the mobile connector bag, I just didn't think to list it. So far, that adapter is the only thing I have used out of everything pictured since we have a few free L2 chargers near my house.
 
Where are you planning to travel?
The Home Depot about 5 miles away.


In reality, these aren't for any upcoming planned trip, just to be prepared for whatever situation we might encounter. The 10-50 to 14-50 adapter is for my in-laws house where they have that as an option. The TT-30 to 14-30 is in case we need to top off at a camp site for some reason. The CHAdeMO was sort of a panic buy when they went in stock a final time, but I figure it's nice to have.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,857
3,942
Maryland
Is it me or this is a real inconvenient driving a Tesla?
No. It may be inconvenient to charge a Tesla depending on where you go. In most situations you only need to be within driving range of a Supercharger. Where this is not possible then there are other charging options. The SAE J1772 adapter is very useful, should always be in the Tesla vehicle so you can charge at any level 2 charging station. The Tesla Mobile Connector enables you to charge from any standard outlet, slowly, at 3 to 4 miles of range added per hour. If you travel to a cabin you can charge overnight or longer from any grounded 120V receptacle and you should be good to go for the start of the return trip, until you can get to a Supercharger. An extension cord would be a good thing to bring just in case you need it. In some parts of the US and Canada it may be convenient to have the CHAdeMO adapter so you can charge your Tesla vehicle.
 

Silicon Desert

Active Member
Oct 1, 2018
3,677
3,791
Sparks, / GF1
You should definitely bring the SAE J1772 adapter that you should have received with the Tesla vehicle. That one is quite useful for charging away from home, when stopping for a meal or overnight at a hotel/motel that may have a public Level 2 charging station nearby. Check for EV charging locations on Google Maps, also install the Plugshare app on your phone.

Make sure that your Tesla account is up to date with a current credit card on file. Otherwise you will not be able to use a Supercharger.

Unless you are planning on staying at a campground you won't need the TT-30 or the 14-50 adapters. The 5-20 is redundant with the universal 5-15 (a bit slower than the 5-20.)

Unless you are staying at homes and know that the laundry dryer is located right next to the garage you probably don't need the 10-30 or 14-30.

You should test the CHAdeMO adapter; also verify that it has the latest firmware installed (if not then your Tesla Service Center can update the firmware in the CHAdeMO adapter.)
That's great information for the OP.
I travel ALL over the USA and I have never needed a CHAdeMO adapter, and a good thing since I don't have one. I'd sell it. It takes up too much space anyway.
 
The real reason for the paranoia is the stretch between Duluth, MN and Lutsen, MN in the middle of winter for an annual ski trip we take. There is a CCS/CHAdeMO L3 charger at Lutsen and a few L2 chargers, but not many. I’ll likely be able to plug into a L2 at some point during the stay, but having the CHAdeMO as an option is a nice backup plan. Around the Twin Cities there is no reason for me to use any of these.

This is my first EV and I’m just very unfamiliar with what I’ll encounter (especially when the temp drops to -10 or below). These adapters, save for the CHAdeMO, were cheap and fit easily in the trunk - why not carry them around?
 
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MY-user

MYLR, 5s, OD9/10, received on Nov. 29.
Sep 15, 2021
195
136
Colorado
Pictured:
  • TT-30 to 14-30 pigtail adapter
  • 10-50 to 14-50 adapter
  • 6-50 to 14-50 adapter
  • 5-20 connector
  • 5-15 connector (the one that comes w/ the car)
  • 14-50 connector
  • 50ft 12-gauge outdoor extension cord (regular 5-15 plug)
  • CHAdeMO adapter - unopened, may return back to Tesla or sell it if an official CCS adapter is being released soon.
Not pictured (arriving later this week):
  • 14-30 connector
  • 10-30 connector

View attachment 722644


Amazingly, this all fits in the smaller subtrunk area where the mobile charging bag usually sits.

I know I'm being overly paranoid will all of these adapters, but as the saying goes: "better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it".

Are there any other adapters I should be adding to my collection?
You are still missing a long pole with a hook and a flax capacitor to convert 1.21 Gigawatts of lightning strike power into usable energy 😁
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,857
3,942
Maryland
I was going to suggest a tow cable. If your Tesla is towed behind another vehicle this will recharge the battery. (Not recommended except in an emergency.) In the video the Model X is towed for 25 miles at 70 MPH. The battery state of charge was 14% at the start of the tow and 55% at the end. Estimated power sent to the battery was ~65kW while being towed at 70 MPH. The tow vehicle, a Mercedes sedan, was consuming fuel at 5 miles per gallon during the test.

 

MY-user

MYLR, 5s, OD9/10, received on Nov. 29.
Sep 15, 2021
195
136
Colorado
I was going to suggest a tow cable. If your Tesla is towed behind another vehicle this will recharge the battery. (Not recommended except in an emergency.) In the video the Model X is towed for 25 miles at 70 MPH. The battery state of charge was 14% at the start of the tow and 55% at the end. Estimated power sent to the battery was ~65kW while being towed at 70 MPH. The tow vehicle, a Mercedes sedan, was consuming fuel at 5 miles per gallon during the test.

This is incredible! I didn't know know Teslas could do this. I wonder what official Tesla recommendation would be.
 
I just travelled from Nevada to Florida to S. Carolina and back with nothing but the Mobile Connector and J1772 and never used either of them. I was more concerned with packing a squeegee and spray bottle of washer fluid to clean the windshield at Superchargers.
We did pick up a rock that put a baseball size crack in the windshield on Day one but I found a guy in Amarillo to stabilize it with some epoxy so we could continue the trip.
 

Twiglett

Single pedal driver
Oct 3, 2014
3,140
3,299
Austin
Pictured:
  • TT-30 to 14-30 pigtail adapter
  • 10-50 to 14-50 adapter
  • 6-50 to 14-50 adapter
  • 5-20 connector
  • 5-15 connector (the one that comes w/ the car)
  • 14-50 connector
  • 50ft 12-gauge outdoor extension cord (regular 5-15 plug)
  • CHAdeMO adapter - unopened, may return back to Tesla or sell it if an official CCS adapter is being released soon.
Not pictured (arriving later this week):
  • 14-30 connector
  • 10-30 connector

View attachment 722644


Amazingly, this all fits in the smaller subtrunk area where the mobile charging bag usually sits.

I know I'm being overly paranoid will all of these adapters, but as the saying goes: "better to have it and not need it than to need it and not have it".

Are there any other adapters I should be adding to my collection?
almost 50k miles, lots of road trips and only ever used J1772 adapter, the std 15A (& 14-50) mobile connector apart from the usual destination chargers and SCs.
Main thing is lots of abetterrouteplanner.com and PlugShare beforehand.
As a caution - some of the plugs you have listed there (like the TT-30) is that they have caveats that mean you really have to test them prior to relying on them as the only option. Especially TT-30, its easy to get a physical adapter that you won't be able to charge from.

However a suggestion for you that may well help your flexibility. Instead of using the 5-15 extension use a 14-50 extension cord of whatever length you feel you need.
Then use the mobile connector with 14-50 -> 14-50 extension -> 14-50 -> <whatever> adapter on the end of that. That mean the adapters with work with or without the extension cord.
Its a bit more expensive, but does mean its easier for you to get connected to house bound dryer/cooker sockets and still get the full power.

When you do it that way round you get the flexibility of a long cable reach without needing lots of extra adapters.
Just remember to drop the charging amps ;)

[edit]
This is the kind of setup I was trying to explain. This one is pricey but self contained.

Or maybe just add a Conntek 14-50 extension as you already have some adapters
 
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