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Tesla Model 3 vs BMW 3-series - a personal view

DaveW

Active Member
May 21, 2019
1,153
915
Beds, UK
The only thing I find odd in the replies on the f30 forum, is the "Don't want an EV, as I wouldn't want a car that doesn't excite me" - Go drive a Performance Model 3 and tell me that again :D

My last car was a fun BMW (M140i - great little car!) and the Model 3 is a lot more exciting when I want it to be! If you've got a non M or M-Lite BMW there's little to be excited about really, just nice cars to sit in and drive :)
 
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interbear

Member
May 27, 2019
697
592
Monmouthshire, UK
I'd also add that the service booking experience via the Tesla app is seamless and, in my opinion, better than the standard ICE approach of calling a dealer. Document the issue, select a time, done. Then Tesla text back for further info ie. upload photos via the app. Done. I like it.
 

VanillaAir_UK

Supporting Member
Jun 17, 2019
7,303
4,803
Surrey, UK
Cannot find how to do anything remotely non standard like booking a second schedule, amending an existing one or adding more than half dozen lines to a request.
 
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pgkevet

Active Member
Jul 1, 2019
1,151
1,003
mid wales
My personal experience Sytner BMW Leicester was the opposite, I can say with confidence the stuck up, arrogant nature of the staff there has put me off buying another BMW ever again..

Car dealerships and I have a long history. Around the shrewbury area they are all pretty decent- polite, coffee, let you mess about in the showroom etc but back when i worked in Sth London they were all a bunch of arrogant tosspots and i walked out of many of them. I used to turn up for car shopping wearing my oldest tat and unshaven and drive one of my aged cars.

One classic encounter at Nissan:
N "Can I have your name, please"
Me "Mr Kxxxxxx"
N "And your Christain name, Mr K"
Me "Oh, why do you need that?"
N "So I know how to address you."
Me " I'm the customer, you address me as Sir."
N "And how much did Sir want to spend?"
Me "Sir doesn't want to spend anything but Sir needs a new nice car that i fit in so show me that 300z"

I was totally ignored in one Merc dealership so finally walked up to a salesman and asked if they actualy wanted to sell cars- 'cos they;d just lost a customer. I then went to another merc dealership 20 miles away and the attitude was entirely different - couldn't be more helpful, let me burn rubber on a C class coupe, slide it round corners etc and totally unfazed - as it should be (I should add we were in approriately quiet surroundings during school hours).

Best was a hyundai dealership - OH half liked the showroom model 'cos it was a pretty purple. Salesman told me that was a special order job that takes weeks to get. When i pointed out they had one there and I had cash we collected it the next day.
 

Avendit

Member
Apr 18, 2019
763
493
EDI
The VED increase would not work since it would have to be set so high that low mileage users would be priced out of cars altogether since they would be subsidising high mileage users. It has to be a system based on use such as amount of electricity or distance travelled.

I think a yearly assessment of miles driven based off the MOT might be viable. Hopefully with different ramps for ICE and EV. But from an environmental basis we would have to break with tradition and apply this retrospectively for once. If you drive a small engined ICE it should be affordable, if you drive an EV it should be affordable. If you drive a big/fun ICE it should be acceptable up to a few 1000 miles each year then start getting hurty. Combined this would allow people to keep an ICE as a hobby, or if they struggle to finance a new car while punishing those that keep running big engined cars as their daily driver.

@pdk42 Great writeup, although I would disagree on your statement about the Model 3 beating the M3 in all performance categories. It absolutely wins the ones you list, but they favor the tesla. Just looking at the top gear comparison, if the drag had been longer the M3 would have won - it was going much faster at the 1/4 mile than the model 3 was. They used time rather than distance for the 0-100-0, and again had they gone to 120 or 140 I suspect the M3 would have won out. On the track the tesla was faster, but that was a short tight track favoring the AWD and insti-torque of the model 3. Try a bigger track with more straight, or an RS4 with AWD, and the Model 3 would have been struggling more. Not to lessen the impact of, or my love for my P-, but I don't think its quite the clean sweep some make it out to be, given different tests. Where a Model 3 is a daily car with stunning capability, I think as a track toy or weekend warrior you would have to consider (possibly the last ever generation of) fun ICE - they still get the fun on the tarmac in ways the Model 3 tries to make up for with fart mode.

Everyone is going to hate me for this aren't they? do think its honest assessment tho.
 
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pdk42

Active Member
Jul 17, 2019
1,035
1,019
Leamington
@pdk42 Great writeup, although I would disagree on your statement about the Model 3 beating the M3 in all performance categories. It absolutely wins the ones you list, but they favor the tesla. Just looking at the top gear comparison, if the drag had been longer the M3 would have won - it was going much faster at the 1/4 mile than the model 3 was. They used time rather than distance for the 0-100-0, and again had they gone to 120 or 140 I suspect the M3 would have won out. On the track the tesla was faster, but that was a short tight track favoring the AWD and insti-torque of the model 3. Try a bigger track with more straight, or an RS4 with AWD, and the Model 3 would have been struggling more. Not to lessen the impact of, or my love for my P-, but I don't think its quite the clean sweep some make it out to be, given different tests. Where a Model 3 is a daily car with stunning capability, I think as a track toy or weekend warrior you would have to consider (possibly the last ever generation of) fun ICE - they still get the fun on the tarmac in ways the Model 3 tries to make up for with fart mode.

Everyone is going to hate me for this aren't they? do think its honest assessment tho.
I total agree with you. I don't think I'd want a Model 3 as a track car, even with it's power and response. It's just too heavy.
 
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pdk42

Active Member
Jul 17, 2019
1,035
1,019
Leamington
Not my experience. Brilliant after sales service, loaned a Model S whilst my car was being attended to. Updates during the process, quality fixes (both paint and alignment issues). Could not have asked for better.
Well, that wasn't the complete context of what I was accusing of being smelly. Wider quote:

I can’t think of anyone who’s bought a Model 3 who is anything but critical of the whole purchase, delivery and after-sales service model. Frankly it stinks.
 

browellm

Member
Oct 4, 2019
401
355
Notts
The only thing I find odd in the replies on the f30 forum, is the "Don't want an EV, as I wouldn't want a car that doesn't excite me" - Go drive a Performance Model 3 and tell me that again :D

My last car was a fun BMW (M140i - great little car!) and the Model 3 is a lot more exciting when I want it to be! If you've got a non M or M-Lite BMW there's little to be excited about really, just nice cars to sit in and drive :)

Just wanted to say what a great post this is and having lurked here for a couple of weeks, this prompted me to register. I'm in the same boat as I currently have a '63 plate F31 330d. I too am strongly considering an M3P in the next 12 months and see the same upsides/share the same concerns as you had.
 

browellm

Member
Oct 4, 2019
401
355
Notts
Just wanted to say what a great post this is and having lurked here for a couple of weeks, this prompted me to register. I'm in the same boat as I currently have a '63 plate F31 330d. I too am strongly considering an M3P in the next 12 months and see the same upsides/share the same concerns as you had.
I posted this over on the UK f30 forum (f30 is the just-recently-replaced 3-series). I thought some of you here might be interested in it too...

I promised over on another thread to give you all a write up on the Model 3 that I've just received.

I tried to do the usual quick review, but the problem is that comparing a BMW 3-series to a Tesla Model 3 is not an easy comparison. They are quite different cars and a simple A/B comparison really doesn’t work. The problem is that the BMW is, IMHO, the high water mark of the affordable, quality ICE (Internal Combustion Engine) car; whilst the Model 3 is the first, quality EV that gets close to doing what a BMW does for most of us.

So, I’ve ended up writing an epic – sorry. Read on if you want…

My love affair with BMW

I’ve had a BMW since 2006. The list has been: e46 330d coupe, f11 530d estate, f31 330d estate, and f31 335i estate. I’ve been very happy with the brand. The dealerships are excellent overall; the cars are a fantastic blend of price, features, performance, quality and style; the service network is first rate; and I’ve never been let down by any of the cars I’ve owned. I came from a succession of Audis and my wife has a VW Golf that she loves, so I have a soft spot for VAG too. But I never contemplated going back to Audi after the 330Cd. Merc, Volvo, Jag etc never interested me. Their brands don’t match my own “branding” () and their cars never seemed to offer anything over a BMW. I thought I’d never leave BMW.

Tesla Insanity

So, why the Tesla? As anyone who’s even casually looked into how Tesla operate, especially since the launch of the Model 3, the decision might be viewed as a bit insane. For your £50k you get the privilege of self-service on-line ordering only (like buying an iPhone); vague and unrealistic delivery dates; zero communication on order progress; chaotic and rushed handover; minimal PDI; questionable after-sales service based on “service centres” of which there are precisely 10 today in the UK (forget the idea of the local dealership); and to top it all, a service model that disempowers the customer via an app-centric request system that tries its best to prevent you talking to a real human.

And all that’s before you start getting spooked by endless stories of poor paint quality, bad panel alignment, leaking doors and boot lids, lights that fog up, and a long list of other complaints that even a brief scan of the various Tesla forums will reveal. Then if all that isn’t enough there’s range anxiety.

But EVs are the Future

If all that sounds pretty negative, then I concur. I cancelled one order before reversing my decision. But I stuck it out and actually I’m very glad I did.
The essential point is this – EVs are the future. Once you get your head around EVs you realise that the ICE is yesterday’s technology. After my first drive in a Tesla I got back into my 335i and my immediate thought was “wow - all this noise, vibration, fumes, gear-changing, turbo lag, heat, torque converter slip, etc etc is just sooooo clunky”. An electric drivetrain gives instant torque and power, is near silent, is way more efficient, and it’s an order of magnitude less complex mechanically. If you were to invent the car today and had access to current battery and charging technology, deciding to build an ICE car wouldn’t even enter your head. And this is before you look at the environmental benefits.

The Environmental Argument

I’m no eco freak, but I’ve got a science background and am totally convinced by the global warming hypothesis. I’m equally convinced that air quality is a massive hidden health issue in nearly all our towns and cities. If you believe those two points, then it’s hard not to look to EVs. EVs reduce tailpipe emissions to zero and that’s a big deal for air quality. Particulates are a massive contributor to a range of health issues. And beyond the tailpipe, there’s the CO2 emissions. Some people will try to convince you that the life-time CO2 costs of EVs are no better than ICE cars. But actually, every properly-conducted study shows that this is just plain wrong. If you look at total CO2 use over a car’s lifetime – so including the energy needed to produce the raw materials, manufacture the car, produce the car’s fuel, and finally to dispose of it – EVs typically consume a quarter or less of the CO2 compared to ICE cars. That’s a long way from zero emissions, but it’s a massive step nonetheless.

Convinced by the EV Drivetrain

So, I’m now personally convinced by the EV drivetrain – for reasons of driveability, maintenance costs, and environmental impact. It also makes economic sense. BIK from April will be 0% and there’s also a scheme to use a salary sacrifice if you don’t run a company-provided car. In Scotland there’s a £30k interest-free loan and if Jezzer gets into power, we’ll have the same in England and Wales. Then in terms of running costs, an EV beats the pants off an ICE. If you charge at home, fuel costs are as low as a tenth of a car like the 335i. Even with a mix of home and public charging, it’ll still be much, much cheaper than petrol or diesel. And with a much simpler mechanical design service costs are much lower too.

The Tesla Charging Network is as Important as the Cars

Wanting an EV doesn’t immediately lead to wanting to buy a Tesla though – there are, after all, plenty of other EVs out there. That true, but all aside Tesla have a massive disadvantage – a completely dysfunctional public charging network. I can’t even begin to describe the mess we’re in. We’ve got about 50 independent operators out there, many requiring you to have an account and access card, some needing a monthly subscription. Then the reliability is diabolical. It’s fairly common to arrive at a charger and find that it’s not working.

Recent legislative changes are pushing all operators to accept regular contactless payment cards – but that often comes with a sting in the tail of higher prices. BP Chargemaster for instance will charge you 40p per unit at one of their 150kW fast chargers – that’s about 10x the price of overnight domestic electricity and 2x the cost if you have an account with them. That’s daylight robbery. And finally, many public chargers are down at glacial charge speeds – 7kW mostly - that’ll give you about 25 miles/hr of charge. A Tesla supercharger is typically 150kW with new generation chargers coming on stream soon at 250kW. Today I get about 300 miles per hour charge rate on my Model 3.

The good news is that these problems are gradually being shaken out – with new entrants such as Ionity (a JV between BMW, Ford, Merc Benz and VAG) pushing things along. Hopefully, that’ll force some of the current crappy operators like Ecotricity to either measure up or give up.

In the meantime though, Tesla’s charging network remains the only viable solution if you want an EV as a replacement vehicle that does more than potter around within its range from your house. So, as of Oct 2019, the iPace, eTron, Mercedes EQC, etc are marginal at best as ICE car replacements. The range and charging infrastructure just isn’t there yet.

If you want more than a local runabout, it has to be a Tesla

If you’re still with me, you can see that if you want an EV today that can do sensible distances, Tesla is really the only option. But it shouldn’t be viewed as a Hobson’s choice purchase. Any current Tesla has a lot more going for it than just “the only viable EV available today”. The Model 3 in particular is actually a great car in its own right. It’s fast, comfortable, drives well, is loaded with tech, and pretty desirable as a brand and a vehicle.

What’s not to like? Well, there’s all the things I listed at the start. Tesla’s service model is clearly trying to disrupt, but my own view is that they’ve gone too far. I can’t think of anyone who’s bought a Model 3 who is anything but critical of the whole purchase, delivery and after-sales service model. Frankly it stinks and if the established players ever get round to building a competitive car and have the charging network to support it, then they’ll eat Tesla for breakfast. This is clearly a long-term concern if you’re buying into the brand. However, the success of the Model 3 (I reckon it’ll be the UK’s top-selling car in Sept 2019), clearly shows that the right product will attract the buyers. We are at a tipping point in EV sales.

Some BMW 3 / Tesla Model Comparisons

So, to the specifics – how does a Model 3 compare to an f31 BMW 335i? Well, here goes…

- The BMW is better built, has a better quality interior, a better service model from pre-sales to after-sales, and delivers an excellent overall ownership experience. But it’s old tech and once you’ve bitten off the EV tree, you’ll never go back. The current BMW range probably represents the high summit of the ICE art. You could say that it’s its swansong.

- In the areas where BMW excel, the Tesla basically measures up as “good enough” - except for the service model where, frankly, you just need to grit your teeth and hope you don’t need to use it! This sounds overly negative I know, but it’s an honest assessment. It’s an expensive car but it doesn’t feel as premium inside as, say, the new G20. It’s certainly better than a Renault or a Nissan, but it’s not a BMW or an Audi. It’s not far behind, but it’s still behind. Sure there are interior things that the Model 3 delivers that are very nice – things like the huge glass roof and the stunningly-good sound system, so it’s actually a nice place to be – but I keep thinking that BMW would have done it better.

- However, the Tesla excels in areas where the BMW just can’t reach. I’m talking of the EV drivetrain with its refinement, instant torque and power; the tech (autopilot, “full” self-driving, big touch-screen UI, integrated streaming services, first-rate remote app support); and the running costs.

- The Tesla is not a driver’s car in the same way as a well-setup BMW is. It’s too heavy for that and the AWD nowhere near as playful as a nice RWD 3-series. But the track tests show that the Model Performance will best the BMW M3 in all categories – by quite a margin. Faster 0-60. Faster 0-100-0. Faster around a circuit. And it’s cheaper. Personally, I don’t do track days but if I did I think I’d prefer a nice E90 M3 with its delightful V8 engine.

- As a day-to-day car though – the Tesla is way more than good enough and in some areas is superior. The tech is better, it rides better, it’s quieter, the sound system is better and it’s more comfortable. It also pollutes less, is cheaper to run and just brings a few more smiles to the face.

- But what of the claimed Tesla Model 3 build quality issues? Spend more than a minute on the web and you’ll find a lot of complaints about paint and build quality issues. I was personally very concerned but in fact, the car I have is pretty good. The paint in general is fine (but I have pearlescent white which is excellent at hiding surface imperfections). There’s a little missing top-coat on the insides of the front wings in the door jambs, but it doesn’t bother me. Panel alignment is pretty good too. There’s a slight asymmetry in the front bumper fit, but it’s not much and again I can live with it. Maybe others wouldn’t - we all have our own OCD levels. Door and boot alignment is spot on, as is the glazing. There’s certainly nothing on my car that would get most people worked up about. However, as I said above, I’m pretty sure that a BMW would be just that little bit better. Neither would be perfect – they’re both mass-produced cars – but it’s clear to me that BMW have more experience and expertise in the art.

In Summary

In summary – I’m very happy to have made the switch. The car is definitely the first step on the road to the next generation and it makes any ICE car seem dated. I just wish that this was a BMW Model 3 EV – I’d be beating the door of the dealership down to buy it!

And in fact, I think that BMW have, a bit late, realised this. I expect to see a Model 3 competitor from BMW by 2022 by which time the Ionity network will be in place and then we’ll see if Tesla can continue to succeed. They’ll have to up their game significantly on their service offering and build quality to survive. But right now they have 2-3 years lead on any EV competitor.

So, as of Oct 2019, if you want a quality EV car that will replace your 3-series, then get a Tesla Model 3.

And finally, the obligatory pickup shot:


Model3Pickup
by Paul Kaye, on Flickr

Sorry, it was the OP I meant to reply to. First-time forum user fail!
 
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MOBB

Member
Sep 18, 2019
161
122
Bedfordshire
This is an interesting thread for me, as my situation is I drive a CLS63 AMG which is fantastic, and we have just started leasing a Model 3 performance for my wife to drive - I drive it now and then.

I was convinced that I could not live without the visceral experience of driving the AMG but so far the Tesla makes so much sense, and I genuinely look forward to driving it, not just because of the mental acceleration either.

EV's work perfectly for both of us as most of our journeys are under 50 miles. There is of course a huge saving to be had at the moment with running costs and BIK rates, but I am under no illusion that this is short term as someone mentioned above.

I think I will leave it as is for a month or so and reflect, but I am so impressed with the Tesla
 

Beady3647

Member
Nov 3, 2017
230
156
Solihull
pdk42

I have to say that I agree with quite a lot of what you say. I'm impressed by the number of 'converts' to Tesla from BMW, Merc etc - I have owned both marques for 30 years plus.

My own experiences of Birmingham SC have been nothing short of excellent, so no gripes from me on that score. I am currently on my second model S and although I have superlative performance available, I find myself using it infrequently. Both my cars have been every bit as satisfactory in their build as my previous 15 or so BM & MB. I agree that the interior is sparse but that is a feature that has grown on me. I do occasionally drive an ICE and I can't wait to hand it back and return to a far more relaxed environment.

When one considers what Tesla has brought to the table as a comparative 'start-up' I'm personally amazed how long it's taking the ICE makers to adjust. I believe that it may quite possibly be another 8 - 10 years before Tesla will be considered 'just another EV'. For instance how come nobody (to my knowledge) has incorporated OTA updates?

There are, of course, probably many improvements that could be made. One that I would particularly like to see is voice command on 'instrument' adjustment such as heating/aircon. I'm sure there are many others that would give more pleasure to other owners.

Perhaps I'm easy to please. but I have to say that there are remarkably few owners that I have heard that would go back to an ICE or even change to a different EV.

IMHO Tesla is pretty much the ultimate drive - l expect it will lead the chase for a few years yet!
 
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vitesse

Active Member
Apr 2, 2019
1,021
285
Hertfordshire (UK)
I agree with you on this. But I'm hopeful that Tesla will change; but they can't leave it until the competition really starts to bite - because their reputation will be shot if they wait that long.
Most of the bad feedback I see is regarding car ordering and delivery. Some moan that the after sales service isn't as good as some premium brands but they are kind of missing the point - Tesla cars are expensive not because they have large margins that can be easily reinvested into customer service, these cars are expensive to make and the company is expanding fast and so not making a profit. Tesla reminds me of Amazon in the early days. Nevertheless, my experience with after sales service is actually very good.

The company is also in a steep part of the growth curve production-wise and deliveries here in the UK are massively up in just the last couple of months thanks to the start of M3 deliveries fulfilling back-orders. The company is coping with almost overwhelming throughput compared to what it's used to.

There is plenty of evidence that the app-based customer support system is evolving. Once you get to the service centre you aren't met by robots - the human element there is alive and well, as demonstrated by my visit for a relatively minor job at my SC this morning.

But yes, the company needs to respond to feedback to survive but I can't think of a car manufacturer that is more able to by its very nature. As they say, only time will tell.
 

SR22pilot

Member
Jun 16, 2014
720
1,111
Georgia
One of the things a lot of people miss is the real advantage of the UI. Going to a Tesla (especially Model 3) is like going from a flip phone to an iPhone. Recently, some old line auto makers have introduced over the air updates. However, their efforts are like introducing a Blackberry after the iPhone is out. They still have dedicated buttons and tiny (if sometimes multiple) screens. After one year of ownership, my car has changed massively. The UI is very different. The single large screen has allowed that to happen. The buttons on the wheel do things they didn't do when I got the car. Nav instructions are on the other side of the screen now so they are closer. It now renders oncoming traffic. Heck, when I got it there wasn't traffic display. Oh yeah, how about Sentry mode. Dog mode. Games. Well you get the idea. Until you have watched your car evolve over a year you don't fully comprehend the difference. I get excited with each new release. I never felt this way about a car before.

On Quora someone, being derogatory, said Tesla owners remind him of early iPhone owners. He said the iPhone owners only praised the phone despite horrible AT&T data rates and service. I think he is correct but he misses the point. I fell in love with the iPhone because it could render regular web sites. My Windows Mobile phone only worked on sites written just for it. The iPhone used a finger instead of a stylus. Everything seemed so well integrated. I didn't think about data rates because other phones couldn't even begin to surf the web. I find my Model 3 is that way. It has issues but it is so ahead overall that I don't think about them when talking to others about the car. Going back to an ICE car seems like a trip back in time.

I bought my Model 3 because it is an awesome car. On Quora there was a question as to what are things no one tells you about owning a Tesla. One owner replied that Tesla owners don't want to admit it but every time they drive they get mad at other drivers spewing toxins into the air that the Tesla driver is forced to breathe. He is so correct. I don't want to admit it. I don't want to be that angry environmentalist. I got my Tesla because it is a great car - period. Still, I keep thinking that if exhaust gas was red, we would all be driving in a red smog. Then we would realize the crap we are breathing.
 

rwjr44

Member
Nov 16, 2018
11
4
Hampton, VA
A few months I drove 100 miles (one way) to test drive a M3. The drive went well except the there was a pronounced wind noise from the driver's front window above ~60 mph. The problem was that the salesman wasn't at all concerned and didn't indicate that it could be fixed. I also wasn't impressed by the spartan interior. I WAS impressed by the driving experience. After the test drive I "walked the lot" and noticed that over half of the cars had some body damage. The salesman said that they would be fixed after a sale :(. I was not impressed by the salesman or other people at that center and I took the time to speak with a few.

When I entered (to return home) my car (BMW 228i), my overriding thought was that it was now obsolete technologically but that I would keep it and continue to enjoy it until either there were other EV options or Tesla improved its service and customer experience. These are things that are very important to me. I've owned a good number of cars over the years, some excellent and a few clunkers (poor or no dealership, no corporate support, etc.). I still vividly remember the clunkers.

I deeply appreciate the tremendous effort it is to start a new car business. I admire Mr. Tesla for his accomplishment but I don't YET have the inclination to take a chance with the people and service side of his business.
 

pdk42

Active Member
Jul 17, 2019
1,035
1,019
Leamington
A few months I drove 100 miles (one way) to test drive a M3. The drive went well except the there was a pronounced wind noise from the driver's front window above ~60 mph. The problem was that the salesman wasn't at all concerned and didn't indicate that it could be fixed. I also wasn't impressed by the spartan interior. I WAS impressed by the driving experience. After the test drive I "walked the lot" and noticed that over half of the cars had some body damage. The salesman said that they would be fixed after a sale :(. I was not impressed by the salesman or other people at that center and I took the time to speak with a few.

When I entered (to return home) my car (BMW 228i), my overriding thought was that it was now obsolete technologically but that I would keep it and continue to enjoy it until either there were other EV options or Tesla improved its service and customer experience. These are things that are very important to me. I've owned a good number of cars over the years, some excellent and a few clunkers (poor or no dealership, no corporate support, etc.). I still vividly remember the clunkers.

I deeply appreciate the tremendous effort it is to start a new car business. I admire Mr. Tesla for his accomplishment but I don't YET have the inclination to take a chance with the people and service side of his business.
I can understand and agree with a lot of what you say here. The Model 3 is a good effort, but it doesn't yet match the best that BMW or Audi can build with regard to fit, finish, interior ambience/quality, build quality, cabin sound insulation etc. And of course the service offering - from pre-sales to after sales is a long way behind. However, I'm still of the view that as a complete package it's still a better proposition than any ICE car. Whether that statement will stand the test of time is without doubt the $64,000 question!
 

gangzoom

Active Member
May 22, 2014
1,203
1,017
Uk
And of course the service offering - from pre-sales to after sales is a long way behind.

I have to 100% disagree with that, been a previous BMW owner and we bought my wife a brand new Lexus, my personal experience is the Tesla pre sale and after sale support in the UK is leagues better than anything I experienced with BMW which is worse than Nissan, and even better than the service we got from Lexus.

Maybe things have changed since we took delivery but I simply don't recognize the description some people portray Tesla customer service. All my experience with Tesla customer service has been top class.
 

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