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Tesla Semi delivery event, 1 December 2022

advocate8

Active Member
Nov 12, 2019
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Maryland
This truck is a beast! Big issue I see is what happens when something breaks while on the road? It’s going to take along time to train mechanics to fix and have spare parts on hand… time is money for truckers.
This is a key point and will affect the adoption rate by trucking companies.... along with charging network.
It seems really really likely though Tesla will have a quick response mobile service team set up that can deal with things quickly. At least for the short term while there isn’t a huge volume of semis on the road. Later, when there are substantial numbers, it will get tougher. Inevitably it will help that the semi has substantially fewer moving parts than diesel trucks.
Tesla does have a lot of experience with mobile service it can put into play here early though.
Likely there will be more problems with the trucks early, then these will over time get ironed out and eventually semi will be notably more reliable than ICE trucks.
 

Rocky_H

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Feb 19, 2015
8,807
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Boise, ID
Elon clearly stated that the CT will use the MW charger.


The new V4 chargers are the MW chargers. You need to go back review the Semi presentation.
No, he did not say either one of those things. This is ironic that you are telling other people to review the Semi presentation.

The MW chargers use an entirely different plug type than Superchargers, so what you are saying can't be true. Megachargers are different (in the plug at least) to the V4 Superchargers that are coming. Sure, the cabinet infrastructure running them possibly is the same. But if the Cybertruck only had that triangular Megacharger port, it wouldn't be able to use any Superchargers.

What was said, which is probably what you are thinking of, is that the Semi and Cybertruck will be using that 1,000 V architecture. The new V4 Superchargers may be switchable, so they can charge the passenger cars with the 400V level, but switch to the 1,000V if a Cybertruck plugs in and signals for that. But the V4 Superchargers have to have that NACS plug, not the Megacharger plug, since they are meant primarily for the cars.

The Semi may well also have a NACS outlet
This does seem like a good possibility to me. The Megachargers with the triangular plug are still not going to have many sites, so I don't know if they would risk with that being the only plug type that could recharge it if it ends up too far from "home base" for some reason. I think it would be wise to also have the NACS port so it could use a Supercharger if needed.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
20,445
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Oregon
This does seem like a good possibility to me. The Megachargers with the triangular plug are still not going to have many sites, so I don't know if they would risk with that being the only plug type that could recharge it if it ends up too far from "home base" for some reason. I think it would be wise to also have the NACS port so it could use a Supercharger if needed.
MCS is only for DC charging, so if they want to ever be able to charge the Semi via AC it would need an additional port, likely a NACS. (Though Mennekes Type 2 would make sense as well to support 3-phase AC charging.)
 
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MP3Mike

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Feb 1, 2016
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Oregon
I'm curious what the disagreement could even be. How could the Megacharger and Supercharger be exactly the same thing since they use two different plug types? This seems really obvious.
I think the confusion is that Megawatt charger does not equal Megacharger. It seems like a V4 Supercharger will be a "Megawatt" charger.
 

Rocky_H

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Feb 19, 2015
8,807
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Boise, ID
I think the confusion is that Megawatt charger does not equal Megacharger. It seems like a V4 Supercharger will be a "Megawatt" charger.
Right, that's kind of what I'm picking up on. People are conflating the plug type versus the equipment architecture in the backend. There probably will be a lot of shared equipment for commonality and the cost efficiency that brings, while the Megachargers and Supercharger frontends have to be a bit different because of the plug type difference and use cases. We already see that the stanchions of the Megachargers look a bit different than any Supercharger. They are solid, like the urban Superchargers, but seem much bigger.
 
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I'm curious what the disagreement could even be. How could the Megacharger and Supercharger be exactly the same thing since they use two different plug types? This seems really obvious.
 

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,807
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Boise, ID
@TSemi Right, that's what I'm getting at. Maybe it's some confusion on the wording. And I think Teslarati's wording in that article unfortunately furthers that confusion. The V4 Superchargers are going to have to have the standard Tesla plug that doesn't fit the Semi truck's charging port. But I get what they were saying, that the new 1,000 V architecture running the backend charging cabinets will be capable of feeding either one (given the different plug types).
 
And I think Teslarati's wording in that article unfortunately furthers that confusion.
Teslarati has it right.

The V4 Superchargers are going to have to have the standard Tesla plug that doesn't fit the Semi truck's charging port.
The V4 Superchargers WILL fit the Tesla Semi charging port. This is where your confusion lies.

The new V4 Supercharger IS the Megacharcher.
 
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This is a key point and will affect the adoption rate by trucking companies.... along with charging network.
It seems really really likely though Tesla will have a quick response mobile service team set up that can deal with things quickly. At least for the short term while there isn’t a huge volume of semis on the road. Later, when there are substantial numbers, it will get tougher. Inevitably it will help that the semi has substantially fewer moving parts than diesel trucks.
Tesla does have a lot of experience with mobile service it can put into play here early though.
Likely there will be more problems with the trucks early, then these will over time get ironed out and eventually semi will be notably more reliable than ICE trucks.
Tesla has to be able to demonstrate reliable service and quick turnaround when something breaks. Loaner Semi's would make sense as part of some kind of lease agreement where a loaner would be provided until the repair can be completed. No fleet manager is going to allow much downtime.
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
20,445
51,938
Oregon
The V4 Superchargers WILL fit the Tesla Semi charging port. This is where your confusion lies.

The new V4 Supercharger IS the Megacharcher.
I don't think that is true. We saw the original Megacharger used the prototype rectangular MCS connector. I assume the Megachargers have been upgraded to use the new triangular MCS connector that became the official standard.

I do think that the Semi will be able to use both MCS and Supercharger locations. (So have both a MCS and NACS inlet.)
 
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One more time
I don't think that is true. We saw the original Megacharger used the prototype rectangular MCS connector. I assume the Megachargers have been upgraded to use the new triangular MCS connector that became the official standard.

I do think that the Semi will be able to use both MCS and Supercharger locations. (So have both a MCS and NACS inlet.)
I'm going by this:
Screenshot 2022-12-01 at 8.51.22 PM.png


I know this doesn't show the charging ports, unfortunately.
 
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MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
20,445
51,938
Oregon
One more time

I'm going by this:
View attachment 880583
Nowhere on that slide is "Megacharger" mentioned... It is only talking about the versions of cables.

It is certainly possible that the MCS Megacharger will use the same cable as a V4 Supercharger, just with a different plug on the end. (Or maybe the same technology of cable with larger wires inside to support the extra power capacity needed for full MCS charging.)
 
Nowhere on that slide is "Megacharger" mentioned... It is only talking about the versions of cables.
True. But they used the V4 Supercharger in their presentation, why would they do this? I think the reason is they will use this for the Semi.
It is certainly possible that the MCS Megacharger will use the same cable as a V4 Supercharger, just with a different plug on the end. (Or maybe the same technology of cable with larger wires inside to support the extra power capacity needed for full MCS charging.)
Agree. Only that what I got out of the presentation is they used the new V4 Supercharger for a reason. They never mentioned a Megacharger. Doesn't that seem odd since this was all about the Tesla Semi?
 

MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
20,445
51,938
Oregon
Current Supercharging is up to 600 Amps, and Megacharging needs about 1,000 A. The conductor has to be ~ 30% greater diameter. With liquid cooling, that sounds like a manageable cable.
The whole point of that slide is that you can get 2.5x the Amps with the same conductor size because of the new cooling technology used by the V4 cables. So a V4 cable using the same size conductors as the V3 cables do would be capable of 1,500 Amps. (That means they could actually use smaller conductors if they only want to support 1,000 Amps.)
 
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SageBrush

REJECT Fascism
May 7, 2015
14,154
19,669
New Mexico
The whole point of that slide is that you can get 2.5x the Amps with the same conductor size because of the new cooling technology used by the V4 cables. So a V4 cable using the same size conductors as the V3 cables do would be capable of 1,500 Amps. (That means they could actually use smaller conductors if they only want to support 1,000 Amps.)

Oh --- I see.
Gotcha

Just how cold is the conductor ?
A peek at the NEC 310.15 suggests that a 2.5x increase in ampacity requires close to a 10% drop in Kelvin if I am looking at this correctly
 
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MP3Mike

Well-Known Member
Feb 1, 2016
20,445
51,938
Oregon
"New", compared to what ? Is this a jump in liquid cooling, or a comparison of liquid cooled to non-liquid cooled cables ?

I am not sure, so I presume the tech is the same but 10/6 more Amps are needed

A change to how the liquid cooling works, liquid in direct contact with the conductors in this new version. It is detailed on the slide that was posted just above:

1670000449327.png
 

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