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Wind/road noise from doors/windows -- fix it for good

TLLMRRJ

Active Member
Dec 19, 2019
1,840
1,815
Houston
Keep in mind that there's more than one way to adjust the windows. Yes, you have the screws at the bottom of the rail for in/out, but make sure your window is aligned correctly in the frame of the door. There's left/right & up/down adjustments that can be done to the rail in addition to the tilt in/out that you are already trying. All the adjustments have to be right to get a good seal. If you adjust the window rails correctly, you won't need to mess around trying to jerry rig the seal. This is, of course, expecting that you have the door aligned properly in the frame, which is adjusted with the 2 hinges and the door striker.
 
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olerass

Member
Jul 4, 2019
14
54
Denmark
@Seth2020 sorry for the late reply, but it seems you cracked the code yourself. The key to the b-type seal is as you say yourself not the part behind the flap, but the outer part that makes tighter contact with the window than the flap. In my case the b-seal did push the flap out a bit as well (mine might be a bit stiffer than yours?), but I think the combination of this and the extra sealing is the winner.

The b-seal reduces noise from the back of the front window which is very noticeable due to its proximity to the ear. I'm very happy with the result and good to hear you had the same experience. I still have some noise coming from the back-upper part of the window though, and potentially also from the bottom-front around the triangle area. Still trying to debug it to come up with a fix.
 
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Seth2020

Member
Mar 25, 2020
256
311
Seattle, WA
Alternatively, I'm going to try to find something to stuff under the factory seal to push it out and against the window.

Remember the OP (where is the OP anyway? :) ) did BOTH
1. D-type weather stripping UNDER the entire seal
2. B-type weather stripping between the inner and outer seal

I did both for the driver window, and noticed that only #2 seemed to make a difference. So I only did step 2 for all the other door.

For step 1 I had it pushed out so far that only a tiny sliver still tucked under the b-pillar. That was as far as I would want to go. Any firther and I would get the result KenC got. Glad it worked for ya, but that there is what they call an "abomination" :)
 
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destructure00

Active Member
Mar 2, 2019
1,468
1,620
Scottsdale, AZ
Keep in mind that there's more than one way to adjust the windows. Yes, you have the screws at the bottom of the rail for in/out, but make sure your window is aligned correctly in the frame of the door. There's left/right & up/down adjustments that can be done to the rail in addition to the tilt in/out that you are already trying. All the adjustments have to be right to get a good seal. If you adjust the window rails correctly, you won't need to mess around trying to jerry rig the seal. This is, of course, expecting that you have the door aligned properly in the frame, which is adjusted with the 2 hinges and the door striker.

I'm glad you posted this. I hadn't noticed before, but my left front window was pretty far forward and left rear window was pretty far back.
IMG_20200412_094439.jpg


Compare the gaps on both sides of the B pillar and at the back edge of the rear window to the passenger side:
IMG_20200412_094422.jpg


I measured and marked where the windows needed to move to in order to even out the gaps:
IMG_20200412_095102.jpg


Adjusted front and rear windows to even up the gap. Looks much better now.
IMG_20200412_102306.jpg


Went for a drive. Between this adjustment, window track adjustment, and putting some foam under the existing weather stripping, the wind noise I was having is reduced to the point where it's barely noticeable. I can't say it's gone, but if I wasn't listening for it I probably wouldn't notice. Hopefully that does it, I'm tired of adjusting stuff :confused:
 

olerass

Member
Jul 4, 2019
14
54
Denmark
I finally got around to adjust the window using destructure00's awesome video instructions (thanks!).

I went into this thinking I had to tilt the window inwards, but I quickly realized it was the opposite. Two full turns clockwise made the door unclosable. Looking at the angle between the window and seal (towards the back of the window) it was obvious that there was a larger gap at the top than the bottom. I vaguely remember a Tesla service technician telling me that he tried adjusting the window inwards back when I tried to have Tesla fix these issues -- probably a remnant from back then!

Anyway, realizing that I had to adjust the window outwards I turned the back/left adjuster 8 turns counterclockwise and the front/right one 7 turns counterclockwise. I also removed the B-type seals to have a fresh baseline. With these changes the door became not only much easier to close but the window sealed better as well, both on the inner and outer seals. I adjusted the door striker a tiny bit inwards to make the window close tighter without changing the angle. To finish off I inserted a few small pieces of D-type seals behind the outer seal as I had done previously, but this time it was only in the bottom and top of the frame it was needed. The result: an easily closable door with a perfect seal against the window.

With regards to the other noise I FINALLY identified the culprit that I previously thought was the top of the window/seals or the black plastic piece/triangle next to the side mirror. I taped up all crevices, holes and gaps that I could find along the entire window, but to my surprise it made NO DIFFERENCE in the wind noise from the area:

IMG_0512.jpeg

I was about to give up (again), and started taking the tape off when I noticed a tiny gap on the outside between the window and the rubber seal attached to the triangle piece (it seems larger on the image than it was in reality):

IMG_0514.jpeg

I've seen it several times before without giving it thought because I couldn't imagine how it could cause any noise, being in the opposite direction of wind etc. I spent several hours fiddling with the piece, first trying to mold it inwards using a heat gun which I read others had success with. It didn't work, so I tried to insert different size and forms of seals, also without luck. Due to the miniscule size of the gap only stuff of less than 1mm would fit. In the end I found that cutting up a b-type seal such that the only thing left is the rubber with the adhesive on one side proved to be a good fit. I didn't get a good picture of the final result, but this shows how I started the cut, and afterwards I trimmed the bumps down and cut it in half width:

IMG_0523.jpeg

This leaves a 1mm thick piece with adhesive on one side and rubber on the other, perfect for inserting on the inside of triangle rubber piece. Before:
IMG_0518.jpeg

After (notice the extra piece of rubber on the inside):
IMG_0519.jpeg

I also added a b-type seal on top of the rubber/triangle piece to seal against the underside of the seal on the trim, as I realized there was a potential issue here since there's no window to seal against the trim:

IMG_0524.jpeg

With the door closed this fills the rather large gap between the door triangle piece and the trim. I couldn't add the seal the entire way due to the gap being too narrow at the top, but it's obvious where it fills the gap:

IMG_0525.jpeg

With these changes I am happy to report that all wind noise is gone, both from the back of the window (due to the window tilt adjustments) and the front (due to fixes to the rubber/triangle piece). I had to drive the car several times to believe how silent it has become. It's been very windy here today which usually causes a lot of hiss/wind noise, but today there was nothing, even on the highway at 90mph. All I can hear now is tolerable wind noise from the windshield. Heureka.
 

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destructure00

Active Member
Mar 2, 2019
1,468
1,620
Scottsdale, AZ
I finally got around to adjust the window using destructure00's awesome video instructions (thanks!).

I went into this thinking I had to tilt the window inwards, but I quickly realized it was the opposite. Two full turns clockwise made the door unclosable. Looking at the angle between the window and seal (towards the back of the window) it was obvious that there was a larger gap at the top than the bottom. I vaguely remember a Tesla service technician telling me that he tried adjusting the window inwards back when I tried to have Tesla fix these issues -- probably a remnant from back then!

Anyway, realizing that I had to adjust the window outwards I turned the back/left adjuster 8 turns counterclockwise and the front/right one 7 turns counterclockwise. I also removed the B-type seals to have a fresh baseline. With these changes the door became not only much easier to close but the window sealed better as well, both on the inner and outer seals. I adjusted the door striker a tiny bit inwards to make the window close tighter without changing the angle. To finish off I inserted a few small pieces of D-type seals behind the outer seal as I had done previously, but this time it was only in the bottom and top of the frame it was needed. The result: an easily closable door with a perfect seal against the window.

With regards to the other noise I FINALLY identified the culprit that I previously thought was the top of the window/seals or the black plastic piece/triangle next to the side mirror. I taped up all crevices, holes and gaps that I could find along the entire window, but to my surprise it made NO DIFFERENCE in the wind noise from the area:

View attachment 532682

I was about to give up (again), and started taking the tape off when I noticed a tiny gap on the outside between the window and the rubber seal attached to the triangle piece (it seems larger on the image than it was in reality):

View attachment 532684

I've seen it several times before without giving it thought because I couldn't imagine how it could cause any noise, being in the opposite direction of wind etc. I spent several hours fiddling with the piece, first trying to mold it inwards using a heat gun which I read others had success with. It didn't work, so I tried to insert different size and forms of seals, also without luck. Due to the miniscule size of the gap only stuff of less than 1mm would fit. In the end I found that cutting up a b-type seal such that the only thing left is the rubber with the adhesive on one side proved to be a good fit. I didn't get a good picture of the final result, but this shows how I started the cut, and afterwards I trimmed the bumps down and cut it in half width:

View attachment 532687

This leaves a 1mm thick piece with adhesive on one side and rubber on the other, perfect for inserting on the inside of triangle rubber piece. Before:
View attachment 532691

After (notice the extra piece of rubber on the inside):
View attachment 532692

I also added a b-type seal on top of the rubber/triangle piece to seal against the underside of the seal on the trim, as I realized there was a potential issue here since there's no window to seal against the trim:

View attachment 532697

With the door closed this fills the rather large gap between the door triangle piece and the trim. I couldn't add the seal the entire way due to the gap being too narrow at the top, but it's obvious where it fills the gap:

View attachment 532698

With these changes I am happy to report that all wind noise is gone, both from the back of the window (due to the window tilt adjustments) and the front (due to fixes to the rubber/triangle piece). I had to drive the car several times to believe how silent it has become. It's been very windy here today which usually causes a lot of hiss/wind noise, but today there was nothing, even on the highway at 90mph. All I can hear now is tolerable wind noise from the windshield. Heureka.


THANK YOU FOR THIS! I checked that spot by the mirror on mine and had the same gap as you. Got my heat gun out and was able to reshape that piece to close up the gap, and I'm happy to report that the wind noise is finally GONE! I think the other window adjustments helped, but this may have been the actual problem to begin with. Yay!
 
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