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14-50 nema materials checklist

Not planning to put in a sub-panel at the moment. My understanding was that if I wanted to do two HPWC, later down the line, current gen3 of the HPWCs require a sub-panel, where as gen2 HPWC required just a junction box/Polaris connectors. There are a few reasons I'm not putting a HPWC in now: 1) I anticipate that the 32A out of a 6-50 outlet will be more than enough for our use, and we don't take trips out of town often, 2) I do not currently have a second EV and probably won't for at least 3-4 years, and 3) IF, IF, I get a second EV then, AND it's a Tesla, and I want to install two HPWCs at that point, I'd rather buy them both then; I don't want to run into the problem people are facing where they have a gen2 and now need a gen3 and the two aren't compatible.
 

sleepydoc

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Aug 2, 2020
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Minneapolis
Not planning to put in a sub-panel at the moment. My understanding was that if I wanted to do two HPWC, later down the line, current gen3 of the HPWCs require a sub-panel, where as gen2 HPWC required just a junction box/Polaris connectors. There are a few reasons I'm not putting a HPWC in now: 1) I anticipate that the 32A out of a 6-50 outlet will be more than enough for our use, and we don't take trips out of town often, 2) I do not currently have a second EV and probably won't for at least 3-4 years, and 3) IF, IF, I get a second EV then, AND it's a Tesla, and I want to install two HPWCs at that point, I'd rather buy them both then; I don't want to run into the problem people are facing where they have a gen2 and now need a gen3 and the two aren't compatible.
Sounds smart. What size wire were you planning on pulling? If you think you're highly likely to add a second EV in the future it might make sense to upsize your wiring now. Doubly so if it's difficult to run it from your service panel. If it's not a difficult run you can go smaller now and save some money but then you end up paying more to replace it all in the future if you decide to upgrade. Pick your poison!
 
Going to run 6awg. I'd love to run a bigger wire, but the house is on a 200A main panel, with a 100A sub panel -- which is the one we're going to put the breaker on. At least two electricians that stopped by (and I know and trust the last one, that will actually do the work) said that you can't really put a higher draw on that sub panel (which as I said is 100A and already has 8 x 15A breakers on it).

That said I've since figured out what the sub panel controls in the house (I've only been here 3 years, the house is about 35 yrs old now) and unfortunately not everything is labeled on the electrical panels. The main panel actually at least does have all the major (high power draw) equipment, like ACx2, FurnacesX2, Stove, PoolEq, etc., labeled, but not everything, and the sub panel has nothing labeled at all. Anyways, figured out that the sub panel is just for the basement lights and outlets (I'm guessing the basement was likely finished later than the main floors). So I'll ask the electrician again, but I can't imagine really asking the 100A sub panel to allocate any more than 60A to this/these chargers.

All things considered, now that we found a path to the garage, even though it's through a finished ceiling but one where there are recessed lights that are easily dropped down which then helps run the wire fairly easily; running the wire really won't be THAT hard. And if I REALLY need to add or run more wire in the future, it shouldn't be that bad.
 
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Sophias_dad

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All things considered, now that we found a path to the garage, even though it's through a finished ceiling but one where there are recessed lights that are easily dropped down which then helps run the wire fairly easily; running the wire really won't be THAT hard. And if I REALLY need to add or run more wire in the future, it shouldn't be that bad.
Just a reminder... it isn't clear whether you are planning NMB or conduit. If its NMB, #6 isn't supposed to carry 48amps continuously(or be connected to a 60 amp breaker). If you are running Teck 90 or some other flexible conduit, #6 is fine. I'm assuming you are using flexible-something since you are snaking above the ceiling.
 
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Just a reminder... it isn't clear whether you are planning NMB or conduit. If its NMB, #6 isn't supposed to carry 48amps continuously(or be connected to a 60 amp breaker). If you are running Teck 90 or some other flexible conduit, #6 is fine. I'm assuming you are using flexible-something since you are snaking above the ceiling.
Copper, not NMB
 

Sophias_dad

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Copper, not NMB
NMB is more commonly known as romex. Its several conductors(always copper) and a ground in a rubbery sheath.

Before someone gets on me about saying NMB is always copper... there are other nmb-looking things that have large aluminum conductors, but its no longer called NMB then.
 

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