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About that "yoke" steering wheel

MagnusMako

Member
Jan 29, 2019
758
1,294
Austin, TX
I know this has been a controversial topic with many unsure what the yoke steering wheel will be like. Well fortunately for the curious, there is one good example of someone driving the KITT car on the public roads that talks about why it is not great for sharp turns.

See 3:05 in this video:


Also, the NHTSA is looking into whether it is even actually legal for them to produce it:

NHTSA Not Sure If Tesla Can Actually Sell Yoke-Shaped Steering Wheel | Carscoops
 

Cheburashka

Active Member
Jan 29, 2018
2,314
2,823
Los Gatos, CA
I know this has been a controversial topic with many unsure what the yoke steering wheel will be like. Well fortunately for the curious, there is one good example of someone driving the KITT car on the public roads that talks about why it is not great for sharp turns.

See 3:05 in this video:


Also, the NHTSA is looking into whether it is even actually legal for them to produce it:

NHTSA Not Sure If Tesla Can Actually Sell Yoke-Shaped Steering Wheel | Carscoops

You are wrong.

This is why a technology called dynamic steering exists. The amount you have to turn the wheel varies bases on speed.
 

Enginerd

Member
Jun 24, 2017
363
976
Savannah, GA
Enjoyed the KITT video.

Now, that replica car had the stock steering ratio, which clearly doesn't work well with the yoke. That said, of course you could change it from rotating say 520 deg (to the lock or steering bumper) to say 90 deg. While this would eliminate the hand over hand and upside down buttons issue, it would also make the steering super twitchy and sensitive for fine tuning at highway speeds. As others have said, you can (1) tweak the power steering boost as a function of driving speed, or you could (2) have a nonlinear ratio that allows full steering angles at parking speeds while offering reduced sensitivity when driving straight. But if you try to do this within 90 deg of available rotation, you end up with something that is really nonlinear, and humans tend to reject nonlinear controls... when the brain can't reliably predict what the output will be for a given input.

It is possible that they're switching to completely drive-by-wire technology, where they could actually alter the steering ratio with speed. My bet, however, is that they're just trying to generate a bunch of press, and the actual car will be available with a standard-ish steering wheel. There's a good chance that will be what people end up wanting (either before or after delivery)... especially if it's the only legal option.
 

MagnusMako

Member
Jan 29, 2019
758
1,294
Austin, TX
You are wrong.

This is why a technology called dynamic steering exists. The amount you have to turn the wheel varies bases on speed.

I surmise you think that one won't need to turn the yoke enough to be an issue because of a technology that you know exists in this car?

I'd like to point out that test drive videos in the new Roadster from the 2017 unveil event show clear examples of the driver having to turn the yoke atleast once a full 360 degrees. Does this car not have dynamic steering? If the S is anything like the Roadster prototype, and you still have to turn the wheel that far - that is going annoying to be annoying to use.

See 39 seconds into this Roadster test drive video:

 

Cheburashka

Active Member
Jan 29, 2018
2,314
2,823
Los Gatos, CA
Enjoyed the KITT video.

Now, that replica car had the stock steering ratio, which clearly doesn't work well with the yoke. That said, of course you could change it from rotating say 520 deg (to the lock or steering bumper) to say 90 deg. While this would eliminate the hand over hand and upside down buttons issue, it would also make the steering super twitchy and sensitive for fine tuning at highway speeds. As others have said, you can (1) tweak the power steering boost as a function of driving speed, or you could (2) have a nonlinear ratio that allows full steering angles at parking speeds while offering reduced sensitivity when driving straight. But if you try to do this within 90 deg of available rotation, you end up with something that is really nonlinear, and humans tend to reject nonlinear controls... when the brain can't reliably predict what the output will be for a given input.

It is possible that they're switching to completely drive-by-wire technology, where they could actually alter the steering ratio with speed. My bet, however, is that they're just trying to generate a bunch of press, and the actual car will be available with a standard-ish steering wheel. There's a good chance that will be what people end up wanting (either before or after delivery)... especially if it's the only legal option.

It doesn't need to be drive by wire at all.

Dynamic steering on Audi's is purely mechanical.
 
Dec 22, 2020
24
42
Florida
I'd like to point out that test drive videos in the new Roadster from the 2017 unveil event show clear examples of the driver having to turn the yoke atleast once a full 360 degrees. Does this car not have dynamic steering? If the S is anything like the Roadster prototype, and you still have to turn the wheel that far - that is going annoying to be annoying to use.

That roadster is a prototype. Obviously there was more engineering to occur between it and the production version. Easier to slap a fancy racing yoke on there than perfect the software before the unveil.
 

MXLRplus

Active Member
Mar 11, 2020
1,595
2,451
Eastvale, CA
Could be worse:

e0b73ab0333fa5c606a8358278fc6736.jpg
 

serendipitous

Member
Sep 10, 2019
351
529
Maryland, USA
I think it's funny that everyone is talking about dynamic steering ratios making the yoke ok. Pretty sure that's just conjecture, as I don't think there was any announcement about that.

There wasn't, but instead, there's COPIOUS amounts of hand-wringing and doomsaying over how on earth you'll put the car in drive or how the yoke will make it impossible to park.

I tend to favor the idea that the engineers had some clue what they were doing and have reasonable solutions to these issues and that it's silly to speculate when exactly ZERO people have actually driven this thing and commented on it other than Elon. I, for one, find the Model 3 to be undrivable ergonomically, between the stupid PRND/Autopilot stalk, no wiper stalk, no cruise control stalk, and no instrument cluster, but plenty of people have decided that it might actually be fine. I look forward to seeing what the S is actually like to drive, and I'm sure I'll be able to wrangle it when my Plaid+ arrives :)
 

46&2

Member
Dec 15, 2014
336
180
Switzerland
I, for one, find the Model 3 to be undrivable ergonomically, between the stupid PRND/Autopilot stalk, no wiper stalk, no cruise control stalk, ...

...

I look forward to seeing what the S is actually like to drive, and I'm sure I'll be able to wrangle it when my Plaid+ arrives :)
Great. I am sure we will figure out how to control our new Model S ;)

As for the first part: I dislike the Model 3 controls, too, for yet another reason:
Once set to D, my Model S can be controlled with one hand. Blinker, music, AutoPilot or Cruise Control - everything is there. With Model 3 steering, the dmnd... AP moved to the right.
Gone the days the right hand was free to grab your drink, reach for sweets, operate the screen, wave at moronic drivers, relax on the console, scratch your head and balls...
 
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