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Ear pain/Pressure help

HI @MY-Y and @gundarx , i like to know is anything like PE Foam will stick and able to tear-off ? i picked up my car on Mar and im afraid this will void the warranty. My wife and i can hear that noise on driver seats and willing to fix it since tesla service center unable to fix it at this moment.
thanks

While possible to remove the PE foam, it will be messy, similar to removing any foam tape which may easily shred the foam while leaving the adhesive backing on the surface. With enough effort and Goo Gone, it should come off completely. The butyl tape once cured may be very difficult to remove and consider that to be permanent.

With that said, the surfaces we’re treating with butyl and PE foam are all hidden inside panels and it would be surprising if anyone inspecting the car in case you trade or sell it would ever see it. For warranty to be an issue, Tesla would have to prove that the sound insulation broke a component or caused its failure. I can’t think of where that would be a concern except maybe by sealing the amplifier so well that it overheats? It’s more like having window tint which would be a non-issue for warranty unless it causes glass failure.
 
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While possible to remove the PE foam, it will be messy, similar to removing any foam tape which may easily shred the foam while leaving the adhesive backing on the surface. With enough effort and Goo Gone, it should come off completely. The butyl tape once cured may be very difficult to remove and consider that to be permanent.

With that said, the surfaces we’re treating with butyl and PE foam are all hidden inside panels and it would be surprising if anyone inspecting the car in case you trade or sell it would ever see it. For warranty to be an issue, Tesla would have to prove that the sound insulation broke a component or caused its failure. I can’t think of where that would be a concern except maybe by sealing the amplifier so well that it overheats? It’s more like having window tint which would be a non-issue for warranty unless it causes glass failure.
Thank you for the reply, im going to try to put the thick blanket on trunk to see does the boom still happen, should it cover the boom noise? also, i checked there is a Noico RED 150 mil (4mm) on amazon, so we dont have to roll the 315 mil (8mm). is that a big different if you roll the 8mm thick to 4mm thin? sorry I dont know much about the car noise cancellation material. so you know any video to show how to open the trunk? i tried the youtube and i dont find any video to show how to open the trunk all the way to the bottom like you guys did. im afraid to open it and can't put it back
 
See my post here for info about taking off the trunk trim and applying sound deadening material, with a YouTube video:
 

MY-Y

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See my post here for info about taking off the trunk trim and applying sound deadening material, with a YouTube video:
Just go light with the butyl or the power liftgate won't open. The main benefits are from treating the large open areas inside the 1/4 panels. Treating the bucket and liftgate helped only a little.
 
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Pianewman

2021 MYLR VIN 88,XXX, Rd/Wh, 12/20 delivery
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Just go light with the butyl or the power liftgate won't open. The main benefits are from treating the large open areas inside the 1/4 panels. Treating the bucket and liftgate helped only a little.
Would there be any advantage to lighter, open-cell foam in this area? The butyl damps the surface, right? The foam would deaden the sound, like the "egg-crate" foam in a recording studio.
 
From what I remember, it is not difficult. The panels are held on only by clips, so you can simply pull them out, similar to the other trim pieces in the back of the car. You can look at 4:21 in the below video:


But you do not need to pull out the top trim like Minh does.

On the driver's side, there are two cables. One cable is the 12V power outlet or "cigarette lighter". The other cable is the rear seat switches. When you pull out the driver's side panel, be careful not to pull on the cables too much. When you pull the panel out a little, then you can reach in and disconnect the cables. I used pliers to disconnect one of the cables because I could not do it with my fingers. It is a little scary, but not too bad. It's easy to reconnect the cables when you put the trim panel back on.

I attached a new picture with the cables and their sockets labeled.
 

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So the service center installed the rear hatch bumpers and extra trim on mine.
IMG_8153.jpg


It reduced LCpeak decibel readings by about 3dB but average level by only 0.5dB. So I did some before-and-after recordings while driving on slightly bumpy roads at 30MPH and looked at the FFT. Here is before:

OG.png



And then here is after:

Bumpers.png


As you can see the problematic resonant peak at approximately 36Hz is essentially completely unchanged. However, there is a reduction at around 150Hz and another at around 200Hz. Unfortunately these were already much lower than the problematic booming 36Hz noise.

So I'd like to know how this looks for folks who've gone further with butyl and other treatments. Can anyone who feels confident that they've tamed the booming issue go and record maybe 30 seconds or so of iPhone video from the cabin while driving on slightly uneven roads at approx. 30MPH and send it my way? I'd like to take a look and see how it compares.
 
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So the service center installed the rear hatch bumpers and extra trim on mine.
View attachment 665982

It reduced LCpeak decibel readings by about 3dB but average level by only 0.5dB. So I did some before-and-after recordings while driving on slightly bumpy roads at 30MPH and looked at the FFT. Here is before:

View attachment 665984


And then here is after:

View attachment 665985

As you can see the problematic resonant peak at approximately 36Hz is essentially completely unchanged. However, there is a reduction at around 150Hz and another at around 200Hz. Unfortunately these were already much lower than the problematic booming 36Hz noise.

So I'd like to know how this looks for folks who've gone further with butyl and other treatments. Can anyone who feels confident that they've tamed the booming issue go and record maybe 30 seconds or so of iPhone video from the cabin while driving on slightly uneven roads at approx. 30MPH and send it my way? I'd like to take a look and see how it compares.
i have the record while my wife driving and the booming only happened while driving at 50km/h + , the issue is at 32Hz .
Here it is :
i have that bumper installed on my trunk and it doesn't help at all. however, they haven't install the long extra trim on mine. I'm living in Toronto, Canada.

I'm thinking to install the deadening mat, i just have no confident to pull out the quarter panel.
 
From what I remember, it is not difficult. The panels are held on only by clips, so you can simply pull them out, similar to the other trim pieces in the back of the car. You can look at 4:21 in the below video:


But you do not need to pull out the top trim like Minh does.

On the driver's side, there are two cables. One cable is the 12V power outlet or "cigarette lighter". The other cable is the rear seat switches. When you pull out the driver's side panel, be careful not to pull on the cables too much. When you pull the panel out a little, then you can reach in and disconnect the cables. I used pliers to disconnect one of the cables because I could not do it with my fingers. It is a little scary, but not too bad. It's easy to reconnect the cables when you put the trim panel back on.

I attached a new picture with the cables and their sockets labeled.
Thanks for the detail picture. Do you remember where you start pull out the panel? the gap between the trunk rubber seal and the quarter panel?
 
i have the record while my wife driving and the booming only happened while driving at 50km/h + , the issue is at 32Hz .
Here it is :
i have that bumper installed on my trunk and it doesn't help at all. however, they haven't install the long extra trim on mine. I'm living in Toronto, Canada.

I'm thinking to install the deadening mat, i just have no confident to pull out the quarter panel.

Here's the FFT analysis of your recording. Looks very similar to mine, with the resonant peak at around 34.5Hz

Screen Shot 2021-05-26 at 11.55.36 AM.png
 
No solutions, but a few more thoughts:

I was curious what other EV manufacturers might do to eliminate these noises, so I did some searching on the Mercedes EQS Sedan. I was surprised to find that the EQS actually has a rear hatch, similar to the Model S. Because of this, they faced many of the same low-frequency noise challenges. MB was kind enough to detail some of the countermeasures in press releases.

Particularly interesting:
"New solutions had to be found due to the concept-related lack of a partition between the interior and the trunk and the aluminum alloys used in many places. Low-frequency noise, which can be perceived as reducing comfort, is prevented by filling numerous cavities in the body with acoustically effective foam."

"The magnets inside the rotors are arranged in an NVH-optimized way (sheet metal cut). This also reduces the use of rare earths. The shape of the winding, the stator tilt, also supports vibration comfort, especially at low speeds. In relation to the permanent magnets of the rotor, the coils of the stator are obliquely wound. Otherwise, what is known as cogging torque could occur. This would lead to slight but unpleasant vibrations when driving at low speeds."

"Highly effective spring/mass components provide continuous sound insulation from the cross-member under the windscreen to the floor of the trunk. Acoustic foams are inserted into many carriers as early as the shell construction stage. Because the full-area main floor under the high-voltage battery is a component with a potentially high noise component, a new insulation part is used. A foam sealed in foil, enclosed in the seal of the battery lid, is clamped between the battery and the floor and prevents excitation. In addition, the main floor is designed with beads for NVH reasons. These prevent resonance of the surface and thus the occurrence of a corresponding structure-borne sound. Two acoustic dividers in the very large tailgate reduce boom noise. These could be caused by roadway disruptions and are favored by the large volume of the cab including the bulkhead-free luggage compartment."

Just some food for thought. There is likely more that they aren't sharing related to the body shape, suspension bushings, motor mounting, constrained layer dampening, etc. Also looks like the Polestar 2 may have this issue as well.

Lastly, in my struggle as an audio person to understand why this noise is so annoying I thought about resonant frequencies. A search for "resonant frequency of the ears/skull" turned up articles about a study from the Acoustical Society of America called "Music of the Body: An investigation of skull resonance and its influence on musical preference."
They ran a test to determine the resonant frequency of a group of people's skulls. The results ranged from 35-65 Hz, with the larger heads having the lower resonant frequencies. I ran the test, purely for fun, and it may have pointed to 31 Hz. (guess I have a big head!)
Results definitely inconclusive. Again, just for fun. :p
 

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This has to be the most informative and discouraging thread here. Some of you guys have gone to some incredible extent to figure out the problem and find a solution, it is highly admirable.
Honestly, if it was me, I would have returned the car. Tesla should be more involved on trying to solve the issue.
Tesla quietly removed the 7 day return policy right when the model Y was ramping up production. So most of us never had the option to return the car.

Tesla’s seven-day return policy has been quietly removed
 
No solutions, but a few more thoughts:

I was curious what other EV manufacturers might do to eliminate these noises, so I did some searching on the Mercedes EQS Sedan. I was surprised to find that the EQS actually has a rear hatch, similar to the Model S. Because of this, they faced many of the same low-frequency noise challenges. MB was kind enough to detail some of the countermeasures in press releases.

Particularly interesting:
"New solutions had to be found due to the concept-related lack of a partition between the interior and the trunk and the aluminum alloys used in many places. Low-frequency noise, which can be perceived as reducing comfort, is prevented by filling numerous cavities in the body with acoustically effective foam."

"The magnets inside the rotors are arranged in an NVH-optimized way (sheet metal cut). This also reduces the use of rare earths. The shape of the winding, the stator tilt, also supports vibration comfort, especially at low speeds. In relation to the permanent magnets of the rotor, the coils of the stator are obliquely wound. Otherwise, what is known as cogging torque could occur. This would lead to slight but unpleasant vibrations when driving at low speeds."

"Highly effective spring/mass components provide continuous sound insulation from the cross-member under the windscreen to the floor of the trunk. Acoustic foams are inserted into many carriers as early as the shell construction stage. Because the full-area main floor under the high-voltage battery is a component with a potentially high noise component, a new insulation part is used. A foam sealed in foil, enclosed in the seal of the battery lid, is clamped between the battery and the floor and prevents excitation. In addition, the main floor is designed with beads for NVH reasons. These prevent resonance of the surface and thus the occurrence of a corresponding structure-borne sound. Two acoustic dividers in the very large tailgate reduce boom noise. These could be caused by roadway disruptions and are favored by the large volume of the cab including the bulkhead-free luggage compartment."

Just some food for thought. There is likely more that they aren't sharing related to the body shape, suspension bushings, motor mounting, constrained layer dampening, etc. Also looks like the Polestar 2 may have this issue as well.

Lastly, in my struggle as an audio person to understand why this noise is so annoying I thought about resonant frequencies. A search for "resonant frequency of the ears/skull" turned up articles about a study from the Acoustical Society of America called "Music of the Body: An investigation of skull resonance and its influence on musical preference."
They ran a test to determine the resonant frequency of a group of people's skulls. The results ranged from 35-65 Hz, with the larger heads having the lower resonant frequencies. I ran the test, purely for fun, and it may have pointed to 31 Hz. (guess I have a big head!)
Results definitely inconclusive. Again, just for fun. :p
There is a Dr. tested the model Y boom issue in China, I posted earlier. the easy way what he fix it make a board on the back of the rear seats to block all noise., im going to order the deadening matt to see does it fix my boom issue too, since i'm going to install PPF and the guy might able to help me
 

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Here's the FFT analysis of your recording. Looks very similar to mine, with the resonant peak at around 34.5Hz

View attachment 666526
the Doctor from NHV lab found out 32.4Hz for this issue on model Y, so i believe it is true, the thing is , i put the thick blanket on the trunk and i feel less boom.
 

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Is there anyone who has solved the booming problem who would be willing to post a YouTube clip here from inside the cabin while driving roughly 30 miles an hour on a somewhat bumpy road? I’d love to evaluate the audio and see what kind of results people have gotten. iPhone or android video should be sufficient to get a good idea.
 
Is there anyone who has solved the booming problem who would be willing to post a YouTube clip here from inside the cabin while driving roughly 30 miles an hour on a somewhat bumpy road? I’d love to evaluate the audio and see what kind of results people have gotten. iPhone or android video should be sufficient to get a good idea.
Been meaning to do this and finally got around to it today. Car is modified as in my old post. I wouldn't say I solved the problem but rather reduced the volume of the sound by a considerable amount.

I held my iPhone 11 Pro in my right hand in the general area of the Tesla touchscreen and made one long video recording going down three different roads, first one ~30 mph, second ~35 mph (starting at 2:00), third ~45 mph (6:00). All concrete. Then I demuxed the audio from the video losslessly and linked it below.

In the middle of my trip down the second road, starting at 3:00 and continuing for the next minute or so, there are a couple booms as I go over particularly challenging stretches of pavement. As others have noted, specific textures in the road surface really seem to bring out the sound. I suspect it's not how "rough" the surface is but rather stuff above my education level involving resonance. In any case, what I'm trying to say is that different sections of the recording may have very different spectra. I would love to see a chart of the change over the length of the recording but I don't have the experience to produce such a diagram or the time to learn how.

 
Tesla quietly removed the 7 day return policy right when the model Y was ramping up production. So most of us never had the option to return the car.

Tesla’s seven-day return policy has been quietly removed
For me, the problem started to occur on day 9. I have no idea what changed and why I didn't feel it on Days 1-8. Something definitely changed as my wife and I both felt it immediately at the same time while driving on Day 9.

I put in request asking Tesla to buy back the car and they declined.
 
Have been following this thread for a little while now. If only Tesla still had their 7-day return policy still in place. I am an existing model 3 owner who bought Model Y with out test driving with the assumption that there is a 7-day return policy. I got it delivered to my home so some rep dropped it off in my drive way and left. The car unlocks only after you accept the delivery. The very moment I got in an drove the vehicle I realized I am going to hate the noise. I have complained immediately and even took the car to service center within 100mi as suggested by the sales rep when I called in to complain about the noise. Long story short. No return. Service center thinks this Model Y is as it should be.

If it weren't COVID times or if I had waited till I could test drive it properly before ordering or if Tesla trusted their products well enough to keep the 7-day return window for those who did not test drive.... Though I feel it's totally my mistake to buy a car without test driving it, Tesla's silent changes to policies every other day doesn't help. At the end of the day this is probably the last Tesla I am going to get.

Now that I am done with my long rant... I am figuring out how to live the car for now (not quite ready to take a 10k hit less than a month after getting the car). Did anyone with a 7-seat Model Y try padding the quarter panels with butyl? Is the removal process any different than the 5-seater?
 

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