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EXPERIENCE: 2400 miles trip Model 3 SR Plus

Big Earl

bnkwupt
Jul 12, 2017
5,286
9,714
Springfield, VA
Have you tried playing with the Advanced options in ABRP, @Big Earl ? Have you found them to be accurate?

Our litmus test for an EV and the charging network has always been a trip from DC to Cape Cod, and I was surprised that even when I set ABRP to 30 MPH headwinds, 30 degrees Fahrenheit, and heavy snow, the SR+ can still make it (albeit with an extra 2 hours of supercharging stops). So the frequency of superchargers (at least along the East coast) makes almost any trip feasible if ABRP is to be believed.

Yes, I routinely use the advanced options and I've found them to be very accurate. It also improves over time as more people contribute data by logging into their Tesla account through ABRP. Note that some cars are still in alpha stage on ABRP, so the calculations are still being refined.

I think an SR+ can make it most places along the Supercharger network, even in the worst weather conditions. There are a couple of expanses that are too far apart, like Murdo, SD and Rapid City, SD (134 miles apart), but those gaps will get filled in (Wall, SD is currently permitted but construction hasn't started).

You'll always be able to make it from DC to Cape Cod because I-95 is saturated with Superchargers. Bad weather just means more time spent charging. The largest gap on the New Jersey Turnpike right now is Paulsboro, NJ to Cranbury, NJ at 63.8 miles but there are three locations in between there just off of the turnpike.

The West Coast is a little trickier due to the greater expanses between metropolitan areas. Eugene, OR to Grants Pass, OR on I-5 is 138.6 miles apart, which would be a stretch for an SR in adverse weather.
 
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Runt8

Active Member
May 19, 2017
1,986
2,372
Colorado
Great information, thanks for the write-up! Do you regret getting the SR over the LR?

Also, I wouldn't recommend turning off your wipers or music in order to get additional range :p:D
 
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billionaiire

Member
Apr 2, 2019
258
270
West of Mississippi
Wyoming is our real challenge today with 30F temperatures, a bit of snow, and a couple of superchargers being 100 miles apart. We just made 155 miles possible in 34F so we are feeling a little braver.

Another challenge will be in central Nevada tomorrow where at one point gap between supercharger is 130 miles. But at least temperature will be in 40s.
 

CAAD

Member
Dec 3, 2018
203
64
NorCal, Bay Area
Wow that's a really huge difference! Though with eating/shopping and destination chargers (charging to 100% with no time cost) along the way I think the difference won't be that big.
I have an SR+ commuter but never planned to use it as a go anywhere car or do any >500mi road trip. I'm looking at Model Y LR AWD for that, but the sub-300mi range is now bugging me.

Even if you really plan for a 500mi trip, the energy use can be unpredictable. Try climbing a hill with 500lb of people and luggage, that range will drop faster than ICE. Someone else also came to the same issue and said the range has to be 500mi to really displace ICE for long trips. I think 400mi will do, usable, in a X.
 

Mojito

Member
Apr 16, 2019
118
37
Orlando
I drove last week kissimmee to Daytona beach 177 and 30 left on the range on 70 speed limit. The temperature plays such a huge roll in range and that is with the air condition on, my SR+.
 
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Swampgator

Active Member
Apr 27, 2016
1,556
3,093
Florida
Wyoming is our real challenge today with 30F temperatures, a bit of snow, and a couple of superchargers being 100 miles apart. We just made 155 miles possible in 34F so we are feeling a little braver.

Another challenge will be in central Nevada tomorrow where at one point gap between supercharger is 130 miles. But at least temperature will be in 40s.
Can I ask why you are leaving on a trip with 90% SOC?
 

Swampgator

Active Member
Apr 27, 2016
1,556
3,093
Florida
It was a slight mishap. Anything above 150 miles I make it a point to go 100%
Yes. I just wanted to make sure you knew how to charge to 100% safely. I usually charge to 90% and then change to 100% in the morning while we are getting ready to leave.
The other way I have done it is to set to 100% and note the time remaining. If it's 5 hours for example then I just schedule the charging to begin 5 hours prior to the time I'm planning on leaving.
Thanks for sharing this adventure with us.
 

Big Earl

bnkwupt
Jul 12, 2017
5,286
9,714
Springfield, VA
Wyoming is our real challenge today with 30F temperatures, a bit of snow, and a couple of superchargers being 100 miles apart. We just made 155 miles possible in 34F so we are feeling a little braver.

Another challenge will be in central Nevada tomorrow where at one point gap between supercharger is 130 miles. But at least temperature will be in 40s.

Enjoy the trip. Tomorrow morning looks like it will be pretty clam, but head winds build in the afternoon. www.windy.com is essential for trip planning.
 

billionaiire

Member
Apr 2, 2019
258
270
West of Mississippi
Yes. I just wanted to make sure you knew how to charge to 100% safely. I usually charge to 90% and then change to 100% in the morning while we are getting ready to leave.
The other way I have done it is to set to 100% and note the time remaining. If it's 5 hours for example then I just schedule the charging to begin 5 hours prior to the time I'm planning on leaving.
Thanks for sharing this adventure with us.

Unfortunately I’m playing safe and charging to 99% when we get to a station before leaving that station, given the weather and the 140-150 mile-apart stops in WY. But good to know the 90% - 10% rule of overnight charging.
 
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billionaiire

Member
Apr 2, 2019
258
270
West of Mississippi
Day 3 (continued):

The rather rough hour of snowy patch abated but I have surprisingly been cruising with an average of 260 Wh/mi in 28-30F temperatures today with a very light occasional heat on to defog the windshield and some wiper action. This is better than the first night when it was a bit warmer and raining - I am guessing it was the nonstop fast wiper action. Outside of our first range anxiety in the morning due to not starting from 100%, there has been absolutely no range anxiety despite the freezing temperatures in western NE and Eastern WY.

By the way, can’t stress how great dog mode is. Also, the dog is doing quite well in hotels and in car because we take so many stops and walk him every 2-2.5 hours. This supercharging “modus operandi” also has given us little to no fatigue.

And when it poured for an hour last night and snowed today, the Autopilot and NOAP have worked better than our eyes could at night when lanes were hard to see.

Overall, it is going well so far. Planning to complete WY today and stay at the border of WY-UT somewhere.
 

Runt8

Active Member
May 19, 2017
1,986
2,372
Colorado
Day 3 (continued):

The rather rough hour of snowy patch abated but I have surprisingly been cruising with an average of 260 Wh/mi in 28-30F temperatures today with a very light occasional heat on to defog the windshield and some wiper action. This is better than the first night when it was a bit warmer and raining - I am guessing it was the nonstop fast wiper action. Outside of our first range anxiety in the morning due to not starting from 100%, there has been absolutely no range anxiety despite the freezing temperatures in western NE and Eastern WY.

By the way, can’t stress how great dog mode is. Also, the dog is doing quite well in hotels and in car because we take so many stops and walk him every 2-2.5 hours. This supercharging “modus operandi” also has given us little to no fatigue.

And when it poured for an hour last night and snowed today, the Autopilot and NOAP have worked better than our eyes could at night when lanes were hard to see.

Overall, it is going well so far. Planning to complete WY today and stay at the border of WY-UT somewhere.
Wipers use minimal power. But driving in rain will definitely reduce your efficiency (mainly due to increased rolling resistance).
 
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billionaiire

Member
Apr 2, 2019
258
270
West of Mississippi
At the end of day 3, we have covered about 1800 miles and have another 600 miles to destination.

Overall the day turned out to be uneventful and I’m glad it did.

My observation that I’m never the only Tesla at any supercharger was invalidated only twice thus far - both in western Wyoming.

I also realized that the battery consumption improved a great deal as the day progressed (probably because the battery was warmer) despite the near freezing temperatures and snowy weather all day. At one point, we would have been able to get 190 miles from full charge (we didn’t - but we could have).

I’m going to take the suggestion by the poster a couple of posts above and charge the battery 90% tonight and top it off in the morning before taking on Utah and Nevada - the goal is to hit Reno by 10 pm PST.
 

latimerluis

filipeen0
Mar 19, 2019
37
28
Antioch, CA
Wow that's a really huge difference! Though with eating/shopping and destination chargers (charging to 100% with no time cost) along the way I think the difference won't be that big.
I have an SR+ commuter but never planned to use it as a go anywhere car or do any >500mi road trip. I'm looking at Model Y LR AWD for that, but the sub-300mi range is now bugging me.

And it’ll be 10-15% less if you upgrade the tires ...

Thx for sharing your experience, OP. Cant wait to read about Day 2. Safe travels.
 

billionaiire

Member
Apr 2, 2019
258
270
West of Mississippi
Enjoy the trip!

Comparing SR+ to LR RWD on ARBP with the following settings: 110% speed limit, max 85 MPH, 12% charger arrival, 35% destination arrival, 68F, 0 wind, 500 pounds of stuff, 3 minutes to open charge port.

Wh/mi: 325 vs 327
Charging time: 11h7m vs 7h34m
Charging cost: $156 vs $123
Driving time: 33h8m vs 32h12m
Distance: 2403 miles vs 2384 miles
Total time: 44h15m vs 39h46m

My average thus far has been 285 Wh/Mile
 
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Duf67

Member
Apr 25, 2019
91
75
Florida
In the first week of April, I bought a Model 3 in white, rear wheel drive with 18 inch wheels, Partial Premium interior, standard range plus (240 miles EPA rated range), and Autopilot.

I want to share some experiences as I am living them in our first ever one way trip to Reno, NV from Pittsburgh, PA (about 2400 miles). I’ll update this post daily (if I make it of course). My wife and I are the chauffeurs, and the two year old Beagle is, well, curled up in the rear seat in his bed. We have planned to do this drive in four days.

We have a spreadsheet with routes, superchargers, estimated arrival %, minimum departure %, etc. created using PlugShare, ABetterRoutePlanner websites.

Day 1: Left PA at 9 am ended our day in Peru, IL at 9 pm. Hit massive rains and an unseasonable mild snow storm in Indiana.

Lessons learned:

1. Having a plan certainly helps but mainly because it tells you where superchargers and destination chargers are not around, or are placed wide apart. But that’s about it. You’ll end up stopping more frequently than you had estimated. This is especially true if you have a Standard Range Plus battery.

2. The in-car navigation system, when suggesting supercharging stops along the route, is overly ambitious. Please do not rely on it. If you are on a road trip and you see a supercharger, recharge. I just don’t feel comfortable when I can barely see the road ahead of me in a storm and the system is comfortable in saying that my arrival charge will be 5%. Just not worth the risk.

3. Everything works against you. The rain, wipers, music, air conditioning, heating, headwinds, and cold weather significantly affect the battery life. To be brutally honest, if you have a car that’s 240 miles rated, it is actually no more than 170 miles with all things considered, to play absolutely safe. If you have a 310 mile car, I think it’ll be about 240 miles. That said, the good part is that Tesla supercharging network has been quite accurate and reliable. At least on our first day we didn’t witness any gasoline vehicles blocking superchargers. But our fingers are crossed.

4. Dog mode is great.

5. Almost always I was never the only Tesla at the supercharging stations. Not a bad thing at all but just an indication that if Tesla proliferation continues, we will soon have a pretty big problem on our hands. I sincerely hope more and more supercharging stations show up off and along the major highways in USA.

6. I’m one of those people who have the true legacy “Enhanced Autopilot” that somehow I managed to get for $3000 basic “AutoPilot” package when I ordered the car in late March 2019. Enhanced AutoPilot does everything that today’s basic AutoPilot does (traffic aware cruise control, automatic steering with lane change execution when you initiate a turn signal while driving in the Autopilot mode) and adds three more things - Navigate on Autopilot which enables speed and traffic based fully automatic lane change (with or without driver’s consent), entering and existing highway ramps (often jerky and with phantom braking), and lateral summon (which will be enhanced later this year).

Anyway, just using the traffic aware cruise control and basic Autopilot on highways reduces driving fatigue significantly. But the hands on wheel and apply light force nagging is very annoying and I really wish if it appeared less frequently. It is absolutely important to check that the driver isn’t asleep or distracted but 60 seconds would be a lot more pleasurable instead of 20-30 seconds it does today. I mean, do not fall asleep behind the wheel! Rest. It’s not that hard.

7. The car design does have wind noise. Get used to it. The car doors also produce a little rattle when pass over a pothole but overall, the car drover very stable in wet and dry conditions being a rear wheel drive on stock tires, albeit they’re brand new.

8. The rear view mirror could be a bit wider; the shape of the car makes it kind of hard to see tailgating vehicles at night if your rear windshield is tinted. Don’t tint your rear windshield.

9. The side mirrors aren’t anything to write home about either. They are a bit too small but they are sufficiently functional, except the lack of bind spot vehicle detector light. While the car is rated all stars for safety, I just think that lack of some basic safety features is simply inexcusable (rear cross traffic alert and side mirror blind spot vehicle alert) for a $40k or $50k car.

I’ll let you guys know how our Day 2 goes.
Thanks for the recap, good info. I too have a SR+ vehicle with FSD but am waiting for a software update so I can play with stuff like Sentry Mode and Enhanced Summon. I also am bummed that we don't have "premium connectivity" in the SR+ but I saw they are planning to make it available to all M3 owners, if you are willing to pay for it. I agree with your criticisms although the blind spot detection for me is going on all the time, with the real time vehicle view around you I always know what's going on although adding a second layer of defense would be nice.
 

Duf67

Member
Apr 25, 2019
91
75
Florida
Day 2: Left Peru IL and stopped in Gothenburg, NE to spend the night. The experience was more or less the same except that I started relying on the in car navigation a bit more. The weather was on our side so no real issues.

Day 3: Left has just begun from Gothenburg, NE and we had our first real range anxiety driving 155 miles from 90% charge to Sidney, NE in super cold weather 33-34F. With heat off and speed around 65 mph, we still made it with 4% battery to spare. Supercharger fully functional. The last fifty miles were definitely stressful as the temperature started dropping. It reinforces my assumption in the original post - all things considered, this specific vehicle is good for about 160 miles tops. A long range vehicle can squeeze out another 70 miles which is definitely recommended if you often do multi day road trips round the year.

Moving on...
So you are supercharging to 90%?
 

PittCaleb

Member
Apr 23, 2019
92
74
New Jersey
Thanks so much for the trip report. I'll be taking my first 200 mile road trip this w/e, lol.

I have a trip to Atlanta planned (850 mi) coming in August... My son and I are going back and forth on taking the Standard Range M3 or renting something (college move-in). Reports such as this are helpful. In the past, we've made the 13 hr trip in a single day (once) or 2 days (twice).

I think the 240 'rated range' and necessary charging time will prevent this from being a 1-day (practical) adventure. Online planner shows 7 stops for a total of almost 3 hours, added to the 13.5 hr trip. Obv no need for food/bathroom breaks as those will be taken care of... But 2 days, seems relatively practical, esp when you grab a destination charge and save on 1 or 2 super charges in the process.

Add in the reduced fatigue with EAP... I think it could be a fun trip. If I took something else, my guess is I would be downright exhausted by the time I got back after a marathon there and back drive and need to take a day off work anyway upon return.
 
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