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Model Y LR Range Reduced?

Stevo75

New Member
Aug 23, 2021
1
0
Belmont, MA
I have 2021 Model Y LR that I purchased last December. It now has about 14,000 miles on it. The published range for this car is 326 miles. I noticed recently that when I charge the battery to 100%, the range is shown as 305 miles (94% of the advertised range). I know the car never really gets the full rated range due to weather, weight, hills, and even tricks Tesla does with the EPA estimates, but I recall that when the car was new the gauge would say my range was 326 miles at 100% charge. A Better Route Planner says that my battery has no degradation and has a 75.3 kWh capacity. The calibrated reference consumption is 282 Wh/mi.

We regularly drive to my parent's house, which is a hilly 200 mile drive through NH & VT that we could do without a problem last winter when the car was new. Now this summer if the battery is anywhere less than 90% when we leave, the car will tell us that we will need to stop to charge along the way.

Does anyone know if Tesla has changed the way it calculates range? Is it possible that the car is limiting the min/max charge to improve the battery's lifetime? Or is it possible the battery has degraded and ABRP hasn't detected it yet?
 

Dennisis

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Feb 11, 2020
687
624
Tucson
The range reduction when using the 20" Induction wheels versus the 19" Gemini wheels varies with speed. At a constant 70 MPH the estimated efficiency loss is ~6%, theoretically the range when new would have been 306 miles. Here is a chart:

Range loss with the different wheel options
Interesting. I will read this thread more fully later. I am curious to find out how wheel size influences range. It sounds like it has an effect on air drag. Also they mention that this is at constant speeds, and if the rotational inertia were considered the larger heavier wheels would be even less efficient.
Altogether that’s why I’m considering my actual rated range (when new) as 300 miles, should be close.
Edit: I should note none of the app's I checked made any attempt to account for wheel size and stuck with the EPA figure - something to consider when using them.
 
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tonyb99

Member
Mar 22, 2020
188
126
Tucson
I don't know for sure, but I suspect Tesla estimates this factor using an adaptive formula that is continuously updated based on driving style, conditions, and history, and the scale factor is therefore different for every car and driver. If the OP's expected range is decreasing I would think this is due to his driving conditions being more demanding than whatever (ideal) default conditions were used in the initial expected range calculation, i.e., more hills or acceleration than Elon used when he came up with his advertised expected range ;)
No, the factor is simply based on the EPA range applied to the current measured capacity of the battery. Elon did not come up with the expected range, the EPA did.
 
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jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,417
3,465
Maryland
No, the factor is simply based on the EPA range applied to the current measured capacity of the battery. Elon did not come up with the expected range, the EPA did.
Tesla ran the dyno tests and submitted the test data to the EPA. Tesla could have voluntarily lowered the estimated range estimate (Ford did this for the Mach-E) but chose not to do so.
 
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jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
3,417
3,465
Maryland
Interesting. I will read this thread more fully later. I am curious to find out how wheel size influences range. It sounds like it has an effect on air drag. Also they mention that this is at constant speeds, and if the rotational inertia were considered the larger heavier wheels would be even less efficient.
The Youtube video "Why Big Wheels Are A Bad Idea On Electric Cars" embedded at the bottom of this article provides a good analysis: Here's how tire and wheel choice affects electric vehicle range
 
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Dennisis

Supporting Member
Supporting Member
Feb 11, 2020
687
624
Tucson
The Youtube video "Why Big Wheels Are A Bad Idea On Electric Cars" embedded at the bottom of this article provides a good analysis: Here's how tire and wheel choice affects electric vehicle range
Wow, good info. I still love my 20's but want to ensure when I'm calculating my rated range I'm figuring in the efficiency hit I'm taking properly. If starting with the EPA gemini 19 numbers and comparing it to my real life 20 number's it's going to look worse than it actually is, so that's a relief - I started out lower than EPA. 10% reduction after 14 months and 11000 miles is normal but 13% would be on the high side. Appreciate you taking your time!
 
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rjpjnk

Member
Mar 12, 2021
715
375
NJ
No, the factor is simply based on the EPA range applied to the current measured capacity of the battery. Elon did not come up with the expected range, the EPA did.
?? The scale factor I am referring to is obviously updated continuously while driving. I can see it change. Tesla calls it Wh/mi, and it is displayed on the left axis of the energy plot. This is the one that can be used to estimate the battery’s current capacity. The EPA scale factor is the one based on testing and is a constant for the model, I.e. it does not change with driving style and conditions.
 
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MaJeK8ball

Member
Sep 2, 2020
27
1
34684
I have 2021 Model Y LR that I purchased last December. It now has about 14,000 miles on it. The published range for this car is 326 miles. I noticed recently that when I charge the battery to 100%, the range is shown as 305 miles (94% of the advertised range). I know the car never really gets the full rated range due to weather, weight, hills, and even tricks Tesla does with the EPA estimates, but I recall that when the car was new the gauge would say my range was 326 miles at 100% charge. A Better Route Planner says that my battery has no degradation and has a 75.3 kWh capacity. The calibrated reference consumption is 282 Wh/mi.

We regularly drive to my parent's house, which is a hilly 200 mile drive through NH & VT that we could do without a problem last winter when the car was new. Now this summer if the battery is anywhere less than 90% when we leave, the car will tell us that we will need to stop to charge along the way.

Does anyone know if Tesla has changed the way it calculates range? Is it possible that the car is limiting the min/max charge to improve the battery's lifetime? Or is it possible the battery has degraded and ABRP hasn't detected it yet?
Stevo 75,
I have a "Performance" Model Y and have a similar issue. I have 13k miles after 19 mo of ownership. Originally I had 244 miles of range when the battery was set to 80%, which gave me around 306 on a full charge- which was fine. Now, 13k miles later, I get only 220 miles at 80% or 275 miles on a full charge. So I've lost about 10% of range. This reduction has occurred mostly over the past 6 months. Based on comments here, it seems to be normal, Disappointed in the range decrease to say the least. I was thinking Tesla was using a different method to calculate this as well. Did Tesla ever give you an answer? I have an appt set up for Tesla to run tests but it's several weeks out.
 
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mikepatel3596

New Member
Oct 10, 2021
2
0
Placentia
I have 2021 Model Y LR that I purchased last December. It now has about 14,000 miles on it. The published range for this car is 326 miles. I noticed recently that when I charge the battery to 100%, the range is shown as 305 miles (94% of the advertised range). I know the car never really gets the full rated range due to weather, weight, hills, and even tricks Tesla does with the EPA estimates, but I recall that when the car was new the gauge would say my range was 326 miles at 100% charge. A Better Route Planner says that my battery has no degradation and has a 75.3 kWh capacity. The calibrated reference consumption is 282 Wh/mi.

We regularly drive to my parent's house, which is a hilly 200 mile drive through NH & VT that we could do without a problem last winter when the car was new. Now this summer if the battery is anywhere less than 90% when we leave, the car will tell us that we will need to stop to charge along the way.

Does anyone know if Tesla has changed the way it calculates range? Is it possible that the car is limiting the min/max charge to improve the battery's lifetime? Or is it possible the battery has degraded and ABRP hasn't detected it yet?
I am having the same issue, mine wend down from 326 to 290. Down 36 miles. I have open the service call, hopefully they will help.
 
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