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Mountain Pass Coilover 6 Month Review

Prior Experience:

I started off with UP moderate springs eventually switching over to the MPP coilovers. When I first purchased my car, I realized that I wanted to lower the wheel gap and hopefully get some improved handling. The Model Y Performance is a big car. Although it does handle fairly well from the factory, it wasn’t making me happy. I’ve been in the tuner car scene for years ranging from VWs, Honda’s, BMW’s, and Audi’s. I always either had spring and shock combos or coilovers. Well from my initial impressions with the springs, I realized that the stock shocks simply were not built to really handle just having springs. I drove across the country with the stock shock and spring combo and it couldn’t handle bumps and would hit the bump stops constantly. My wife also complained about how bouncy the car was.

Another issue I had with the springs was although I torqued them to spec, I would get a popping sound from the front strut mounts. I also would get clicking and tapping sounds coming from the rear as well. With the added bounciness of the car, I started having random creaks that were never there before.

MPP Comfort Coilover Experience:

I eventually decided to make the investment of purchasing the MPP comfort coilovers. I was comparing both MPP and Unplugged Performance. What I didn’t like about the UP coilovers is that I had no idea who makes them. With MPP, they are made by KW but to MPP specs. I have had KW coilovers in the past and have always had great experiences.

Installation was fairly straight forward. MPP provides instructions on their website and being able to adjust the coilovers on and off the car was very easy.

I had my coilovers set on the most conservative settings for dampening and rebound. Knowing that my car is a daily driver and I have to cart a wife around, it only made sense. Immediately, the car was way more comfortable than when I was on factory suspension and when I was on UP springs. With everything installed to spec, I noticed immediately that the random sounds I had when I was on springs disappeared as well.

I also tested the ride on some speed bumps and noticed that the coilovers would not bottom out either. High speed cornering was also vastly improved, even with the conservative suspension settings. My friend and I were smiling the entire way around high way on ramps and quick corners.

What I loved about these coilovers was the ability to go low. I have always driven low cars and in order to get the stance that I wanted, I set the coilover height almost maxing out the drop. Even with the low ride height, the car still was comfortable and rode very well.

Wife Review:

She much prefers the ride quality of the MPP over stock and when I had UP springs. On the conservative settings, it rides much smoother.

If you’re considering going either springs or coilovers, the MPP Comfort coilovers should really be at the top of your list. I learned the hard way of going cheap on lowering the car at first. Do it right the first time and get the proper set up.
 
I have been seriously looking at these and I appreciate this review. My plan is to lower it in the summer and raise it to factory(ish) height for snow in the winter (rally style ;) ) when clearance is helpful.
my question is if there is any need to get the camber adjustment arms when lowering? I don’t plan on slamming this thing so still high enough for fender clearance would be my goal (performance, not aesthetics). Those lightened arms are cool looking though.
Also, did you do any sway bars or is it just the coilovers?
 

thesmokingman

Active Member
Jun 21, 2021
2,090
4,427
Socal
@thesmokingman the MPP coilovers support factory height and I am on a Model 3 performance which is a bit lower anyways. Maybe the model Y is not the same? MPP Model 3 Comfort Coilovers AWD/Performance - Mountain Pass Performance
You generally do not want to max height on a fixed perch coil even though MPP tried to account for this, its due to physics. There's only so much stroke. A dual height adjustable coil liek the Ohlins will be better at going to max height due to its adjustable body. With fixed perch coils you generally want to be more copacetic with its "designed" height. On the flipside due to the HV battery, when it comes to lowering the dual height adjustable coil looses it's advantage and more or less becomes more like a fixed perch.
 
@Herroweric, nice details, appreciated. You didnt mention this (and by your history of previously dropped vehicles, thought I'd ask) but how is your toe and/or camber? Curious if you didnt add any additional MPP parts (control arm/camber/toe)...how is it sitting?

I have the rear camber, toe, and cyber arms. I can tell you that you should get them. Without them, you can’t adjust the alignment. The car drives way better now that I can adjust the camber and toe. The cyber arms also help stabilize the rear. I’ll post a separate thread about my alignment and specs
 

thesmokingman

Active Member
Jun 21, 2021
2,090
4,427
Socal
I have the rear camber, toe, and cyber arms. I can tell you that you should get them. Without them, you can’t adjust the alignment. The car drives way better now that I can adjust the camber and toe. The cyber arms also help stabilize the rear. I’ll post a separate thread about my alignment and specs
I'd add that extra toe-in is good for those running extra wide tires to resist tramlining.
 

miracj

2021 Model Y LR AWD
Jul 15, 2021
86
72
Waltham, MA
I'd add that extra toe-in is good for those running extra wide tires to resist tramlining.
What do you think about MPP's cyber arms, versus Redwood not having an equivalent I believe. I'm not even sure what the cyber arms do. Are they useful for ride comfort? Can you mix the MPP cyber arm with Redwood's rear toe-in, camber and coilovers?
 

thesmokingman

Active Member
Jun 21, 2021
2,090
4,427
Socal
What do you think about MPP's cyber arms, versus Redwood not having an equivalent I believe. I'm not even sure what the cyber arms do. Are they useful for ride comfort? Can you mix the MPP cyber arm with Redwood's rear toe-in, camber and coilovers?
It's not that important of a piece, but if you're going all one sure why not. You can get a view of it here, scroll down to the dogbone. For comfort... if that's the actual goal swapping these generally stiffer parts on will reduce comfort. And generally speaking you can mix brands.

 
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dfwatt

Best Car Ever
Sep 24, 2018
3,464
5,655
FL
What do you think about MPP's cyber arms, versus Redwood not having an equivalent I believe. I'm not even sure what the cyber arms do. Are they useful for ride comfort? Can you mix the MPP cyber arm with Redwood's rear toe-in, camber and coilovers?
They're also called traction and trailing arms which are just different parts of the multi-link location system for the rear suspension on both the model 3 and the model Y. I have both traction and trailing arms or cyber arms along with both toe and Camber arms on my performance model 3 re suspension. Highly recommend that you get all of them if you can afford it. The combination of the traction and the trailing arms delimits the slightly wandering and vague quality of the rear suspension under high cornering loads. Basically these replace the rubber bushing with a high-quality spherical one and somewhat surprisingly there is no discernible increase in NVH or general ride harshness that I've been able to experience. The toe arms make toe adjustment way easier than with the clunky cam bolt stock Arrangement, which eventually rusts over time and becomes harder and harder to work with. And the camber arms allow you to set the camber equal on both sides and additionally allow you to dial in more negative camber if lowering the car doesn't get you to where you want to go. Typically as the car comes from the factory you will see as much as a half a degree (sometimes but rarely more) of variation between left and right in terms of camber. This is true also in the front. They are also made from beautiful brushed and anodized aluminum.
 
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@thesmokingman. This is good to know. I will take a look at the Ohlins.
I've been running the MPP comfort coilovers at max recommended height (430 mm hub-fender distance, a little less than 17") on my Model Y LR for about 1k miles. I believe that is close to stock height for the Model Y LR. Confirmed with Jesse at MPP that it wouldn't be an issue, as well as checking with the team at the shop I went to. Will probably go in for some other work in a few months and see if they spot any issues. Otherwise, there's always the lift kit.
 
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Agree with the review. I've had mine since spring and love them. I should have raised my car for winter but decided not to so I've kept a paint stirring stick in the back to clear out the snow but other than that, its a great improvement over stock.

20211230_142236.jpg
 
@Herroweric, nice details, appreciated. You didnt mention this (and by your history of previously dropped vehicles, thought I'd ask) but how is your toe and/or camber? Curious if you didnt add any additional MPP parts (control arm/camber/toe)...how is it sitting?

I have the toe arms, camber arms, and traction arms for the rear. I just posted about them here:


I have my toe zeroed out and running -2 degrees of camber all around. Drives great.
 
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[In reference to the wheel gap on my Model Y Long Range] 🙂

My goal of purchasing the Mountain Pass Performance comfort coilover kit was 1. A ride better than stock and 2. A lower ride height to fit the 20” inductions better.

I feel I was able to accomplish all of the above with their kit due to the adjustability they provide. As of right now, I’m sitting at a 3 finger gap all around and expect it to settle a little lower then I’ll adjust as needed.
 

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