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Preparing batter for supercharger

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
785
958
Delaware
Since the 3 & Y lack a dedicated battery heater like the S & X, the car uses the front Stator motor to help warm the battery. Since the car is primarily RWD until you lose traction, the rear motor is going to produce some heat naturally while you drive. During preconditioning to the supercharger, the front motor pulls typically 2.0-2.5 kWh. In temps below 50F, I find the front motor is generally around 60-65F, the rear motor is around 90-120F. Coolant is routed past the motors and eventually makes it to the battery pack to warm it up. This process alone won't get the packs up to where it wants to be, which is typically 116-131F. Preconditioning while driving will get the packs to 70-85F in cooler temps and once you plug it in, both the front and rear Stator motors will continuing warming up until the battery pack reaches 116F.

Here are some screen shots of info from the car. These were done in colder temps but it'll give you an idea of what's going on in the background.
I can't remember why I took a screenshot at 16% SoC and didn't wait until 20% since all the others were done in 10% increments. The first image with 9.83% SoC was before I plugged it in.

1617805408321.png

1617805425400.png
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
785
958
Delaware
Since the 3 & Y lack a dedicated battery heater like the S & X, the car uses the front Stator motor to help warm the battery. Since the car is primarily RWD until you lose traction, the rear motor is going to produce some heat naturally while you drive. During preconditioning to the supercharger, the front motor pulls typically 2.0-2.5 kWh. In temps below 50F, I find the front motor is generally around 60-65F, the rear motor is around 90-120F.
I type slower than I can think. I forgot to mention the front Stator motors, while preconditioning to the supercharger, will go from the normal temps of 60-65 to 120-130F with the Stator motor warming things up at 2.0-2.5 kW. Note, if you do this at home while stationary, both motors will need 3.5 kW of energy, but, this is more effective than driving. I can get my battery pack to ~ 80F while parked preconditioning for 25-30 minutes because the front Stators can hit 210F and the rear can hit 170F. While driving, the front is only getting to 120-130F and the rear 90-120F.

I posted in another thread 2 months ago that it appears it's almost impossible to get the Model Y to optimal charging temps by using the NAV preconditioning. The highest I've been able to get the coolant before it enters the battery pack is 91F. This was ~ 45 minutes of driving around with a supercharger as the NAV destination. If the coolant never hits 100F, that means the battery pack will never hit 100F.
 

iustin

Supporting Member
Feb 5, 2020
91
39
Switzerland
I type slower than I can think. I forgot to mention the front Stator motors, while preconditioning to the supercharger, will go from the normal temps of 60-65 to 120-130F with the Stator motor warming things up at 2.0-2.5 kW. Note, if you do this at home while stationary, both motors will need 3.5 kW of energy, but, this is more effective than driving. I can get my battery pack to ~ 80F while parked preconditioning for 25-30 minutes because the front Stators can hit 210F and the rear can hit 170F. While driving, the front is only getting to 120-130F and the rear 90-120F.

I posted in another thread 2 months ago that it appears it's almost impossible to get the Model Y to optimal charging temps by using the NAV preconditioning. The highest I've been able to get the coolant before it enters the battery pack is 91F. This was ~ 45 minutes of driving around with a supercharger as the NAV destination. If the coolant never hits 100F, that means the battery pack will never hit 100F.

Just thinking of the significance of this - does this effectively mean that the Y will have slower charging in the first ~10 minutes or so because of this? I.e., S/X will charge faster whenever navigating to a SC?
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
785
958
Delaware
Just thinking of the significance of this - does this effectively mean that the Y will have slower charging in the first ~10 minutes or so because of this? I.e., S/X will charge faster whenever navigating to a SC?
In colder months, yes, since 7 kW is needed to power the motors, plus the time it takes to get the battery to optimal temps. The last time I did a v3 season in 32F temps, by the time it hit 100F (battery pack), I was at around 35% (started at 9%).

Here's the link to the original post I made: V3 Supercharger, charge speeds in cold weather. Scan My Tesla data
 
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Reactions: iustin

jsight

Member
Apr 5, 2018
456
258
Charleston
Yeah, I figured. Strange that I never noticed it before on our Model 3 SR+ (maybe it's a front motor thing?).
I've noticed that sometimes it sounds different from others. Most of the time I don't notice it being all that high of a pitch. Last time the temps were only ~55F and it sounded so shrill that I almost cancelled it to stop the sound.
 

seanyboysf

Member
Sep 9, 2018
7
4
SF
Does it make that much difference in charging rate? When my m3 preconditions it just uses extra energy 3-5 miles of range that needs to be recharged in the battery when I get to charging. It seems like a minute or two??? extra is worth it if I don't need to pay to put it back in energy. Is it just wasteful?
 

pt19713

Member
Feb 5, 2020
785
958
Delaware
Does it make that much difference in charging rate? When my m3 preconditions it just uses extra energy 3-5 miles of range that needs to be recharged in the battery when I get to charging. It seems like a minute or two??? extra is worth it if I don't need to pay to put it back in energy. Is it just wasteful?
It depends. If the car is parked and preconditioning, it can use 3.5 kW per motor, so 7.0 kW just to heat up the motors. Another 500-1000 watts to run the vehicle, heat pump, etc.

If you're driving and preconditioning to the supercharger, the front motor pulls about 2.0-2.5 kW. The rear is whatever is needed to move the vehicle.
 

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