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Air Suspension deflating slowly - SC will replace bascially everything

My 2015 P85DL is losing air in the suspension slowly overnight. It seems to be the rear right that drops and sometimes both rear and front right are deflated while the left side is still inflated, and other times it's both sides in the rear that seems deflated. As such it is not that big a deal as the compressor quickly fills up the system when starting the car. Sometimes while driving I can hear a small burst of air being pumped by the compressor, but not every time I'm out driving. I can't really say for sure, but the deflation also seems to have a correlation with the ambient temperature.

So I had the car at the local SC to do a diagnosis and they came back the following message: 'we can not do a full diagnosis before we have replaced the compressor, the solenoid block and the RH rear air spring. This may solve the problem, but we can't be sure before we have replaced those parts - and it will cost you around $3,500'

So my take on this is that there is no way that all three parts are faulty, they just don't know where the leak is and have wasted my money diagnosing without a result. The compressor sounds healthy and it does not work hard at any point. Filling the system in the morning it works just like it would from low to high, no longer.

So I was thinking if the solenoid block or the rear air spring would be the best bet to start with? Does anybody have any experience that can help me?
 
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I don't know why they'd replace the compressor unless they have diagnosed a leak there. Sounds like they just want to throw parts at the problem to extract cash from you and not even attempt to diagnose where the leak(s) may be. I agree with the advice you've already gotten in this thread to check with soapy water. Fittings are most suspect, but there have been cases of chafing ruining a line.
 
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I had a talk with them and they confirmed that the rear air spring is leaking (as I expected). I asked if they could confirm that the block and compressor was leaking as well and hard pressed they said that they had not confirmed that on my car, but it was their experience that condensation and in connection with a leaking air spring that the compressor and block needed changing as well. I asked them to change the air spring and I will take my chances on the compressor and block as it has not been running for long periods as the leak was very minor.
 
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I had a talk with them and they confirmed that the rear air spring is leaking (as I expected). I asked if they could confirm that the block and compressor was leaking as well and hard pressed they said that they had not confirmed that on my car, but it was their experience that condensation and in connection with a leaking air spring that the compressor and block needed changing as well. I asked them to change the air spring and I will take my chances on the compressor and block as it has not been running for long periods as the leak was very minor.


Hi, how much did the repair cost you. I'm having a similar issue with my 2013 MS P85. I'll convert from DKK to USD.
 
I think the idea here is that they don't have the time or staff to spend troubleshooting each individual issue with every vehicle. They're probably told by management to keep the flow going as fast as possible. Not trying to defend them in any way here. Just thinking out loud. That doesn't justify their throwing the parts at it. I bet if they could, they'd give everyone a new car & sell the old ones off to auction just because they don't have time to diagnose.. Just kidding, they wouldn't do that.
 
I think the idea here is that they don't have the time or staff to spend troubleshooting each individual issue with every vehicle. They're probably told by management to keep the flow going as fast as possible. Not trying to defend them in any way here. Just thinking out loud. That doesn't justify their throwing the parts at it. I bet if they could, they'd give everyone a new car & sell the old ones off to auction just because they don't have time to diagnose.. Just kidding, they wouldn't do that.
When i did my heated wheel retrofit i accidently broke the clockspring in my new SCCM. I went down to the SC and said "this is what is wrong, I broke it I saw it break i want you to replace the SCCM since its a restricted part and you cant sell it to me." The service manager said they have to do a diagnostic before they can just throw parts at it, but since it probably needs to be replaced we'll only charge 1/2 price for the diagnostic if the SCCM is what needs replacement.

That crap pissed me off, like why do i have to pay for a diagnostic to be run before you'll fix the part I KNOW is broken because i broke it.

So no they don't always throw parts at stuff before doing a diag more like the exact opposite situation actually.
 
@P100D_Me - how much did it set you back?

I hate that 'just throw parts at it' approach. Given the cost associated with repairing the air suspension I think it would be ok to have a few sensors telling you where in the system there is a leak.

Tesla's parts are expensive enough, we don't need MORE parts that can fail. But you can usually self-diagnose where the leak is coming from with some simple logic.

The tank has a schraeder valve on it. Use a tire pressure gauge to measure the pressure....it should be above 120psi. If you see that drop way down overnight, your leak is between the tank and the manifold.

Each corner of the car has a solenoid in the manifold that controls air delivery. Each line is a different color, and labeled on the manifold. If a single corner drops, you know where to start.....spray soapy water on the line and see where it leaks. You'll see bubbles form at that point, and you can cut it out and use a 1/8" push to connect fitting to repair it.

If you see a leak coming from the connection to the solenoid, try cutting off the last 1/2 inch of air line and re-tightening. If that doesn't work, you should likely replace the manifold.....Arnott has a replacement that's not terribly expensive.

If you see a leak coming from the connection to the air strut, do the same as above....and if that doesn't work, you may be looking at replacing an individual air strut.

At least this way, with an hour of your time and a bottle of soapy water, you can do what Tesla won't do for you, and potentially save a bunch of money.
 
Tesla's parts are expensive enough, we don't need MORE parts that can fail. But you can usually self-diagnose where the leak is coming from with some simple logic.

The tank has a schraeder valve on it. Use a tire pressure gauge to measure the pressure....it should be above 120psi. If you see that drop way down overnight, your leak is between the tank and the manifold.

Each corner of the car has a solenoid in the manifold that controls air delivery. Each line is a different color, and labeled on the manifold. If a single corner drops, you know where to start.....spray soapy water on the line and see where it leaks. You'll see bubbles form at that point, and you can cut it out and use a 1/8" push to connect fitting to repair it.

If you see a leak coming from the connection to the solenoid, try cutting off the last 1/2 inch of air line and re-tightening. If that doesn't work, you should likely replace the manifold.....Arnott has a replacement that's not terribly expensive.

If you see a leak coming from the connection to the air strut, do the same as above....and if that doesn't work, you may be looking at replacing an individual air strut.

At least this way, with an hour of your time and a bottle of soapy water, you can do what Tesla won't do for you, and potentially save a bunch of money.
Make this post a sticky !
 
Tesla's parts are expensive enough, we don't need MORE parts that can fail. But you can usually self-diagnose where the leak is coming from with some simple logic.

The tank has a schraeder valve on it. Use a tire pressure gauge to measure the pressure....it should be above 120psi. If you see that drop way down overnight, your leak is between the tank and the manifold.

Each corner of the car has a solenoid in the manifold that controls air delivery. Each line is a different color, and labeled on the manifold. If a single corner drops, you know where to start.....spray soapy water on the line and see where it leaks. You'll see bubbles form at that point, and you can cut it out and use a 1/8" push to connect fitting to repair it.

If you see a leak coming from the connection to the solenoid, try cutting off the last 1/2 inch of air line and re-tightening. If that doesn't work, you should likely replace the manifold.....Arnott has a replacement that's not terribly expensive.

If you see a leak coming from the connection to the air strut, do the same as above....and if that doesn't work, you may be looking at replacing an individual air strut.

At least this way, with an hour of your time and a bottle of soapy water, you can do what Tesla won't do for you, and potentially save a bunch of money.
Going to try this on my Model X thanks
 
Tesla's parts are expensive enough, we don't need MORE parts that can fail. But you can usually self-diagnose where the leak is coming from with some simple logic.

The tank has a schraeder valve on it. Use a tire pressure gauge to measure the pressure....it should be above 120psi. If you see that drop way down overnight, your leak is between the tank and the manifold.

Each corner of the car has a solenoid in the manifold that controls air delivery. Each line is a different color, and labeled on the manifold. If a single corner drops, you know where to start.....spray soapy water on the line and see where it leaks. You'll see bubbles form at that point, and you can cut it out and use a 1/8" push to connect fitting to repair it.

If you see a leak coming from the connection to the solenoid, try cutting off the last 1/2 inch of air line and re-tightening. If that doesn't work, you should likely replace the manifold.....Arnott has a replacement that's not terribly expensive.

If you see a leak coming from the connection to the air strut, do the same as above....and if that doesn't work, you may be looking at replacing an individual air strut.

At least this way, with an hour of your time and a bottle of soapy water, you can do what Tesla won't do for you, and potentially save a bunch of money.
I was able to fix my air suspension by simply changing out a burnt fuse.

I agree, us owners (without warranty) should attempt to self-diagnose issues. Many parts for Teslas are commonly found.
 
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I wonder if mine was just a fuse.
Got mine back on Friday after they'd originally put on the estimate that it was the Front Air Spring Module, then later changed it. Then again this might be fair since they wanted to pre-diagnose the issue & order parts just in case I needed them (this way the wait wasn't as long for them to arrive). I'm just assuming here. He did mention pre-ordering parts as a just-in-case.
 

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Doanster1

Active Member
Feb 14, 2018
1,170
617
Oregon
I’m unfortunately an expert on compressor diagnosis and replacement now.
There are two fuses. F36 is the simple one in fuse box number two under the cowl. If you have a blown compressor, it’s the F82 40A MIDI fuse that’s shorted. It’s the PITA one that’s along with the bank of all other main power connections. Relay K11 should always be replaced at the same time for good measure.
My thread here has pics and all the info. GTech was the savior with info here.
 
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I simply replaced the 40a fuse
Its known as a jcase low profile fuse, easily found in auto parts stores for $2-$5 Canadian
IMG_20220209_195625.jpg

I was prepared to change the relay as well but didn't have to go that far. But i did research the relay and its the same as many jeep models.

I suggest at home to keep the car keys/fob at least far enough so the car doesn't detect it. My built in garage camera caught the car kept reacting anytime anyone walked inside the home close to any adjacent wall when the key was hung close. The car kept waking up and prepping the suspension. This is likely what caused my fuse burn out. But im glad the fuse did its job!
 
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