Welcome to Tesla Motors Club
Discuss Tesla's Model S, Model 3, Model X, Model Y, Cybertruck, Roadster and More.
Register

Charging on 110v outlet and cold weather

Bednarz42

Member
Jun 2, 2020
153
125
Bloomfield, NJ
Does charging on a standard 110v outlet become impossible in cold weather. I’ve noticed over the last week when I’ve been plugged into a standard 110v and temperature dips into the 30’s that charging basically doesn’t happen. My car is currently 87% charged, but the app is telling me it’s gonna be 24+ hours to get to 90%.

Is the car using whatever energy it’s pulling to keep the battery somewhat warm?
 

Attachments

  • 51F1BDD5-C3BC-4B4D-B5B7-6338073A8CC0.png
    51F1BDD5-C3BC-4B4D-B5B7-6338073A8CC0.png
    1 MB · Views: 42

glide

Active Member
Jun 6, 2018
2,881
2,901
USA
Does charging on a standard 110v outlet become impossible in cold weather. I’ve noticed over the last week when I’ve been plugged into a standard 110v and temperature dips into the 30’s that charging basically doesn’t happen. My car is currently 87% charged, but the app is telling me it’s gonna be 24+ hours to get to 90%.

Is the car using whatever energy it’s pulling to keep the battery somewhat warm?
Yep. The car is losing more energy keeping the pack warm than you are able to pump into it from a 110 outlet.
 

Pianewman

Member
Oct 28, 2020
811
496
Fort Worth
It is possible that at marginal temps the pack could warm up enough and begin to actually charge, but winter just started and it will get colder

Re-read posts 2 and 3. Even in marginal temps (whatever THAT means??? 40f?45f?) it's not going to work as quickly as during 65-75f temps.
 

gavine

Petrol Head turned EV Enthusiast
Apr 1, 2014
2,590
2,119
Philadelphia, PA
From my experience in sub-freezing temps, the car will start charging after about an hour on 120V outlet. After the hour, it starts to ramp-up and will eventually get to you 4 or 5 MPH rate. I'm sure there's a low temperature point at which the 120V will never be able to provide enough power to warm the battery for charging but just-below freezing worked for me.
 

SSedan

Active Member
Jul 24, 2017
2,948
2,310
Greenville Wisconsin
At 40f the pack doesn't need heating for 120volt charging.
I was talking closer to freezing. Plugging in while the pack is still warm from driving will help, might even let you charge some below freezing.

I agree I should have been clearer about marginal temps here where an average uear swings from -15f to 95f my definition will be different than Ft. Worth or L.A.
 
  • Like
Reactions: gavine

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,134
7,146
Boise, ID
Does charging on a standard 110v outlet become impossible in cold weather.
This depends greatly on what you think the word "cold" means.
I’ve been plugged into a standard 110v and temperature dips into the 30’s that charging basically doesn’t happen.
Well, that's if you plug it in and just look at it for the next few minutes, it will look like nothing is happening. But it's not going to stay that way.
From my experience in sub-freezing temps, the car will start charging after about an hour on 120V outlet. After the hour, it starts to ramp-up and will eventually get to you 4 or 5 MPH rate. I'm sure there's a low temperature point at which the 120V will never be able to provide enough power to warm the battery for charging but just-below freezing worked for me.
This. It is using all the energy at first to warm up the battery, but after some period of time, it will get warm enough to begin charging. If you start to get into like below 0 temperatures, it's just losing heat so fast that the 120V source just won't be able to warm it up fast enough to get there, so it won't work then. But in the 30's and probably 20's it will work, but will take maybe an hour or two before actually starting to charge.
 
  • Like
Reactions: srlawren

Bednarz42

Member
Jun 2, 2020
153
125
Bloomfield, NJ
Thanks all.

I was getting a little nervous about relying on the 110 for travel in the winter. I’ve personally noticed both scenarios so far....

1. Car initially takes all the 110 energy to warm the battery then eventually begins to add about 1.5 kw’s an hour.
2. I’ve also noticed the car “tread energy” for 6-7 hours when the temp was in the 20’s. Not adding any percentage to the battery.

Planning to travel to Stratton, VT for Presidents’ Day weekend where I expect overnight temps to be in the teens or single digits at that time. Somewhat concerned about relying on 110 to charge there. Closest supercharger is pretty far.
 
  • Informative
Reactions: srlawren

Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,134
7,146
Boise, ID
Planning to travel to Stratton, VT for Presidents’ Day weekend where I expect overnight temps to be in the teens or single digits at that time. Somewhat concerned about relying on 110 to charge there. Closest supercharger is pretty far.
Hmm, yeah, with temperatures in teens or single digits, I don't think that will work much if at all, and I would not rely on that. There's not much in Stratton, but I see on Plugshare that there are several decent charging options in Manchester, fairly close by, if you can somehow arrange part of a day there to leave the car charging for a few hours.
 
  • Like
Reactions: Bednarz42
Jan 26, 2020
194
328
Andrews TX
Back when I drove a 6.0 Ford Power Stoke diesel in Colorado if the temps dropped below freezing I would plug in the block heater into a 15a standard outlet overnight. In the morning, even at 0F, my edge insight would read coolant temp of 140f before starting.

I wonder why the Tesla battery heating system can’t keep the temps up to at least 60f and leave a bit left over for charging? Does the battery have that much more heat loss then a 6 liter iron engine block?
 

DaveORD

Member
Mar 12, 2020
639
558
Chicagoland
Back when I drove a 6.0 Ford Power Stoke diesel in Colorado if the temps dropped below freezing I would plug in the block heater into a 15a standard outlet overnight. In the morning, even at 0F, my edge insight would read coolant temp of 140f before starting.

I wonder why the Tesla battery heating system can’t keep the temps up to at least 60f and leave a bit left over for charging? Does the battery have that much more heat loss then a 6 liter iron engine block?

Surface area? That engine block is much more compact and perhaps shielded better?
 
  • Like
Reactions: ahcpa

2101Guy

Active Member
Jan 6, 2020
1,455
1,260
USA
Hmm, yeah, with temperatures in teens or single digits, I don't think that will work much if at all, and I would not rely on that. There's not much in Stratton, but I see on Plugshare that there are several decent charging options in Manchester, fairly close by, if you can somehow arrange part of a day there to leave the car charging for a few hours.

And in a pinch, there is this Tesla destination charger that appears to be close by?

289 Handle Rd, Mt Snow, VT 05356

Drop it off there for a few hours to fully charge (with permission of the destination place) then Uber back to pick it up
 
  • Informative
Reactions: Bednarz42

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
1,846
1,835
Maryland
Thanks all.

I was getting a little nervous about relying on the 110 for travel in the winter. I’ve personally noticed both scenarios so far....

1. Car initially takes all the 110 energy to warm the battery then eventually begins to add about 1.5 kw’s an hour.
2. I’ve also noticed the car “tread energy” for 6-7 hours when the temp was in the 20’s. Not adding any percentage to the battery.

Planning to travel to Stratton, VT for Presidents’ Day weekend where I expect overnight temps to be in the teens or single digits at that time. Somewhat concerned about relying on 110 to charge there. Closest supercharger is pretty far.
1.44kW is the maximum power you can draw from a standard 120V/15A circuit when charging. The charging amperage is limited to 80% of 15 amps; so 12 amps.
 

SmartElectric

Active Member
Jul 9, 2014
2,441
2,078
Toronto,Canada
Canadian reporting in.

Charged our Model S on 120V for a year in cold weather, below -10C the car never added any range, needed to make a stop at local supercharger to boost battery temps on truly cold days or otherwise drive the car very very hard to warm battery sufficient so 120V would add charge.

Even on 240V 24A (10-30 30A receptacle) our Model S would have trouble adding range on -25C nights (happens only a few times per year). The battery heater takes 6kW peak on it's own, so you need to be charging at 30A or more to add range.

Highly recommend installing a 14-50 40A receptacle dedicated to your car when you get a chance.
 
Jul 29, 2020
53
27
San Francisco
Does charging on a standard 110v outlet become impossible in cold weather. I’ve noticed over the last week when I’ve been plugged into a standard 110v and temperature dips into the 30’s that charging basically doesn’t happen. My car is currently 87% charged, but the app is telling me it’s gonna be 24+ hours to get to 90%.

Is the car using whatever energy it’s pulling to keep the battery somewhat warm?
Something definitely changes at cold temps. I was charging from a 110V outlet a bunch of times, no issue, then recently when charging from the same outlet, the circuit breaker tripped. Only difference I know of this time, it was colder (around 30F).
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
1,846
1,835
Maryland
Something definitely changes at cold temps. I was charging from a 110V outlet a bunch of times, no issue, then recently when charging from the same outlet, the circuit breaker tripped. Only difference I know of this time, it was colder (around 30F).
It would most likely be an issue with the 120V receptacle and wiring or the power plug connection. At 120V the Tesla vehicle should never draw more than 12 amps while charging using a 15 amp circuit.
 

About Us

Formed in 2006, Tesla Motors Club (TMC) was the first independent online Tesla community. Today it remains the largest and most dynamic community of Tesla enthusiasts. Learn more.

Do you value your experience at TMC? Consider becoming a Supporting Member of Tesla Motors Club. As a thank you for your contribution, you'll get nearly no ads in the Community and Groups sections. Additional perks are available depending on the level of contribution. Please visit the Account Upgrades page for more details.


SUPPORT TMC
Top