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For those whining about the UI in the last release...

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pdk42

Active Member
Jul 17, 2019
1,768
1,947
Leamington
Just see how much smaller the map becomes in the new "FSD" beta:

149156457_10160848158164251_6691940884850736768_o.jpg


I hope this doesn't become the norm for those without FSD, or when driving without it engaged.
 
I feel that it was easier to follow directions on my old 7” iPhone displaying Google maps than it was to follow directions on the old, larger Tesla UI. The contrast of the Tesla directions is not great and their placement on the screen keeps changing while driving. Also, the map zoom seems to go rogue sometimes. I’d prefer a better smaller Tesla UI than an A4 sized map.
 
Hasn't Autopilot in general been 'Beta' ever since it's conception? I'm sure it says that somewhere.

I believe so. I think one issue with the UI may be the expectations of some who are attracted to buying a Tesla. There's a bit of a dichotomy with the aims of Tesla as a car producer, I think. They are heavily focussed on making all cars they produce capable of fully autonomous driving, which is a good objective. However, they are also heavily focussed on producing cars with very high performance.

When looking at the target market for any car, I think there's a fair chance that those who are attracted to a Tesla because of the performance, may well have come from a background of owning and driving performance cars, so manually driving a car to make the most of that performance is a key requirement. Making the UI less focussed on the driver, and more focussed on autonomous driving, perhaps isn't going to go down well with them.

That then begs the question as to quite why the performance of Tesla cars is designed to be so high. Fully autonomous driving doesn't really need anything like the performance even the SR+ can deliver, given that it will be designed to behave as if the car was being driven by a "perfect driver".

I can't help thinking that those that may be attracted to the idea of never having to drive their car perhaps don't have a lot in common with those that want a performance car that they can be completely in control of.
 
I believe so. I think one issue with the UI may be the expectations of some who are attracted to buying a Tesla. There's a bit of a dichotomy with the aims of Tesla as a car producer, I think. They are heavily focussed on making all cars they produce capable of fully autonomous driving, which is a good objective. However, they are also heavily focussed on producing cars with very high performance.

When looking at the target market for any car, I think there's a fair chance that those who are attracted to a Tesla because of the performance, may well have come from a background of owning and driving performance cars, so manually driving a car to make the most of that performance is a key requirement. Making the UI less focussed on the driver, and more focussed on autonomous driving, perhaps isn't going to go down well with them.

That then begs the question as to quite why the performance of Tesla cars is designed to be so high. Fully autonomous driving doesn't really need anything like the performance even the SR+ can deliver, given that it will be designed to behave as if the car was being driven by a "perfect driver".

I can't help thinking that those that may be attracted to the idea of never having to drive their car perhaps don't have a lot in common with those that want a performance car that they can be completely in control of.

I think that is a good point.

As to 'why the performance of Tesla cars is designed to be so high' - I think one of the original aims of Tesla/Elon was to show that an electric car could have great performance (i.e. they are not milk floats) to overcome one of the barriers to adoption.
 
Perhaps hopefully, we are heading towards a scenario where the frippery can be turned off giving a ‘driver’s car, and when turned on, gives an autonomous car. One would hope that all points in between would also be available. That would widen appeal but at the same time make it a ‘jack of all trades’. Unfortunately that statement is often followed by ‘master of none’
We have performance, we just need consistency.