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Genesis GV60 comparison to Tesla 3/Y

TL;DR - neither is better.

I’m due to collect my (white/white/19”) Y next week but I became interested in the Genesis GV60 when it was announced some time ago and some of the initial reviews have been very favourable. I finally had a test drive of one yesterday - the two motor Sport version. I’m still going ahead with buying the Y but hopefully if I do decide I prefer the GV60 I shouldn’t lose too much selling the Y…and Tesla actually gave me the best price on my 2020 Model 3.

I appreciate this forum is mainly people who already have a Tesla or have ordered one but in case there are people here trying to decide between different EVs, I hope the comparison below helps. Of course it is all subjective. I am not a Tesla fanboy. I fully appreciate what Tesla has done in spearheading the development of EVs, but I do not workshop at the altar of Elon. :)

Efficiency - no contest. On the exact same journey as the test drive, my Model 3 easily averages at least 4 miles/kwh. I would expect a Y to get slightly less. The GV60 got 3. This has pretty much been the case with every EV I’ve test driven, Tesla gets this so right.

Refinement - GV60 is easily better than my 2020 Model 3 and a MIC Model Y which I’ve been test driving recently. It just has a feeling of solidity about it. All the touchpoints are nice and it is so much quieter than the Model 3 (and the Model Y). The test car did have the B&O sound system which has active noice cancelling which might have helped. Although the ride was firm it was more forgiving than either Tesla.

Performance and handling - the test car was the mid range Sport model, on paper slower 0-60 accelerating than any 3 or Y but in real world overtaking there was little in it. As expected the 3 handled better and I would say the Y probably also handled better though at the expense of a harsher ride than the GV60. Annoying that the GV60 required one pedal driving to be switched on every time it was started. I was surprised to find I did quite like the ability to vary the rate of regen depending on the type of road.

Driver Aids - an easy win for the GV60. It read all speed limits and adjusted speed appropriately in a section of roadworks where the Test doesn’t even see the speed limits. Proper blind spot monitoring, not a video image in part of the screen that is obscured by your arms when driving. Head up display was very good. 360 degree cameras, reversing out of bay cross traffic warnings etc.

Infotainment - no outright winner here. The B&O Sound system was hugely impressive, much better than the Tesla. The GV60 relies on wired Apple Car Play for things like Spotify etc. With regard to Sat Nav, I preferred the head up display on the GV60 rather than having to glance left and down to the Tesla screen and hope that it’s zoomed in on a complicated junction. But the fact that Tesla uses Google maps so you can type in the name of any business is very useful. You might be able to do this with the GV60 but it didn’t have its Connected Services set up so not sure. But of course, the Tesla screen is unbeatable for YouTube, Netflix etc (except for when Theater launches with a blank screen and the only way to fix it is to change the onscreen language, reboot, change the language back again and reboot again).

User interface - I really dislike the Tesla UI. Too much of the screen is dedicated to showing me what’s around the car, wheelie bins, dancing traffic lights. I’ve got windows and mirrors for that. Warning messages with tiny grey on black text etc. They could make this so much better. The GV60 is almost the opposite - so many buttons! Sometimes buttons are a good thing, especially for things like climate control but the GV60 does seem to have gone overboard. But everything that I need as a a driver is there and is clear. The demo car had cameras and screens instead of door mirrors - not a fan but normal mirrors come as standard.

Space - another win for Tesla - especially the Model Y. I was surprised at how little leg room there was in the back of the GV60 given how cavernous the same platform Kia EV6 and Hyundai Ioniq 5 are. There is some under boot storage and a small frunk but they’re tiny compared to the 3/Y.

Other stuff - Tesla gets a lot of the other stuff right in a way that other manufacturers don’t. I can’t find anywhere in the GV60 user manual which tells you how to switch off internal alarm sensors if you need to leave a dog in the car for a while so the chances of being able to do that AND leave the climate control on are probably nil! The GV60 has nothing like Sentry mode. Even though it has keyless entry and exit you still need to carry an old fashioned fob, although that might change if Apple Keys is implemented. With Tesla, you get in the car, put it in drive and go; with the GV60 you have to press a Start/Stop button - if I’m getting in the car it’s highly likely I’m going to be driving it. I love the idea of Vehicle To Load on the GV60 and the chilled seats really do work better than I thought they would. Pin To Drive makes the Tesla almost theft proof, the GV60 has finger print recognition but I think this is to recall seat position etc, not a security device.

Price - the basic Y is now £57990. The single motor GV60 starts at £47,005, twin motor starts at £53,605, the higher performance version starts at £65,405. This includes the same basic cruise control and auto steer as the Y. Adding a sunroof adds £1,200. There are further options available and if you spec the mid range Sport to the max, you’re looking at £63k or £75k for the top of the range.

I really wanted one of them to be better than the other, but they’re not, they’re just very different to each other.


Genesis_GV80_front_view_(South_Korea).png

(차,또바기, CC BY 3.0 <Creative Commons — Attribution 3.0 Unported — CC BY 3.0>, via Wikimedia Commons)
(This image was added by TMC staff.)
 
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Yeah, this forum is, apparently, full of “Tesla haters”. Let’s hear from the fanboys to balance it up 😁😁
This is not a correct assumption. When a person says the forum is full of Tesla Haters, that doesn't make them a fanboy since there is another category called "neutral" or seeing something for what it is and isn't.
 
Spot on and I agree. Very well said. Sadly though I doubt a place like this would promote such a thing "officially" unless it's user driven (posted). I could be wrong; however, it just seems like it would be counter intuitive to turn away potential Tesla buyers, even though it would be facts that are presented.

I'm actually a big supporter of the Tesla online sales model and wish that more brands would adopt to that model. Having Tesla show rooms inside malls for example (like in the US) where people can go and take a look at their leisure, beats the vultures at the stealerships by a long country mile and then some. I do see your point though and am assuming that they don't have Tesla show rooms easily available in the UK?

As for the buyers remorse I think it will become a lot more relevant as more EVs from other makers become available. Tesla in a lot of ways has been getting away with a lot of slack due to being the only ones on the pitch with a decade head start. Now that there's strong competition coming out strong from companies like Hyundai, KIA, Genesis, VW etc... it's shining a huge spotlight on all the things that Teslas lack, basic touches that such an expensive car should have, let alone a better build & material quality.

The landscape of the EV world is going to change dramatically in the coming years and it has already begun...

Edit: I was reading through trackevs and though this article was very relevant to this overall topic.

Great example of some neat info:

"The regen or the recuperation power of a current Tesla LR vehicle maxes at around 85kW. From personal observation, I generally find this value oscillating between 30 to 50kW depending on the speed and inclination.

A cheaper BMW iX1, in contrast, has a maximum regen power of 140kW.

Kia EV6 GT, IONIQ5/6, Genesis GV60/GV70/G80
has an even higher regen power of 360kW."

Note: Hyundai, KIA, Genesis and BMW have paddle shifters to adjust the level of regen to your liking or to turn it off completely.
Thank you. One person read my blog, hurray!

Buyer's remorse
------------------
I went to uni a while ago. In the marketing course, one of the case studies was around automakers' ad spending and why they advertise even existing and newer models. Many cars cannot be perfect forever, and users' needs would evolve and change over time. Advertising is an efficient way to reduce buyer's remorse and retain second-hand resale value. While the second-hand value is fantastic for all cars and EVs, unless Tesla does something clever, brand retention could get trickier over time.

Product market fit
--------------------
After reading several posts and passionately following tesla related accounts on Twitter, I have now realised that Tesla doesn't have much in the roadmap (known publicly) that would benefit the UK market. There is too much focus and noise on the upcoming 10.13 FSD beta, which may not interest someone in the UK looking for better wipers or lighting. I don't know to what extent Tesla engineers and designers even think about UK roads and customer needs.
 
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I love our M3, its a fantastic car. Its comfortable, drives like a dream etc. Technical specs are just that on paper. In the end its how the car drives. THe fact Tesla have the best efficiency by a mile that is the driving force for buying one. It saves me a fortune compared to other EVs.

A couple of things I think that don't think Tesla fit the UK market, is suspension. Some roads are atrocious and you feel every dip. Also the wipers, in my opinion aren't a problem on my 2021 model, except in the dark when its just spitting. That's about it.

I do think most other newer EVs like i5/EV6 etc are better suited for the UK market and I'll be all over them if they had the use of Tesla Charging Network, but its a major downside of not buying a Tesla.

Once the UK have sorted out the charging situation, I'll move on, but until then, I'll put up with a bumpy ride here and there and pressing a button to move the wipers once in 100 times.
 

unlock

Member
Jun 23, 2022
199
337
PNW
Thank you. One person read my blog, hurray!

Buyer's remorse
------------------
I went to uni a while ago. In the marketing course, one of the case studies was around automakers' ad spending and why they advertise even existing and newer models. Many cars cannot be perfect forever, and users' needs would evolve and change over time. Advertising is an efficient way to reduce buyer's remorse and retain second-hand resale value. While the second-hand value is fantastic for all cars and EVs, unless Tesla does something clever, brand retention could get trickier over time.

Product market fit
--------------------
After reading several posts and passionately following tesla related accounts on Twitter, I have now realised that Tesla doesn't have much in the roadmap (known publicly) that would benefit the UK market. There is too much focus and noise on the upcoming 10.13 FSD beta, which may not interest someone in the UK looking for better wipers or lighting. I don't know to what extent Tesla engineers and designers even think about UK roads and customer needs.
Tesla also has what I call the Starbucks & Apple effect going for it being the first (generally) in a segment where they can capitalize on creating that house hold name.

Starbucks doesn't (subjective, but most would agree) have the best coffee, but it's Starbucks. Whether it be a status symbol, brand recognition, or sheer convenience, people will still buy the over priced coffee although it's far from Premium.

Apple shares similar traits; however, it also had the luxury of riding the wave from its prior success when they used to make solid non disposable products.

Tesla has its own unique things going for it on top of the examples above and has created an incredible cult like following (a lot simply by default) due to there being no competition for over a decade.

I give Tesla credit in paving the way for EVs for sure and more power to them for being the first in the segment at this large of a scale, but the party is over now with the introduction of other EVs that are gaining a lot of traction, very quickly.

One of Tesla's strongest weapon was its charging network, but now with it opening up to other EVs, that weapon will be nullified.

Its second biggest weapon is availability, but that too will come to an end once parts become more available. The other makers have the capacity to churn out EVs and they will, while the start ups will likely fail. (Fisker, Vinfast 'a complete joke of an EV' etc...) Just my opinion.

Tesla will have to innovate more, improve QC, improve material quality, and offer the missing features that a $70K car should have in order to stay competitive.

I love our M3, its a fantastic car. Its comfortable, drives like a dream etc. Technical specs are just that on paper. In the end its how the car drives. THe fact Tesla have the best efficiency by a mile that is the driving force for buying one. It saves me a fortune compared to other EVs.

A couple of things I think that don't think Tesla fit the UK market, is suspension. Some roads are atrocious and you feel every dip. Also the wipers, in my opinion aren't a problem on my 2021 model, except in the dark when its just spitting. That's about it.

I do think most other newer EVs like i5/EV6 etc are better suited for the UK market and I'll be all over them if they had the use of Tesla Charging Network, but its a major downside of not buying a Tesla.

Once the UK have sorted out the charging situation, I'll move on, but until then, I'll put up with a bumpy ride here and there and pressing a button to move the wipers once in 100 times.

HMG products can use the Tesla chargers, which is one of it's biggest advantages over other makers.

Now that Tesla will soon be opening up its chargers to everyone, over night all EVs will inherit the benefit of a massive network + the existing CCS etc... (Elon is forced into doing this in order to receive a huge chunk of that sweet cake eaters money aka the gov)

Have you seen the new IONIQ6? It's stunning. There will be a N variant as well. 0-60 in >3.5 sec.
 
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Tesla also has what I call the Starbucks & Apple effect going for it being the first (generally) in a segment where they can capitalize on creating that house hold name.

Starbucks doesn't (subjective, but most would agree) have the best coffee, but it's Starbucks. Whether it be a status symbol, brand recognition, or sheer convenience, people will still buy the over priced coffee although it's far from Premium.

Apple shares similar traits; however, it also had the luxury of riding the wave from its prior success when they used to make solid non disposable products.

Tesla has its own unique things going for it on top of the examples above and has created an incredible cult like following (a lot simply by default) due to there being no competition for over a decade.

I give Tesla credit in paving the way for EVs for sure and more power to them for being the first in the segment at this large of a scale, but the party is over now with the introduction of other EVs that are gaining a lot of traction, very quickly.

One of Tesla's strongest weapon was its charging network, but now with it opening up to other EVs, that weapon will be nullified.

Its second biggest weapon is availability, but that too will come to an end once parts become more available. The other makers have the capacity to churn out EVs and they will, while the start ups will likely fail. (Fisker, Vinfast 'a complete joke of an EV' etc...) Just my opinion.

Tesla will have to innovate more, improve QC, improve material quality, and offer the missing features that a $70K car should have in order to stay competitive.



HMG products can use the Tesla chargers, which is one of it's biggest advantages over other makers.

Now that Tesla will soon be opening up its chargers to everyone, over night all EVs will inherit the benefit of a massive network + the existing CCS etc... (Elon is forced into doing this in order to receive a huge chunk of that sweet cake eaters money aka the gov)

Have you seen the new IONIQ6? It's stunning. There will be a N variant as well. 0-60 in >3.5 sec.
I love the look of that i6. I just haven't seen the boot space. Depending on the price, that could be my next purchase or swap. Decent range and looks roomy inside. The N variant looks like something out of a comic when I was young. Love it.
 
I love the look of that i6. I just haven't seen the boot space. Depending on the price, that could be my next purchase or swap. Decent range and looks roomy inside. The N variant looks like something out of a comic when I was young. Love it.
ioniq 6 front is nice and could be improved by removing the top black panel. The back is just unbearable for me.
 
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I don’t understand this comment. All makes have CCS rapid charging capability in the uk. They can’t use the Tesla charging network (yet?) though there is an ongoing trial of just a handful of “open” Superchargers.
Absolutely correct. No idea why the original poster thought only HMG cars can charge at the handful of open to ALL Tesla Superchargers.
 

Adopado

Well-Known Member
Aug 19, 2019
6,493
4,996
Scotland
Absolutely correct. No idea why the original poster thought only HMG cars can charge at the handful of open to ALL Tesla Superchargers.
I can only think it's due to a lack of knowledge of UK spec cars and the current status of Supercharging here. (OP's location "PNW" I presume, refers to the Pacific North West of USA so that's not surprising.)
 
I can only think it's due to a lack of knowledge of UK spec cars and the current status of Supercharging here. (OP's location "PNW" I presume, refers to the Pacific North West of USA so that's not surprising.)
Fair enough - didn’t notice their location. As a side note it’s a great shame that the car manufacturers could not agree on a single location for the charging port.
 

Adopado

Well-Known Member
Aug 19, 2019
6,493
4,996
Scotland
Fair enough - didn’t notice their location. As a side note it’s a great shame that the car manufacturers could not agree on a single location for the charging port.

I think the position issue is mainly just because Tesla designed their Superchargers for the Tesla vehicles ... other rapid chargers just cover it with longer cables... and I think ultimately Tesla will need to modify their design if really committed to serving all brands. It's a heck of lot easier to do that than to expect every manufacturer to modify their car designs. (However, I would prefer it if they left it until the public rapid charging options caught up!)
 

KennethS

Member
Supporting Member
May 3, 2019
898
735
Herts, UK
Fair enough - didn’t notice their location. As a side note it’s a great shame that the car manufacturers could not agree on a single location for the charging port.
When Tesla designed the first mass produced EVs there was no one to agree with on placement of the charging port. Unless others have compelling reasons for other locations it’s a shame they chose to go their own ways.
 

Zakalwe

Member
Oct 16, 2020
630
678
UK
Fair enough - didn’t notice their location. As a side note it’s a great shame that the car manufacturers could not agree on a single location for the charging port.
There's no standard location for the filler port on ICE cars either. Fuel pumps are made to accomodation different locations and different sized vehicles. EV charging will have to be similar.
Of course, up until very recent time the Supercharging network was a closed ecosystem, so the leads were designed purely for Tesla vehicles.
 
There's no standard location for the filler port on ICE cars either. Fuel pumps are made to accomodation different locations and different sized vehicles. EV charging will have to be similar.
Of course, up until very recent time the Supercharging network was a closed ecosystem, so the leads were designed purely for Tesla vehicles.
Two quick comments…

On charge port locations on EVs or ICE, my understanding is that there’s been a divergence between (at least) German and Japanese cars, with the German cars locating the fuel door on the righthand side in part to keep the user out of the way of (most) traffic while fueling (which would potentially be consistent for cars driven in righthand drive Japan). In addition to our Tesla, we have a VW and a Toyota, and I always appreciate the VW for this. (Truth be told, I have no idea if that explanation is true.)

On Genesis vs. Tesla, at the moment, there’s no brand I’m more looking forward to maturing well in the EV space than Genesis. I’m happy with my 2022 M3LR, but as I look to my next EV, I know it needs an honest-to-God wheel (no yokes) and I’d prefer to have a CarPlay option. I think the current Genesis EV interior is too busy, but maybe it’ll settle down; I like the exterior. I don’t know if a future MS will have either the wheel or CarPlay option (the latter is doubtful), so I’ll welcome the future diversity of the EV market (as much as I’d prefer to stick with Tesla, if I could get these two things in a MS-sized car).
 
EV6 was on my shortlist but the Tesla charging network, range, driving fun and overall ownership experience kept me in the Tesla family, as did the space in the MY, better for the dog in the boot. I switched my Model 3 for a Model Y. But EV6 looks a really good option.

Had the Y a couple of weeks now and while I agree with most of your post, I’d disagree with you on interior quality. I’ve had BMWs. I’ve had Audis so I have experienced plenty of others. For me, Audi offers the best interior quality of any car I’ve had. But the new Model Y is much, much improved over the 2019 Model 3 I had. Everything is tighter, more solid and better quality. It is not “really, really crappy” in my experience so far.

Hey @interbear: having signed up to blow all that money on the MYLR, I really appreciate your reassurance that the interior has good build quality. I suppose I should have been more explicitly clear in that I think the functional design and appearance of the Tesla interior is crappy, I had no comment on the build or material quality. If you own it for several weeks and still appreciate its build quality that is good news. I can look at it and hate it right off the bat, but if it lasts or if there are subtleties that you appreciate with time, that's new info and I thank you for it. Enjoy your new ride! And thanks for your reply.

-TPC
 
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Hey @interbear: having signed up to blow all that money on the MYLR, I really appreciate your reassurance that the interior has good build quality. I suppose I should have been more explicitly clear in that I think the functional design and appearance of the Tesla interior is crappy, I had no comment on the build or material quality. If you own it for several weeks and still appreciate its build quality that is good news. I can look at it and hate it right off the bat, but if it lasts or if there are subtleties that you appreciate with time, that's new info and I thank you for it. Enjoy your new ride! And thanks for your reply.

-TPC

Thanks. I’d say that “functional design and appearance” is very subjective, so you are as entitled to think it’s “crappy” as I am to think otherwise. Personally I’ve come to appreciate the minimalist design with fewer physical buttons and everything on the single screen generally works for me. I still think the door opening buttons rather than a traditional handle and having to open the glovebox via the screen is form over function though. Always annoys me having to tell people how to get out of the car :)

Build and material quality is less subjective, it’s just a fact, it’s definitely improved over earlier Tesla’s in my experience.
 

Bouba

Active Member
Sep 23, 2021
1,423
1,332
France
Sometimes I wonder if the direct-to-consumer model used by Tesla even makes sense. Model Y was the second best-selling car in the UK last month, but how many of those buyers are completely new to Tesla with not even a mini test drive experience? Are people assuming that a Tesla would come with a great interior and amazing seats when they order online without seeing the test car first?
There could be a pinned post on this forum saying here is the list of well-known limitations with a Tesla - Auto wipers, auto headlights, and 100 more so that people need not repeat these on every feature discussion. There could be even a dedicated thread for "buyer's remorse" where people could share their frustrations. This way, when there is a thread titled "2022.x.y", the post would only be about new improvements and regressions alone easy for everyone, including Tesla, to understand what works and what doesn't.
I think that the way people buy cars these days has changed so much that ‘buyers remorse’ has probably seen its day. Company cars with government subsidies, leasing for private individuals etc...it means that any car you ‘own’ has a temporary feel to it...so people are more open to experiment and try new products....and even if you end up loving the car, in a couple of years you still might go for something completely different
 
I think that don't think Tesla fit the UK market, is suspension. Some roads are atrocious and you feel every dip.
For the UK, and Europe in general, Tesla needs to get a shorter Model 3 with a hatchback.
The Model Y has a hatchback, but this is even a larger car than the Model 3, and is more expensive.
 
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