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I just added a standard range Model Y to my garage to join my long range Model Y. Range thoughts...

spokey

Member
Aug 8, 2020
543
204
Flagtown
I very routinely get 250 wH/mi. I'm not heavy on the accelerator and virtually never drive over 60 MPH, though.



No one ever complains that they don't get the same gas milage as the sticker at the dealer showed...

The reality is, that EVs are not as easy to refuel as ICE vehicles are. Charging stations are less common than gas stations and it takes longer, so you notice your battery charge in an EV much more than you do in an ICE vehicle. I charge at home, but participate in a discount program so I can only charge at night, further limiting my charging options.

IME, the variation in 'fuel economy' with EVs is much greater than with ICE vehicles, too. I often get 250 wH/mi in nice weather but during cold winter days I would easily hit 500, meaning my range drops from 300 miles down to 150.
Agreed. I don't understand the hostility to wanting to know how many miles to empty. I also think about charging in miles per hour. Don't see anything wrong with that at all. I don't care about watts. I care about putting 50 miles (or whatever) more in to the car. I don't want to travel a certain number of watts. I want to travel a certain number of miles.

And yes, there are gas stations on every corner so even if you're low, you're cool. Not so with an EV. If I go below 10%, I couldn't get to a supercharger from my house. I can get the nearest gas station with less than 1/10 of 1 percent of gas available to the outback. But the second nearest gas station jumps to about 2/3 of 1 percent. But yes, if I'm out west in the middle of nowhere, I'll start worrying about refueling that car too.

And Tesla could do a better job of this. They could figure out and predict better than they do.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
6,271
7,330
Boise, ID
Agreed. I don't understand the hostility to wanting to know how many miles to empty. I also think about charging in miles per hour. Don't see anything wrong with that at all. I don't care about watts. I care about putting 50 miles (or whatever) more in to the car. I don't want to travel a certain number of watts. I want to travel a certain number of miles.
Yeah, same, except I do try to continue to call them "rated miles" to keep that clear that it's the EPA version of that thing. It's kind of like Canadian miles or "Manufacturer's suggested retail price" miles. It's a little higher than the real thing.
 
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THF2021MY

Member
May 18, 2021
14
3
Florida
Hi, I got my MY SR a week ago, but did not start driving it to/from work until three days ago. it is black on black on black and named the MY SR-71 Blackbird. My commute is 60 miles round trip. I live in South Florida and my commute is mostly on I-75 and the Palmetto expressway. I drive spiritedly. Usually not less than 70 unless traffic dictates. I’ve got a couple questions:

1. When I start driving I feel constant minor vibrations in the steering wheel. They go away after a bit. Could it be the tires?

2. On the Energy display are the displayed ranges, instant or average, calculated from the last charge or from that point in time? IE, Are the ranges showing what’s left in the battery or total range remaining since last charge?

Thanks in advance.
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
2,184
2,161
Maryland
Hi, I got my MY SR a week ago, but did not start driving it to/from work until three days ago. it is black on black on black and named the MY SR-71 Blackbird. My commute is 60 miles round trip. I live in South Florida and my commute is mostly on I-75 and the Palmetto expressway. I drive spiritedly. Usually not less than 70 unless traffic dictates. I’ve got a couple questions:

1. When I start driving I feel constant minor vibrations in the steering wheel. They go away after a bit. Could it be the tires?

2. On the Energy display are the displayed ranges, instant or average, calculated from the last charge or from that point in time? IE, Are the ranges showing what’s left in the battery or total range remaining since last charge?

Thanks in advance.
1.) If you feel a vibration in the steering wheel that may be the Tesla providing haptic feedback that you are driving over the white center line markings or shoulder marking.

1.) Check that your tire pressure is correct for all 4 tires. Don't rely on only the Tesla TPMS readout. Use an accurate tire pressure gauge; check tire pressure in the morning when the tires are cold. 42 PSI is the recommended tire pressure.

2) The Energy display provides for the current trip; last 15 miles or last 30 miles and instant or average energy usage. To reset the energy screen enter a destination in the Tesla Navigation system (be sure to add your home location and your work location into the Navigation system.)

When you select a destination the Energy Screen will display the expected energy usage along the route and will display any variation. On a longer trip you can use this information and either adjust your speed, use of climate control or detour to a charging location as required. On a 30 mile commute, each way, you should see a straight sloping line that would be based on the posted speed limits for the route and any elevation changes (not applicable since you live in the second flattest state in the union.) The Tesla Navigation system route planner does not take into account road conditions (i.e. rain, etc.) or head winds.
 

THF2021MY

Member
May 18, 2021
14
3
Florida
1.) If you feel a vibration in the steering wheel that may be the Tesla providing haptic feedback that you are driving over the white center line markings or shoulder marking.

1.) Check that your tire pressure is correct for all 4 tires. Don't rely on only the Tesla TPMS readout. Use an accurate tire pressure gauge; check tire pressure in the morning when the tires are cold. 42 PSI is the recommended tire pressure.

2) The Energy display provides for the current trip; last 15 miles or last 30 miles and instant or average energy usage. To reset the energy screen enter a destination in the Tesla Navigation system (be sure to add your home location and your work location into the Navigation system.)

When you select a destination the Energy Screen will display the expected energy usage along the route and will display any variation. On a longer trip you can use this information and either adjust your speed, use of climate control or detour to a charging location as required. On a 30 mile commute, each way, you should see a straight sloping line that would be based on the posted speed limits for the route and any elevation changes (not applicable since you live in the second flattest state in the union.) The Tesla Navigation system route planner does not take into account road conditions (i.e. rain, etc.) or head winds.
Thank you. I turned off the LDA a few days ago. I’ll check the tire pressure.

I drive to work and park the car for hours. I get back in and start driving. That starts a new “trip”? If I select the 30 mile range when I start home does it look back at the drive to work? The range estimate is an estimate of what is left in the battery at that point in time based on the last 5,15, or 30 miles or instant(ly) correct? If on the way home it says the range is 100 miles. That means the total range would be 100 plus the 30 miles I drove to work right?
 

jcanoe

Active Member
Oct 2, 2020
2,184
2,161
Maryland
The energy screen will keep track of the last 5, 15 and 30 miles you have driven. To clear the energy history you can select a destination from the Tesla Navigation touch screen or use the Voice Command; Press the right scroll wheel on the right side of the steering wheel and speak "Take me to Work" or "Take me Home" (also "Navigate to ...".) That should start a new route and reset the Energy Screen for the trip (even though it is only a 30 mile trip.)

The range estimate at the right side of Energy Screen chart is the estimated range remaining for your current state of charge (SOC) of the Tesla's battery. If you have already driven 30 miles and the estimated range is 100 miles then the total range is 130 miles (but if you followed the Tesla recommendation you only charged to 80% (this can be up to 90% for your daily driving needs) so 130 miles is in reality 80% of the estimated total range. If you charge to 100% as on a longer trip you would be able to travel ~162 miles (assumes your highway speed and outside temperature, HVAC settings head winds being the same.)

Many Tesla owners prefer to display the battery indicator as a % SOC instead of estimated miles. This can be changed from range to % within the Display screen settings. the % SOC is a more accurate indicator of the state of the battery. Estimated range does not take into account your preferred driving speed, temperature, road conditions or head winds.

If you have not done so swipe right at the bottom of the driving simulation on the Tesla screen. This will display the Current Trip; Since Last Charge; Trip A and Trip B energy usage and mileage statistics. To access the Since Last Charge, Trip A, Trip B stats swipe up. You can reset and rename Trip A and Trip B (Many prefer to rename Trip B to be be "Lifetime (do not reset)" to maintain the lifetime stats.
 
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