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M3SR+ or M3LRAWD

Discussion in 'The UK and Ireland' started by Subevo, Nov 8, 2019.

  1. Adopado

    Adopado Active Member

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    Yes the Tesla traction control is spectacularly good. I have the SR+ so it's only rear wheel drive but you would think it was AWD by the way it gets the power down with barely ever a twitch.
     
  2. Joelly

    Joelly Member

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    That’s good to know. Every other ev ive driven has struggled when putting your foot down.
     
  3. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Well-Known Member

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    Plenty of similar reports, but to my mind / on-paper this (200 miles in the wet) should be entirely possible in M3LR or M3P. I wonder why its proving to not be possible?

    Drag Times hired a track to do a comparison of Model-S and a Maclaren 650S ... but it was raining. So they ran some tests on just the Tesla

    2.7s 0-60s in the wet (that was back in the 2016 model)



    I have large-ish roundabout under dual carriageway with lights near me. I can stop for lights, taking the first exit, and the car is happy to do that, in the wet, using launch control, absolutely zero drama. Its a reasonable right-bend and then up the ramp. Actually I think its a more impressive mates'-demo than a straight-line throttle-mash.
     
  4. Joelly

    Joelly Member

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    To clarify, every other ev that isn’t a Tesla. Ie e golf and Kia e Niro. Tesla seemed very comfortable and responsive. As id like it to be.
     
  5. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Well-Known Member

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    Yes, I assumed that was what you meant. However, might include 2WD Teslas too ... I had a RWD loaner which squirmed in the wet when I put my foot down. (Didn't bother to check, tyres might have been worn or some other reason, and this was a couple of years ago)
     
  6. TMThree

    TMThree Active Member

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    You'll almost always get more for the higher trim, but its never enough to offset the higher cost. You only get back a fraction of what you spend. So if you are looking strictly at future recovery of funds spent, the more you spend, the more you lose. That should be obvious for any car purchase (except for some collectors items)
     
  7. Glan gluaisne

    Glan gluaisne Supporting Member

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    True, but as I went on to say:

    There's a tangible value in having a car with a higher spec, better performance, AWD etc. I could never justify owning aeroplanes in terms of value, they were always just toys. Maybe toys used to go and have a very expensive coffee at an airfield 50 miles away, just for fun, but still just toys. I view cars in much the same way, except they are partially functional as well.
     
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  8. Adopado

    Adopado Active Member

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    Yes, it's an aspect of the car that really surprised me. I describe it as "invisible" traction control because it's so rare that you are aware of it!

    Pushing it in most rear wheel drive cars of yesteryear... if you apply early power coming out of a corner where a questionable surface then gives you that kick out, needing a swift lift and a steering correction ... can be either fun or scary. In the Tesla in the same situation you may feel a mere hint of movement (more often none) and detect a softening of acceleration but the potential "problem" is taken care of with no drama. Nevertheless it doesn't feel "over tamed", the effect is relatively subtle. The car is very flat and planted with it's low centre of gravity. The time you feel the weight of the car is under braking from (very) high speed when you do need to press the pedal pretty hard. However, obviously the SR+ is not optimised for performance driving so if that's high on your agenda you know which model to choose!

    Though I've done some lary driving in years gone by I now mostly delight in how the car feels when driven smoothly and economically. It's a gorgeous drive in a light airy cabin, in comfortable seats etc etc (and so it bloody should be ... even the SR+ costs twice what I paid for my first house)!
     
  9. Joelly

    Joelly Member

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    Can you please expand on (very) high speeds please? Are you talking 80-100, or a fair chunk over 100?
     
  10. Adopado

    Adopado Active Member

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    round about 3 figures but it wasn't me officer ...
     
  11. Joelly

    Joelly Member

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    And would this be any different for LR v SR do you think? Possibly worse due to the extra weight?
     
  12. Adopado

    Adopado Active Member

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    Can't compare I'm afraid. The regen is so capable in normal driving that the brakes really don't get much of a work out. If driving for performance you would want to take account of this i.e. give them a bit of preparatory action before you are really going to depend on them! This is entirely to be expected. (When my brother used to have a tuning garage he would occasionally receive a car from a tentative driver who would complain of poor brake performance. Knowing that brakes would have been so lightly used for quite a period part of his assessment included giving the brakes a decent shake down on a test drive. Very often by the time he got back into the workshop the brakes were back to normal ... follow up with a basic brake service ... happy customer!
     
  13. gangzoom

    gangzoom Active Member

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    Quite agree, these cars are expensive, but personally for me worth every penny. If you can afford it there is no need to try an justify them with man maths, just get one an enjoy!

    A Kona is more efficient that is beyond doubt, but cars for me have to deliver more than just numbers on a page, its about the ownership experience. All I can say after 40K miles driving these things is they are the best cars I've owned by some margin.

    Expensive, unreliable(very), not all that efficient, on paper I should hate our Tesla, but instead its the opposite :).
     
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  14. WannabeOwner

    WannabeOwner Well-Known Member

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    Reports I read on here suggest that, but the published stats want to tell a different story

    EVComparison.jpg

    Compare Cars Side-by-Side
     
  15. tess19

    tess19 Member

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    My experience with the kona tells me it more efficient than the m3. Mind you, i have the m3p on sport mode all the time. Silly to have it any other way. :p
     
  16. Glan gluaisne

    Glan gluaisne Supporting Member

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    I wonder how much of the perceived range difference between something like a 64 kWh Kona and a 75 kWh (?) M3 is down to the driver? Is it possible that people that buy something like a 64 kWh Kona may be more interested in economy, so drive paying more attention to minimising energy consumption, than people who drive a M3, and may, possibly, be just a bit tempted to use the much higher performance?

    I know that if my wife's in the car with me I tend to use around 230 Wh/mile, whereas if I'm in the car alone I tend to use more than 300 Wh/mile. Yesterday is a good example. I went into town alone and Connected Drive tells me that the journey used 340 Wh/mile. I know full well why, as there was a youngster in a loud and much modified Golf behind me who thought he had a quick car, and I couldn't resist just using the (modest) acceleration of the i3. Can't wait to get the M3, partly for moments like that. Childish, I know...
     
  17. Cogarch

    Cogarch Member

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    See 0:23 for 60-120 kph comparison
     
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  18. VanillaAir_UK

    VanillaAir_UK Moderator UK and Ireland

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    tl;dr

    Just in case its not been mentioned though.

    A car battery has a limited number of usable charge cycles, they don't suddenly die, but lets say this is 70%-80% usable charge. Lets say its 500 charge cycles (full cycles, not top ups, but lifetime range remains same).

    So, say a SR hypothetically gets its 250 miles on a full charge, then battery lifespan is 125,000 miles. Say a LR gets 348 miles on full charge, then its lifespan is 174,000 miles.

    Of course, 500 charges is finger in air and will be dependent on many things, likewise, so are 250 and 348 range cos you won't get manufacturers quoted ranges either. Also, the number of times that a SR is discharged below 10% and charges above 90% may well be more than a LR owner needs to do. So a LR will likely stay in the battery sweet spot more often than a SR.

    For those that do not own their vehicles for long periods, then this is largely academic.
     
  19. VanillaAir_UK

    VanillaAir_UK Moderator UK and Ireland

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    Please don't do that too often ;) Once they realise their noisy car is on a hiding to nothing getting beaten by a silent Model 3, they will all be buying them. Much as I would love to see wide spread take up of EV's, at least with a ricer you know when they are around and causing a problem.

    My personal approach is to simply drive normally. I use chill mode. Then if they want a race off the lights, I either pull of normally and let them accelerate into the distance and give them nothing obvious to brag about, or, just hold right back and make them think they done good so they can brag to their mates and then at a later date get totally thrashed by another M3.

    I'm so much looking forward to the day though, when AP can take them on the lights and I can go waving at them with both hands as I accelerate off into the distance :D
     
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  20. Jason71

    Jason71 Active Member

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    Currently I have an Octavia and my wife has a Mini. Whichever of us is driving we find we travel much faster in the Skoda without realising it since the ride is so much more refined. Could this be a factor? Speed makes such a difference to range on an EV you would not have to go more than a couple of MPH faster in an M3 than in the Kona to find that the range was dropping a lot faster. Not saying the Kona is bad at motorway speeds, never driven one, but I'm sure it and the Tesla are at least different to some degree.
     

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