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  • The latest TMC Podcast (#14) is now available on YouTube and all major podcast networks. We covered FSD Beta's exciting v11 update, Enhanced Autopilot coming to the U.S. and Canada, and more!

Trying to Make Sense of Recent Software Versions, Update Numbers, and Downloads

After downloading it, to all those people who worry about not having 40.6 there isn’t really very much on it..
It’s really more about the rollout procedures, vs. features for me. Maybe it’s too simplistic, however, there’s only one update for every iOS device (excluding betas), from oldest to newest device. Why is Tesla’s so complicated? Looking forward to the best answers on this thread…
 

tps5352

Active Member
Supporting Member
Can you explain production builds vs non better? I’ll have to read the chart’s on my big computer.

Anyway, I have a 2021 MY built November 2020 and the rollouts have never made sense to me.

Just think if Tesla actually explained exactly how OTA updates work…

I am not the expert. But as explained to me, Production builds are just the regular software updates. (Some people get them a little earlier; some a little later.) They do not include the latest FSD Beta roll-outs.

Yes, that is my dream. (To dream, the impossible dream,...") Like the Man of La Mancha, I am tilting at windmills...
 
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Doesn't explain why my car is stuck way back on 2021.12.25.7 and has not updated for 116 days! M3 LR NonFSD MY2020 in Australia. Me and 0.1% of the fleet. Tesla tell me they have checked and there are no updates flagged for my VIN. Starting to peeve a bit now, as I can think of 5 features that I am missing that I would like. These is no obvious reason why they could not be on my car right now.
 
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tps5352

Active Member
Supporting Member
I’m in the same spot...

I have no insider information. But with all the recent software pushes documented by TeslaScope.com (Tesla Update History), I am hoping that folks like you get upgraded to one of the "40s" soon. Take a look at that online database (subset of Tesla owners) and what software they are getting. You can manipulate the display to just look at Model 3s for a particular version, Check out the previous versions, slso.

You might also want to confer by pm with RTmpaul to share info. He is very knowledgeable about software issues in general.
 
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For various reasons, software updates (via Tesla roll-outs) have lately been perhaps even more hotly anticipated than normal. Folks are understandably interested in:
  • Full Self Driving (FSD) Beta testing,
  • Navigation way-points,
  • Compatibility with an anticipated CCS Combo 1 adapter (for North America),
and other desirable features. (Plus, who doesn't love getting new "presents" from Tesla--provided they work?)

Scattered throughout a number of TMC Forum threads are (a) questions as to why particular cars have/do not have particular features and (b) bits of helpful information from the knowledgeable. Some have pointed to various aftermarket websites (which sell smart-phone app subscriptions to enhance the Tesla experience) that are tracking the software version downloads of their clientele-database participants. But confusing to a newbie (to this issue) like me were the software versions and numbers themselves--why did some receive one software version and others an entirely different version? ("Was it something I said?")

Here is a second attempt to map recent software version downloads. See if it helps answer such questions as:
  • Why does my car have a certain software version at a certain time?
  • Why do I have/not have certain features?
Chart Version 2
(Just "2." Not "2021.2." Just plain "2.")

Top View attachment 740026 Middle View attachment 740027 Bottom View attachment 740028 Notes View attachment 740031



Comments
  • As before, the (now four) screenshots purposely overlap somewhat.
  • Note that the presence of a particular feature depends on a number of variables including:
    • country,
    • model-year,
    • computer display version, and
    • whether car has FSD Beta or not.
  • I didn't pick up on this initially, but apparently only the USA currently has widespread FSD Beta testing going on? Is that right?

  • These software download "branches" portrayed are certainly not official and may not--probably do not--represent how Tesla software engineers actually plan software downloads.
  • This is a hypothetical portrayal intended to help understand a somewhat mysterious process.

  • As you see, I listed the downloads by number and not by date. Nevertheless, mostly the dates are sequential.
  • But the out-of-sequence dates trouble me somewhat, and suggest that more work is needed to refine the visual model and understand the process.

  • Judging by all the comments I've seen, we've all been frustrated or mystified at times (some more than others), and for good reason. But can I take a second to applaud Tesla? Imagine if you will, all the variables Tesla engineers have to consider. Among the obvious there are:
    • Nation-by-nation regulatory requirements.
    • Safety issues.
    • Inevitable changes in model-year hardware, computers, and software.
    • Regional traffic and infrastructural differences.
    • And so forth. (I'm probably just scratching the surface.)
      Anyway, my FSD Beta may not work in roundabouts very well right now, but it is still an amazing technological advancement, imo.
  • My thanks to other TMC members who helped me grasp this. And to current commenters. (I'll go take a look now.)
  • Any mistakes are mine (or those of the source material).
Looks good 👍
 

tps5352

Active Member
Supporting Member
Still utterly mystified why neither my 2017 90D Model S (with updated MCU) or 2020 Model Y haven’t gone past the 2021.36.x revision. Maybe it’s because they know i have a Tidal subscription and don’t want me using it?

I don't know anything about Tidal, but it would be nice if you got 1021.40+. There appears to be a lot of downloading going on worldwide. Check out Tesla Software Updates for a sample.
 
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tps5352

Active Member
Supporting Member
Doesn't explain why my car is stuck way back on 2021.12.25.7 and has not updated for 116 days! M3 LR NonFSD MY2020 in Australia. Me and 0.1% of the fleet. Tesla tell me they have checked and there are no updates flagged for my VIN. Starting to peeve a bit now, as I can think of 5 features that I am missing that I would like. These is no obvious reason why they could not be on my car right now.

Yes, sorry. My software info doesn't go back that far. But your car is not old at all. Check out Tesla Software Updates to see if you can detect a download pattern for your region from their database. Asia is getting 2021.40+ versions with features for them; why not Australia?

Does "MY2020" mean a 2020 Model Y? I didn't think they sold Model Y in Australia? (Just curious.)
 
Yes, sorry. My software info doesn't go back that far. But your car is not old at all. Check out Tesla Software Updates to see if you can detect a download pattern for your region from their database. Asia is getting 2021.40+ versions with features for them; why not Australia?

Does "MY2020" mean a 2020 Model Y? I didn't think they sold Model Y in Australia? (Just curious.)
MY2020 just means manufacturing year 2020. I have Teslafi to check update patterns and who is getting what. In Australia 2021.40+ versions are common too. Just not for me. I will see an update eventually I suppose and then I will compare where I am at to your chart
 
Two things that are very disappointing are:

1. When your Tesla model xyz, build matches other Tesla model builds, i.e., 2021 MY. And, multiple MY's have exactly the same build, built same month, located in the same region, but have two or more different OS builds.

2. Tesla's inability to explain rollout order discrepancy's.

I once put in a service request for both our Tesla's, after months' of not receiving an update(s) and maybe it's just coincidence, however, both vehicles received an update the same day, within in minutes of each other... 🤷🏼‍♂️

I just wish I knew more, besides all of the different Tesla vehicle builds, about why there are so many update iterations.
 
I'm usually on the front end of getting updates, 2020 Model Y LR FSD, Pennsylvania.
Really could use that live cam view, but stuck on 36.5.1.
Wondering if I opt out of FSD beta, will I get the update? My safety score is always around 95% so it seems unlikely that I'll actually get approved for the beta program anyway.
 
Last edited:
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I'm usually on the front end of getting updates, 2020 Model Y LR FSD, Pennsylvania.
Really could use that live cam view, but stuck on 36.5.1.
Wondering if I opt out of FSD beta, will I get the update? My safety score is always around 95% so it seems unlikely that I'll actually get approved for the beta program anyway.

I hear you, loud and clear. Live Sentry Mode, Waypoints, automatic pull-in parking, windshield wiper wash sequence automatically adjusts to your vehicle speed to better clear salt and grime, improved battery preconditioning delivers a faster charge, improved temperature consistency throughout the cabin, TACC chime, vehicle's range estimation modified to better represent real-world conditions, Alternative Navigation Routes.

⬆️ This is all we're missing out on...
 
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Need

Active Member
Nov 22, 2017
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Rancho Cucamonga
I think there maybe a lot of other reasons that are not included in the charts. For example, Model 3 has HW2.5 and HW3.0. They probably have different software update paths. Also newer Model 3 has exterior sound emitter (mine does not). The first thing I was to test was to see if I could talk thru the app, but only newer Model 3 could do that. My app could only "flash" or "horn". So that could produce different path of software update as well.
 
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I am not a Tesla insider (I am a retired IBM software engineer) but as I understand it, Tesla's releases are snapshots of a given week's software level. Eg: 36.8 is the eighth version of the week 36 software level. Tesla almost certainly follows a software development process called 'agile' where both new function and fixes to current function are continuously added to a development stream. That stream is then checkpointed at intervals, tested, fixed/updated as necessary (thus the eighth version of the week 36 build) and then released to users. The release is done in a staged manner to groups of users rather than to everyone at once so that if there is a problem only a subset of users will be affected. If a serious problem is found after the initial release, then you might see a 36.8.x 'fix' build for example.

If the above is correct, then when (for example) I get 40.6 I will not only get Tidal support and a tone when TACC is turned on (things that were added to the development stream after week 36), but also any fixes that were implemented between week 36 and week 40 even if Tesla doesn't explicitly talk about them in the release notes.

That takes me to the FSD release stream. I have to speculate here. Possibly it is an entirely different stream to which are added changes from the 'regular' stream (or vice-versa - the regular stream gets stuff from the FSD stream...) or possibly there really is only one stream but the FSD function is either walled-off in or deleted from the non-FSD releases and then the FSD version is given a unique version number. The latter would make more sense from an external point of view but perhaps Tesla has some good reason for keeping them completely separate.

It is in Tesla's best interests to have as few development streams as possible since each stream needs extensive testing and that is expensive. Likewise, it is in Tesla's best interests to have as few releases to support in the field as possible. Where they do maintain multiple/separate releases, they must have a good reason such as hardware-specific support, local regulations, or the staged release cycle that I mentioned above. When you see something like my experience of getting 3.106 after 4.18.1, it must have been worthwhile to Tesla to update the week 3 build with function/fixes from later builds rather than move my car to a later week's build (or stay on week 4 with those updates). I will guess that they did that because I have one of the unique chipsets which were being implemented this summer and it took until the week 32 build for support for my chipset to be part of the normal/common development stream.

I would expect that in the future there will only be one development stream and that FSD will always be present but gated by a software switch much like the acceleration boost for LRs or heated seats for standard models.
 
I am not a Tesla insider (I am a retired IBM software engineer) but as I understand it, Tesla's releases are snapshots of a given week's software level. Eg: 36.8 is the eighth version of the week 36 software level. Tesla almost certainly follows a software development process called 'agile' where both new function and fixes to current function are continuously added to a development stream. That stream is then checkpointed at intervals, tested, fixed/updated as necessary (thus the eighth version of the week 36 build) and then released to users. The release is done in a staged manner to groups of users rather than to everyone at once so that if there is a problem only a subset of users will be affected. If a serious problem is found after the initial release, then you might see a 36.8.x 'fix' build for example.

If the above is correct, then when (for example) I get 40.6 I will not only get Tidal support and a tone when TACC is turned on (things that were added to the development stream after week 36), but also any fixes that were implemented between week 36 and week 40 even if Tesla doesn't explicitly talk about them in the release notes.

That takes me to the FSD release stream. I have to speculate here. Possibly it is an entirely different stream to which are added changes from the 'regular' stream (or vice-versa - the regular stream gets stuff from the FSD stream...) or possibly there really is only one stream but the FSD function is either walled-off in or deleted from the non-FSD releases and then the FSD version is given a unique version number. The latter would make more sense from an external point of view but perhaps Tesla has some good reason for keeping them completely separate.

It is in Tesla's best interests to have as few development streams as possible since each stream needs extensive testing and that is expensive. Likewise, it is in Tesla's best interests to have as few releases to support in the field as possible. Where they do maintain multiple/separate releases, they must have a good reason such as hardware-specific support, local regulations, or the staged release cycle that I mentioned above. When you see something like my experience of getting 3.106 after 4.18.1, it must have been worthwhile to Tesla to update the week 3 build with function/fixes from later builds rather than move my car to a later week's build (or stay on week 4 with those updates). I will guess that they did that because I have one of the unique chipsets which were being implemented this summer and it took until the week 32 build for support for my chipset to be part of the normal/common development stream.

I would expect that in the future there will only be one development stream and that FSD will always be present but gated by a software switch much like the acceleration boost for LRs or heated seats for standard models.
Brilliant 👍😀
 
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I am not a Tesla insider (I am a retired IBM software engineer) but as I understand it, Tesla's releases are snapshots of a given week's software level. Eg: 36.8 is the eighth version of the week 36 software level. Tesla almost certainly follows a software development process called 'agile' where both new function and fixes to current function are continuously added to a development stream. That stream is then checkpointed at intervals, tested, fixed/updated as necessary (thus the eighth version of the week 36 build) and then released to users. The release is done in a staged manner to groups of users rather than to everyone at once so that if there is a problem only a subset of users will be affected. If a serious problem is found after the initial release, then you might see a 36.8.x 'fix' build for example.

If the above is correct, then when (for example) I get 40.6 I will not only get Tidal support and a tone when TACC is turned on (things that were added to the development stream after week 36), but also any fixes that were implemented between week 36 and week 40 even if Tesla doesn't explicitly talk about them in the release notes.

That takes me to the FSD release stream. I have to speculate here. Possibly it is an entirely different stream to which are added changes from the 'regular' stream (or vice-versa - the regular stream gets stuff from the FSD stream...) or possibly there really is only one stream but the FSD function is either walled-off in or deleted from the non-FSD releases and then the FSD version is given a unique version number. The latter would make more sense from an external point of view but perhaps Tesla has some good reason for keeping them completely separate.

It is in Tesla's best interests to have as few development streams as possible since each stream needs extensive testing and that is expensive. Likewise, it is in Tesla's best interests to have as few releases to support in the field as possible. Where they do maintain multiple/separate releases, they must have a good reason such as hardware-specific support, local regulations, or the staged release cycle that I mentioned above. When you see something like my experience of getting 3.106 after 4.18.1, it must have been worthwhile to Tesla to update the week 3 build with function/fixes from later builds rather than move my car to a later week's build (or stay on week 4 with those updates). I will guess that they did that because I have one of the unique chipsets which were being implemented this summer and it took until the week 32 build for support for my chipset to be part of the normal/common development stream.

I would expect that in the future there will only be one development stream and that FSD will always be present but gated by a software switch much like the acceleration boost for LRs or heated seats for standard models.
This makes a lot of sense to me, thank you!
 
  1. 2019 MX
  2. non-refresh
  3. US
  4. FSD beta
  5. Yes
  6. Yes
  7. I was pushed 2021.40, while working on safety score, and downloaded it. Despite maintaining a 99 for the past month i'm not getting granted into beta. I realize now that this version is on the non-FSD branch, but i'm confused on when i'll get FSD beta. Granted a 2021.36.x.x? Or have to wait for a FSD beta that is eventually 2021.40+?
 

tps5352

Active Member
Supporting Member
  1. 2019 MX
  2. non-refresh
  3. US
  4. FSD beta
  5. Yes
  6. Yes
  7. I was pushed 2021.40, while working on safety score, and downloaded it. Despite maintaining a 99 for the past month i'm not getting granted into beta. I realize now that this version is on the non-FSD branch, but i'm confused on when i'll get FSD beta. Granted a 2021.36.x.x? Or have to wait for a FSD beta that is eventually 2021.40+?

I am off (to gym). But see Post#37 and the following replies in this thread: Anyone Else.... It may help (or not).

To EVERYONE: Make sure you have a good, reliable connection to the Internet (e.g., strong connection to your home network) wherever the car is parked. I still have the premium connectivity thing, so maybe I get additional cellular phone Internet service in the car too? (Do I have that right? It seems like my Model X can download an update anywhere I am, around town.)
 

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