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Battery range

Hello! I just embarked on a 181 mile all -interstate trip. 65 degrees. Minimal to no stop and go. Left with 97% charge. Couldn't make it. Barely made it to a Supercharger 10 miles from home. My range was at 0 approximately 5 miles from the charger. This is not remotely close to the advertised range of my 2021 Model 3. Anybody else have similar issues?
 
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Tam

Well-Known Member
Nov 25, 2012
12,126
11,156
Visalia, CA
Hello! I just embarked on a 181 mile all -interstate trip. 65 degrees. Minimal to no stop and go. Left with 97% charge. Couldn't make it. Barely made it to a Supercharger 10 miles from home. My range was at 0 approximately 5 miles from the charger. This is not remotely close to the advertised range of my 2021 Model 3. Anybody else have similar issues?
Please supply enough info to understand your scenario.

I assume your EPA rating on the Monroney sticker is 263 miles?

If so that is not bad for your 181 mile trip.

You just need to learn from experience to plan for your next trip.

For my conservative driving style, I won't leave until my battery gauge has 100 miles extra.

In your case of 181 mile trip, my battery gauge must say 281 miles before I would leave.

Since your maximum charge is 263 miles which is less than my plan for charging to 281 miles, you did good.

Now, that you know, buy a longer range car. 600 miles doesn't mean you can easily drive 600 miles.

 
...181 mile all -interstate trip... Minimal to no stop and go...
Just going to highlight a few things you said.

All-Interstate
no stop and go

Both of these on a traditional gas car mean better range. Stop and go is bad in a gas car. Highway driving is better in a gas car.

In an EV it is the opposite. Highway is worse. Stop and go is good because you regen when you stop (you still come out negative net energy, but the impact is far less than a gas car). At a stop light you use almost no energy in your EV. Pretty much just your HVAC which will be minimal most of the time.

Speed kills range. Interstate speeds (you didn't mention how fast you were going) can really impact range. In your EV your biggest energy draw is drag, and drag increases with the square of speed meaning it goes up exponentially as you go faster. Range at 80 MPH on the interstate will be way less than 55 MPH on a secondary highway.

This is all normal. Unfortunately, when you switch from a gas car you come in with the same expectations you had in your gas car, but now they are reversed. In a gas car highway range is the best, but that's because gas cars are just so horribly inefficient in the city.

My best advice is to use the navigation to plot your journey, and the energy trip graph is generally pretty good at guestimating how much energy you will need, and in your case, it would have thrown a supercharger stop in for sure. The energy graph is surprisingly accurate.

If you ever feel like you won't make it home or to a charger, just decrease your speed and your consumption will go down a lot. But if you use the built-in navigation, it will tell you where and when to charge anyway.
 
Hello! I just embarked on a 181 mile all -interstate trip. 65 degrees. Minimal to no stop and go. Left with 97% charge. Couldn't make it. Barely made it to a Supercharger 10 miles from home. My range was at 0 approximately 5 miles from the charger. This is not remotely close to the advertised range of my 2021 Model 3. Anybody else have similar issues?
Did you use the in car Nav to navigate to your destination and if so what did it predict as your arrival SOC?
 

jjrandorin

Moderator, Model 3, Tesla Energy Forums
Moderator
Nov 28, 2018
17,480
23,406
Riverside Co. CA
Anybody else have similar issues?

Actually, yes, pretty much everyone in this 273+ page (273 pages of posts, not 273 posts) thread "has similar issues".

 
Actually, yes, pretty much everyone in this 273+ page (273 pages of posts, not 273 posts) thread "has similar issues".

Actually, I don't have such issues, but I must be unusual for posters in this forum in not driving 75+mph all the time.
 

stopcrazypp

Well-Known Member
Dec 8, 2007
13,518
10,057
Just going to highlight a few things you said.

All-Interstate
no stop and go

Both of these on a traditional gas car mean better range. Stop and go is bad in a gas car. Highway driving is better in a gas car.

In an EV it is the opposite. Highway is worse. Stop and go is good because you regen when you stop (you still come out negative net energy, but the impact is far less than a gas car). At a stop light you use almost no energy in your EV. Pretty much just your HVAC which will be minimal most of the time.
Yeah, I find when I get stuck in traffic, I get significantly better range on my EV. Definitely not the case in a gas car.
 
Hello! I just embarked on a 181 mile all -interstate trip. 65 degrees. Minimal to no stop and go. Left with 97% charge. Couldn't make it. Barely made it to a Supercharger 10 miles from home. My range was at 0 approximately 5 miles from the charger. This is not remotely close to the advertised range of my 2021 Model 3. Anybody else have similar issues?
What exact vehicle do you have?
What was your Wh/mi?
 

Undecided_2

Member
Supporting Member
Jan 21, 2022
618
447
Helensburgh
Model Y 2022 March build lates software.

The shortest range that I’ve had recently is driving in (8c) 42f, sleet, rain with climate on 68f (20c) some sections we were sitting at 70mph when safe for 60mins or so but most was around 60mph.

We managed 193 miles - left at 95% with preconditioning using home power until ready -with 16% SOC when we plugged in. We were not surprised considering the conditions/speed.
 
Just going to highlight a few things you said.

All-Interstate
no stop and go

Both of these on a traditional gas car mean better range. Stop and go is bad in a gas car. Highway driving is better in a gas car.

In an EV it is the opposite. Highway is worse. Stop and go is good because you regen when you stop (you still come out negative net energy, but the impact is far less than a gas car). At a stop light you use almost no energy in your EV. Pretty much just your HVAC which will be minimal most of the time.

Speed kills range. Interstate speeds (you didn't mention how fast you were going) can really impact range. In your EV your biggest energy draw is drag, and drag increases with the square of speed meaning it goes up exponentially as you go faster. Range at 80 MPH on the interstate will be way less than 55 MPH on a secondary highway.

This is all normal. Unfortunately, when you switch from a gas car you come in with the same expectations you had in your gas car, but now they are reversed. In a gas car highway range is the best, but that's because gas cars are just so horribly inefficient in the city.

My best advice is to use the navigation to plot your journey, and the energy trip graph is generally pretty good at guestimating how much energy you will need, and in your case, it would have thrown a supercharger stop in for sure. The energy graph is surprisingly accurate.

If you ever feel like you won't make it home or to a charger, just decrease your speed and your consumption will go down a lot. But if you use the built-in navigation, it will tell you where and when to charge anyway.
This is good advice - I just went to teslacon 2022 in space coast - about 250 miles from boynton beach - coming home just said - navigate home - the car suggested a 20 min charge at Port St. Lucie - the chargers were at a large service center - that allowed for clean bathroom / and DD breakfast - nav put me in driveway w 25 % charge - 3 months w model 3 - LFP battery 🔋 goes to 100 percent - being driving in chill mode
 

KenC

Active Member
Sep 4, 2018
4,855
4,612
Maine
Hello! I just embarked on a 181 mile all -interstate trip. 65 degrees. Minimal to no stop and go. Left with 97% charge. Couldn't make it. Barely made it to a Supercharger 10 miles from home. My range was at 0 approximately 5 miles from the charger. This is not remotely close to the advertised range of my 2021 Model 3. Anybody else have similar issues?
So, let's just say you drove from Birmingham to Athens, AL and back, 192miles, all interstate. At the speed limit of 65mph, you could have made it with 5% remaining with an efficiency of 278Wh/mi, trip time of 2h53m. But, since I doubt many people drive at the speed limit, you weren't going to make it without a quick SC stop. If you had driven faster, say 113% of speed limit, or about 8mph above the limit, generally pretty safe to avoid tickets, you could have done the trip in 2h41m or 12m faster, and still have stopped for 6m of supercharging. As long as there are superchargers on your trip, the best strategy is to drive as fast as you are comfortable with, and make a quick supercharger stop, and eliminate any risk of running out of charge.
 
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Hello! I just embarked on a 181 mile all -interstate trip. 65 degrees. Minimal to no stop and go. Left with 97% charge. Couldn't make it. Barely made it to a Supercharger 10 miles from home. My range was at 0 approximately 5 miles from the charger. This is not remotely close to the advertised range of my 2021 Model 3. Anybody else have similar issues?
All highway explains everything as it will consume way more power. Tesla EPA range is like ICE range at best case value (for ICE it is on the highway, for EV it is in the city where regen kicks in).

My Plaid on the highway at 75-80MPH does 350 wh/mile and if you do the math on a 96kwh battery pack that is 274 miles (way far from the estimated range of 348).

City driving, I get around 290 wh/mile which yield to a 331 mile range (close to the estimated) range. I have seen 280wh/mile after a 20 mile drive to downtown Orlando and bumper to bumper I-4. traffic.


So check your consumption and age of battery to estimate degradation.
 
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Rocky_H

Well-Known Member
Feb 19, 2015
8,757
11,430
Boise, ID
Maybe stop at a charging station to add a few extra miles couple of dollars/pounds worth of energy doesn't harm the pocket much. :)
I've found this is common with people switching to electric for the first time. They are so used to the habit of "NO STOPS = FASTER" and so they try to do everything possible to stretch things out with white knuckling and giving themselves an ulcer. It's an adjustment to be able to realize that taking a hit of juice for 15 minutes every 2 or 3 hours isn't bad and is the more relaxing and faster way of doing that than trying to fill all the way up to full and then go as far as possible to avoid stopping.
 

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