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How to approach landlord about charging?

Discussion in 'Model 3' started by wrf2e, Mar 12, 2017.

  1. wrf2e

    wrf2e Member

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    We are currently renting a single-family home in the Dallas/Ft-Worth area. I have a reservation for a model 3 and no plans to move before I take delivery. I am looking for tips on the best way to approach the landlord with the request to wire the garage for charging. It would be ideal if I could convince him to pay for the install (selling point for future tenants etc.), however I am willing to pay for the work if needed. Does anyone know of any incentives that might make convincing him easier? Unless there are unforeseen problems (needing to upgrade the box), it should be a fairly simple/cheap install. The box is in the garage almost exactly where the outlet would need to be located.
     
  2. calisnow

    calisnow Active Member

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    I'm a landlord and if my tenants approached me I'd be happy to work with them. I think folks are, in general, excited about clean energy and feeling like they are part of the solution. Giving your landlord a chance to work with you helps them feel they are helping the planet.
     
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  3. JohnSnowNW

    JohnSnowNW Active Member

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    You missed the deadline for the federal EVSE charging tax credit by a little over 3 months. Unfortunately, you're going to have to convince him to install without a monetary incentive.

    If the panel is in the garage, you are looking at a pretty cheap install.
     
  4. Lysol

    Lysol Member

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    See if you can split the installation costs 50/50 with him/her.
     
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  5. brucet999

    brucet999 Active Member

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    As a landlord, I have always been receptive to improvements that:
    a. Cost me nothing.
    b. Would be done competently without causing damage that would have to be repaired before re-renting.
    c. Would not increase my legal or insurance liability exposure.
    d. Would not violate any building or health codes.

    Items b, c, & d probably mean installation by a licensed electrician with proper city permits pulled.

    As to whether an EV charging outlet could be seen as increasing property value, it is not very likely, since EVs make up only a fraction of 1% of cars on the road. To a landlord, increased value exists solely as something that commands higher rent or which makes the property more desirable than competing ones so it would stay vacant a shorter time. What is the neighborhood like? Lots of houses competing for renters? Lots of Leafs and Teslas in the area?
     
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  6. wrf2e

    wrf2e Member

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    There are several homes in the neighborhood that are rented, however they don't appear to stay on the market long. I haven't seen any all-electric vehicles but who knows how that will change with the Bolt / Model 3. The area is far enough from Fort Worth and Dallas that most have a significant commute (I would guess about 60 miles round-trip). It is also not a neighborhood where you would expect to find many vehicles in the price-range of the S. I don't know how much the number of EVs will rise, but I would say the price point and range of the Bolt and 3 are more appropriate for the area.

    I don't know the landlord personally, as he uses a property management company. However, I'm pretty sure he is a college professor, and it may be stereotyping, but I would think that would make him more EV friendly/environmentally conscious.

    I plan on emailing him this week. I will link to the charging information provided by Tesla. Assuming he doesn't know anything about what would be required, is there anything else I should give him so he knows what is involved?
     
  7. RandyS

    RandyS Fan of Elon

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    If I were in your shoes, I would simply seek permission from the landlord to have the installation done at your expense. That way, I think you're more likely to get a "yes".

    Armed with his/her agreement, I would then have an electrician install a NEMA 14-50 receptacle with the shortest possible run to the panel. This shouldn't cost more than 300 or 400 dollars, even with the cost of permits, etc.

    Then, with that receptacle installed, you can use the portable charging station that comes with your Model 3 to charge your car. Problem solved, with a minimum of cost and fuss.

    If the day ever comes when you move out, then you leave behind the receptacle and take your portable charging station with you to the next house....
     
    • Like x 8
  8. ThisIsTrue

    ThisIsTrue Member

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    FWIW, I used a professional electrician to install a HPWC (I own my own home) and a NEMA 14-50 (for the utmost in flexibility) and the electrician said there was no need for a permit. That will of course vary from jurisdiction to jurisdiction. Total cost for the whole job, including the outlet in a box: $500 flat. The two outlets are right by the electrical panel, so very little heavy gauge wire was needed.

    (Oh, and then I listed it on Plugshare so any EV visitors to my rural area can use it if they get desperate.)
     
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  9. Booga

    Booga Member

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    Get by on a standard outlet if possible. If you have a dryer outlet, you're set and don't need the landlord to do anything.

    As a poster said above, the EV market share is small and not yet large enough for a high current AC outlet to be worth the investment for them. Do it on your own with a licensed professional or just get by with the standard outlet. (Given that the S charges at 3 miles per hour, you'll probably get 4 for the model 3)
     
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  10. DragonWatch

    DragonWatch Small Foot Print

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    As home owne & landlord here are my two cents. I am having two NEMA 14-50s tomorrow in my own home for $525 including city building department inspection. Two outlets so I can drive straight in or back in and be prepared for any situation. If I had gone with only one outlet within 18" of junction box it would have been $325. Since I own the home I can if still available here receive $500 rebate from power company.
    As a landlord and support alternative energy, and knowing about the possible rebate I would install it and take the difference as profits. I would have to verify the rebate qualifications with a rental, but what the heck.
    Another perspective from the landlords point of view is if utilities are included in the rent.
    Our area is saturated with Prius and Leafes, Bolts coming in but I do not know what they look like yet, too focused on picking out the MSs & MXs;)
     
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  11. Chewy3

    Chewy3 If MacGvyer had a beard

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    Ways my tenants could convince me:

    1. Pay for the entire thing themselves (professional hire - no DIY)
    2. Pay more in rent over a period of time that would cover all the costs I incur if I pay for the install (+50/mo for a year maybe)
    3. Get appraisals for the value increase to the property, I MIGHT pay the amount I would gain in equity if they can convince me the property value will increase by $xxx amount.
     
  12. brucet999

    brucet999 Active Member

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    OK, the landlord uses an agent, so he is not an active participant in the management of the property. Your observation that he is a professor (presumably SMU?) suggests he would be sympathetic with at least minimally supporting EVs, but I don't think a link to Tesla would help. Unless he is an engineering professor, he won't understand the info, but will just see expensive electric cars. My suggestion then is to contact him directly, if possible, and in writing, to seek permission to install, by a licensed professional, a 240 Volt EV/RV charging outlet in your garage like this: GE 50 Amp Temporary RV Power Outlet-U054P - The Home Depot. State that you would expect that it would be left in place upon your moving out, unless the owner wants it removed. (leaving it would be a small loss, since the 50A breaker probably won't fit the panel wherever you move). Ask if he would consider sharing the cost with you.

    Keep all of your original receipts and permits, sending only copies if he asks for proof of proper installation. Unfortunately, Federal tax credits on EVSE charging installations have expired and Texas has no EV credits, but check with your tax advisor whether the cost can be written off under some other category of expense.
     
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  13. Jason Bourne

    Jason Bourne Member

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    OP, maybe offer to cover the labor portion of the electrician's bill if the landlord covers the parts portion?
     
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  14. jdowell362

    jdowell362 Member

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    What if you as the landlord were paying for the electricity? My apt pays for all utilities. I only pay a rent check. Everything especially they pay for. When I told them I got a tesla they were quite hesitant to be willing to have me plug it in. It is an old building and may not even be able to support it, but I'm sure if it did and if I even paid for it to be done right they wouldn't let me. What, in your experience, would you say? Thanks!
     
  15. brucet999

    brucet999 Active Member

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    I would say that you are probably SOL.
    • Charging a Tesla would probably at least double the apartment's electricity cost with no benefit to the landlord.
    • In an old building, the addition of a large new load would be a possible risk to old wiring, again with no benefit to the landlord.
    • PG&E used to offer special EV charging rates on a separate meter. If you offered to pay for installation of the extra meter and the charging outlet, then the objections above would be removed. PG&E should be able to tell you about it and also determine if the incoming power lines to the building can support the added load.
    To get permission, you would have to at least eliminate the landlord's downside risk and at best provide him a benefit.
     
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  16. oktane

    oktane Active Member

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    Talk about entitlement. You want your landlord to pay for your EV charging setup? Get real. You want it, you should pay for it. Please don't ask the landlord to pay for it. I'd lose a gasket if my tenants asked me that.
     
  17. David99

    David99 Active Member

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    I think it's totally reasonable to ask the landlord. Some landlords like to keep their house up to date or add improvements. It's something that adds value to the home or at least makes it more desirable for a future renter. I have seen it specifically mentioned in houses for rent descriptions. It is an expense that the tenant pays but stays with the home, so it becomes a free gift to the landlord. So I think it's perfectly reasonable to at least ask to split the cost.
     
  18. djplong

    djplong Member

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    Being a landlord of a single-family home, I'd be receptive to an offer to split the cost. But, then, I'm a Tesla fan so there's that...
     
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  19. Brovane

    Brovane Member

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    I wouldn't ask for a hardwire. Just ask the landlord if you can work with him to get an L14-50 outlet installed in the garage. This will allow you the biggest flexibility and will supply about 10kw of charging.
     
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  20. MorrisonHiker

    MorrisonHiker S 90D 17.32.6ca28227

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    I would get a regular NEMA 14-50 installed, not an L14-50.
     
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